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Edward August Sauzek, World War I soldier

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Unit ID 222586

 

 

 

Page 1.

 

[A May 1, 1919 typewritten letter to Mrs. Sauzek from the Kansas historical society.]

 

Page 2.

 

[A May 29, 1919 typewritten letter to Mrs. Sauzek from the K. H. S.

 

Page 3.

 

[News paper article dated January 3, 1922 announcing the funeral of Private Edward Sauzek.]

 

Page 4.

 

[An April 9, 1919 typewritten letter to Mrs.Sauzek from the K. H.. S.]

 

Page 5.

 

Pvt 1 cl. Edward A. Sauzek, 146-6551

Battery C. 130 Field Artillery 35 Division

 

Edward August Sauzek was born March 10, 1895 on a farm near Wellington Kans, Sumner County, at the age of 6 years with parents and two brothers he then moved to a farm near Wichita  Kans, Sedgwick County. Where he lived until drafted in service Sept 22, 1917. He attended country schools for several years, also parochial school in Wichita and Wichita business college. On returning home he intended to go into farming and dairying business, which was his former occupation.

 

He was a member of St. Mary's Cathedral and the Knights of Columbus Lodge. He began training at Camp Funston Ft. Riley Kans. after starting there one month, was transferred to Camp Doniphan Ft. Sill Okla. he stayed there in the Field Artillery until he left for France in May 1918. He enjoyed only one furlough and that he spent at home visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sauzek and his two brothers George T. Sauzek and August H. Sauzek. He was wounded in action on Sept. 25, 1918 near Newville, France (by shell splinters) and died on October 11, 1918, at Base Hospital No. 1 and have been buried on October 13, 1918 in Cemiture des Bartona, Vichy, Alier, France American Plot, Grave No. 58. We also received his Victory Metal with  3 bars. St. Michiel, Meuse-Argonne, Defensive Sector.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sauzek were born in St. Clair County, Illinois.

 

Page 6.

 

Wichita  Kans

April 3, 1919

 

Kansas State Historical Society

William E. Connelly Secty.

 

Enclose find a photograph of Edward A. Sauzek and also the copies of his letters, I just copy the letters the way he wrote them so you can take out whatever you want or can use.

 

Sincerely yours

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kans

R.R. No 1 Box 64

 

Page 7.

 

[A March 25, 1919 typewritten letter to Mrs. Sauzek from the K. H. S.]

 

Page 8.

 

[An envelope addressed to the K. H. S.]

 

Page 9.

 

Wichita Kansas

April 2, 1919

 

Kansas State Historical Society

William E. Connelley  Secty. and

 

Dear Sir-

 

Enclosed you will find as complete a biographical sketch as I can give any more details regarding his life in service that you would care to use will be found in his letters which are enclosed in separate package also his picture

 

Very sincerely

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kansas

R.R. No 1. Box 64

 

Page 10.

 

[ A sketch  of Edward Sauzek's life  containing the same information as page 5, with the following exception:" he was wounded on September 24, 1918 by shrapnel shell splinters for some time these wounds did not seem serious, but proved fatal as he died October 11, 1918 at Vichy France."]

 

Page 11.

 

Wichita Kans March 14, 1919

 

Mr. William E Connelly Sec.

Kansas State Historical Society

 

Dear Sir:

 

I will let you know that we received the beautiful massage of sympathy, we certainly appreciate it and thank you very much for it.

 

We regret that we have been waiting so long in letting you know, we thought we would send you the picture of our son Edward A. Sauzek as you request us to do, but for some reason we have been waiting for more information in regard to our dear sons death, and we are still waiting, we have not got the full details yet.

 

But we will send you his picture and copies of his letters, a sketch of his life, as you request us to do.

 

Thanking you once more for the beautiful massage and kind sympathy

 

Sincerely yours

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kans.

R. R. No 1. Box 64.

 

Page 12.

 

Wichita Kans March 24, 1919

 

Mr. William E Connelly Sec.

Kansas State Historical Society

 

Dear Sir

 

I wrote to you that I would send you a picture of Edward A. Sauzek and copies of his letters and sketch of his life, as you request one to do.

 

What is it you want for a sketch of his life, could you sent me a paper to fill out or tell me about what you want to know.

 

I will fill it out if I can, or answer your question.

 

Sincerely yours

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kans

R. R. No 1 Box 64

 

Page 13.

 

Wichita Kansas

April 7, 1919

 

Kansas State Historical Society

William E. Connelley Secty.

 

We received a greeting from Washington today it reads.

 

This is to certify that

Edward A. Sauzek

Private 1st Class, Battery C. 130th Field Artillery, died with honor in the service of his country on the eleventh day of October 1918.

 

Given at Washington DC office of the Adjutant General of the Army this twelfth day of February one thousand nine hundred and nineteen.

 

So we just got that today that he was Private 1st Class. So I wish you would note this as I gave you only Private in his sketch of life, but I remember now that he mention it once in his letters while he was in camp that he was Private 1st  Class. I also want to mention the way our telegram read, it is officially reported that Private Edward A Sauzek Field Artillery died October 11 from wounds received in action.

 

Sincerely yours

Mrs. Minnie  Sauzek.

 

Page 14.

 

This is a copy of a letter that I have received I wrote for information concerning our sons death.

 

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

R.F. D. 1. Wichita Kans

Dear Mdm.,

 

I have just received your letter relative the death of your son, a member of battery " C" 130th Field Artillery, while in the service of his country in France.

 

This battery was made up and organized here at Pittsburg Kans, and I was one of its officers, and went to Camp Doniphan with it last October 1917,

after reaching the there so many men were discharged because of disability and were transferred to other and more suitable branches of the service for their own welfare, that our battery was soon depleted in numbers and it became necessary to obtain men to fill the battery to is more strength so we received two groups of men who had been drafted and who had been sent to camp Funston and which brought our battery up to its more strength again. Your son was among these.

 

He was not in the Battery very long before his worth, cheerful disposition and willingness to work hard and learn, made him noticeable among his comrades and also made him very popular. He never was complaining or grumbling over his lot in life, but was always cheerful

 

Page 15.

 

and willing to help do the best he could always and at any time. I remember him well, tall and well built in body and limb, always ready and willing to do a little more than his just share of the work.

 

The men all liked him because of his qualities and he had the fullest confidence of his officers too.

 

I left the service in May 1918 and came back here and resumed my work here while the battery went over to France.

 

I wish to extend you, his mother, my sincerest regrets and heartfelt sympathy at your great loss in this war, but it is a great consolation to you to know that your boy died a man, while in the service of his country, and in support of his in your flag and to know that he never outraged any person while wearing his uniform in the name of his country. That he was respected and a full man in every sense of the word by all who knew him, and that his death has marked a line across which no enemy has dared to set foot. He died so liberty I live for all mankind. Do not grieve, because he died a noble death.

 

Your son has grown erect and righteous, and gave his all to the flag in the country

 

Page 16.

 

he loved so well, while he was respected and honored by all who knew him and were associate with him.

 

Your son " has budded on earth, to bloom in heaven," and may you meet him there when your end comes as it comes to all mortal man.

 

Sincerely yours

P. Lauis Zickgraf.

 

Mr. William E Connelley

I thought I would copy you this letter maybe you could find something in it that you can use.

 

I will try and look up some more letters of Edward A.Sauzek I wasn't able to copy anymore last week, I will copy them and send them as soon as I can.

 

Sincerely yours

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

 

Page 17.

 

Wichita Kans May 2719 19

 

Kansas State Historical Society

Mr. William E Connelley Sec.

 

Dear Sir

 

I am sending you a few more copies of Edward A.Sauzek letters and a sketch of his life, I think this is more complete we knew more about it we had more information, than the other time I wrote that, I hate to bother you so often but I think this is more right I was too much in a hurry and by going all over his letters and the information we got since, and the boys are back now that were with him in his company they say to that he was wounded on the Sept, 25 but not serious but them wounds seem to prove fatal as he died October 11.

 

Very sincerely

Mrs. Minnie Sauzet

Wichita Kans.

R. R. No 1 Box 64

 

Page 18.

 

[This page is essentially a duplicate of Page 5.]

 

Page 19.

 

Camp Doniphan Jan 30, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines this evening I received your letter today noon, and seeing that you had some more cold-weather and snow, well it was four above here Sunday morning then it warmed up again Monday and the wind was in the South and it was not a bit cold Tuesday night, till it changed this morning about five  o'clock, to the north and by eight it was down to about zero about zero it droped about  25° in three hours and the wind blowing hard and snowing a little not to amount to anything.

 

We did not have to drill, we had school all day in the mess hall that made it nice, we have a new Col. he treats us better than the last one we had. It sure gets cold here it must be below zero tonight from the way it feels now, toward Sunday when it was four above, and most of us are all short on wood, but we was first to the woodpile tonight, it is all in the tents, I'm sitting on some socks on the floor with one foot on one side of the stove and the other on the on the other side to keep warm and am writing this with a lantern hanging on the stove pipe. Oh, this is sure is great we got a floor in our tent now and got it sided, it is about as cold as it was before as the cracks are too big we have not got any tarpaper on the sides yet, and we have not a door we only got gunney sacks tacked over the hole it is some house. I like the Army fine if it was only warm weather, but I sure do not like it, when it is cold like now, it is about 6 or 7 below now it is still blowing from the north, but one thing I never get cold in my bed. Well I will close and go to bed. With best wishes from

 

Edw.

 

Page 20.

 

Letter of Edward A. Sauzek.

 

Page 21.

 

Camp Funston Oct 10, 1917.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received two of your letters yesterday we have not done hardly anything yet today we had only about one  hour drill this morning and when we came back they had an officer to speak to us on buying a Liberty bond we do not have to buy any, but they want us too. $50 and $100 bonds on easy payments for $50 bonds they keep $10 out each month for five months and $20 out for the $100 bonds for 5 months, our company have already taken out about four thousand dollars worth so far but I did not take any yet, I guess it would be all right but I will wait awhile yet.

 

Well I do not think I will get to come home Sat. because I guess we will get our next shot him under the arm about that time, and it is about our time for guard duty Sat. that is what the Sgt. said, if I am on duty I cannot get off, Irwain is going to go home Sat., I seen him last night, but I think I will ask, but I do not think it will do any good because they are too strict, but we do not do anything from Sat. noon until Monday morning, but they do not care anything about us, so you do not need to look if I come it will be an accident, the captain that Irwin spoke about getting off said, he will let him go this time but not anymore so if I ever get back once I will be lucky before we go to France.

 

Well I will keep warm from now on they issued us a comfort today, and and other suit of underwear and two pair of sox, so you need not send anything anymore till I tell you to, we first got two woolen blankets and a tick filled with hay on good springs but we have no pillows we do not need any I have my sweater

 

Page 22.

 

Letter of Edward A Sauzek.

 

Page 23.

 

under my head under the one blanket so I have two blankets and two comforts so it is plenty each one of the blankets is double just as big as a comfort.

 

Say, I seen all of the bunch that come up yesterday Less Baker is about the only one that I knew very well they are all coming up here tonight.

 

Well I sure wished I could come home for Sunday dinner but I guess there won't be anything to it.

 

Well I will close for this time and tell some more of them to write to me around there, (I am feeling just fine).

 

From Ed.

 

Page 24.

 

Oct. 22, 1917

 

Dear Mother

 

I will write a few lines from this train we left Camp Funston this morning at 11:20 we are sure traveling slow we are in Topeka now and it is nearly 3 and we have not had our dinner yet, but will have soon, I am going to mail this at Kansas City but none of us can get off but the Lieut. will mail it for us, I think we are going to Ft. Sill but we do not know, we are going a long way around to get there the way we are traveling. It sure was cold up here this morning and all the way up it snowed heavy just like in winter it rained first then snowed it now looks like winter appear.

 

We will be in Kansas City about 4 or 5 o'clock I do not know if we change they are not.

 

Well how is everybody I am feeling fairly good my vaccination took so my arm sure is sore and full of fever but not as bad as it was I had the headache for about two days.

 

We sure are having a time on the train there five hundred on the train all going to the same place, where, we do not know, but about 10 or 12 cars, we sure get to see a lot of sights, when we pulled into Topeka they came out and sold us lunches $.25 a box consisting of 2 ham sandwiches a piece of pie and an orange the best stuff we had to eat for a month the ham was at least.

 

I guess I will close as it is hard to write on here, we will have our dinner in about 20 min.

 

With best wishes, will write when I get there

 

From Ed.

 

Page 25.

 

Camp Doniphan April 2, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter this evening & also the papers, I am feeling real good now still at the old job I guess I cannot quit it, we went on a hike this morning the hole reg. About 1300 men and the hole 129 reg. And about seven thousand Infantry men about 10,000 men in all it was a column a little more than a mile long, and four men wide it was a bunch, we walked seven miles we left at eight this morning and got back at eleven thirty we had three 15 min. rest we carried our guns that was all we had to carry and we did not have to do anything since eleven thirty this morning, we was off the rest of the day, if we did not have such a good Col. we would of not got off but I worked nearly all afternoon I done my washing & took a good bath the wind got up a bit strong this afternoon and blowed some dust, but I hung up my wash in my tent it is just about all dry now.

 

Where is Irwin Bingham is he and Funston yet? or in France.

 

Well I do not know a bit of news, I cannot write a letter as long as you can it is the same old thing all the time, so I will close for this time with best wishes & love from

 

A soldier, Edw.

 

Page 26.

 

Camp Doniphan Oct 28 1917.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter yesterday evening the first one that I received since I have been here. Well how is everybody by now I am just fine I like this place now better than I did at camp Funston only the first night or two I did not like but it is alright now, we have board floor in our tent, we put it in yesterday afternoon and we are going to put sides on it about three feet high and the tents on top of that, then it will be warmer than them buildings up at Funston, there are ten of us in one tent, it is a regular camp life, we are of every Wed. afternoon and from Sat. at 10 until Mon. morning that is we have got no drilling to do only some cleanup work for a few hours. We sure see some sights here the airplane are up in the air all day nearly, there are as high as ten up in the air at once, the wind does not all of them only if he gets awful windy, the aviation school is only about one mile from here we call that close, we took a little walk Thur. afternoon of five miles from 1:30 until quarter of three and we kept in step all the time we are only thirty five from the Texas line, the wind and dirt sure is a fright here, this is no place for you to come too as the wind blows that way about six days out of the week we cannot see six feet in front of us, now yesterday it was just fine but they say it hardly ever is that way most of all them wear goggles, it is not necessary for any of you come this far I am

 

Page 27.

 

getting along just fine do not worry a thing about me for I am in better health than ever before.

 

I just come from mass of the YMCA they have it there at 6:00 and a 9. But they have got a K of C. hall just about finished they are going to dedicate it Nov 11 then they will have it there.

 

They sure have good eats here roast beef, gravy, bacon and beans, nice [XX] oatmeal butter jelly, bread and good bread too and coffee, so it will be any use for you to send anything for we got all we want to eat. Tell Geo. to tell Arthur Wood when he comes down to let me know and have Geo. come with him if he can get of, they sure will get to see something. I am off Sat. and Sunday if I am not on some kind of work, or guard, but it is to dirty a place for you to come to. I ought to have wrote sooner but I was to busy we do not get so much time and there always is somebody here because I know so many that were here when I came.

 

They have a nice band a playing and the airplane are buzzing.

 

I will close with good wishes

 

From your soldier son

Ed. Sauzek's

 

Page 28.

 

Camp Funston Oct. 8 1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines this evening to let you know that I received your comfort this morning it just came in time a quarter of six and took a half mile run before breakfast the air sure was cool and after breakfast we took our physical drill four companies together 17th 18th 19th and 20th of about 150 men to a company, the worse thing was they would not let us wear our coats, because we could not go through the training well enough, we went out at 730 and we did not get to where our coats all day, it was sure cold but we will stand a lot of hard fights yet worse than that yet this winter if we stay here, I am getting used to this life, because I am just feeling fine. I know I will keep warm tonight as this is a nice big comfort.

 

Boylen and I went to church yesterday morning at 8 o'clock there sure was a crowd there it was clear full there was between 800 and one thousand there they are going to have a quire next Sunday if they can organice one this week they have a little organ there in the back, and they have 3 soldier boys for altar boys dressed in uniform only in shirtsleeves the priest sleeps there in a little room in the back, he said that he was going to have help in a few weeks another priest would come and help. Well I went to church in my full uniform this time. Well I did not get any mail since your letter last Friday noon more than 3 days now, not a bit of mail.

 

Well I will close and go to bed now, love to all from

 

Your son, Ed.

 

Page 29.

 

Camp Doniphan January 31, 1918

 

Dear Geo.

 

I received your letter this noon and seeing that you had a nice eve.Tue. it was nice here to but a change to early Wed. morning, but it does not make any differents if we do have a nice evenings here as I do not go anywhere and we all got to lie in bed by ten, it sure has been cold here the last two days and it is as cold tonight as it was last night, I do not know just how cold it was this morning but it must have been as low as six below zero it is still cloudy, the wind is still blowing and there is no sign of warm weather yet I only hope it will get warm soon as this weather sure is awful to be out and around in these tents we did not go out to drill yesterday or today, we have school in the mess hall all day as we are not allowed to have fire in our tents between eight in the morning till 330 in the afternoon, and then we have to set right on the stove, we have a board floor now, and we were lucky enough to have them put up a door today but it has cracks and holes of an inch wide in them, I would like to have you down here for a few days like today you would sure freeze in here as you would not be used to it.

 

Well I will close for this time and go to bed

 

From brother Ed.

 

Page 30.

 

This is a copy of the letter I received from Washington

Washington March 17, 1919

 

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

R.R. No 1 Box 64

Wichita Kans.

 

Madam.

 

On reply to your letter of which was addressed to Second Lieut. 130th Field Artillery concerning Private Edward A. Sauzek, Battery C. 130th Field Artillery who died October 11, 1918, from wounds received in action the following report is received from the commander abroad.

 

" The records of this office show Private Edward A. Sauzek #146655, to have died of wounds on October 11, 1918, at Base Hospital  #1 and to have been buried on October 13, 1918, in Ceniture des Bartona Vichy, Alier France, American plot, Grave #58 grave marked by name peg and identification tags. Reported to Washington per casualty telegram 291.

 

I am enclosing here with the letter from the Capt. of the 130th Field Artillery.

 

Very respectfully

P. C. Harries

The Adjutant General

 

But the number is not right they gave, his right number is #146-6551.

 

Page 31.

 

This is a copy of the letter I received from Capt. Battery C, 130 Field Artillery

American E. F. January 14, 1919.

 

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kansas

R. R. No 1 Box 64

 

Madam.

 

In reply to your letter of November 21, 1918 regarding death of your son Private Edward A. Sauzek can only state that he was wounded in action by shell splinters on September 25, 1918 near Newville, France.

 

This office has never been notified of his death but this letter will be forwarded to you through the Central Records Office, in Paris, France, where all information of casualties is recorded

 

Walter H. Richards

Capt. 130th F.A.

 

One of the boys wrote to us that he had been wounded on September 24th about midnight he was with him talked to him after he was wounded and that he didn't think it was serious. So you can take either date.

 

Page 32.

 

Wichita Kans April 29, 1919.

 

Kansas State Historical Society

William E Connelley Sec.

 

Dear Sir:

 

I am sending you in a separate package some more copies of the letters of Edward A. Sauzek that you wrote while he was in Camp Funston Kans and camp Doniphan Okla..

 

He stayed about one month at Camp Funston then was transferred to Camp Doniphan.

 

I still have some more letters but they are all about the same telling us how he was getting along and about his work, I just copy them they way he wrote them so you can take out whatever you can use.

 

Enclosed herewith you will find two copies of letters I received from Capt. 130th Field Artl.and one of Washington you will see that the number they gave me is not right they gave me #146655 and his number is #1466551, I also got a letter from the Red Cross from the hospital where he died she gave me his number right from Washington #1466551, but it was always wrong from across, that is why I have been waiting so long with them letters, was waiting for more information.

 

Very Sincerely

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kans.

R. R. No 1 Box 64

 

Page 33.

 

[A May 2, 1919 typewritten letter addressed to Mrs. Minnie Sauzek from the K.H.S]

 

Page 34.

 

Wichita Kan. May 1 1919

 

Kansas State Historical Society

William E Connelley Sec.

 

Dear Sir:

 

I sent you a package of letters yesterday afternoon of Edward A. Sauzek.

 

Enclosed you will find one more, I was in a hurry to get them of so I overlooked this one so I am sending it right away, so it may get there about the same time you get that package.

 

Very Sincerely

 

Mrs. Minnie Sauzek

Wichita Kans

R. R. No 1 Box 64.

 

Page 35.

 

5.00 Fri. eve

May 10, 1918

 

Dear Mother:

I will write a few lines this evening we are still riding and will for the next 5 days yet to Long Island New York or Camp Merritt New Jersey we stoped about one hour at Ft. Scott we all got off and marched through town for exercise there were many people there most of them from Pittsburg Kans is most of the men in our battery are from there. We will get to Kansas City sometime after dark this evening, I am on guard this evening, we have to watch so no one sreps off of the car at the stations that they stop, that is all we have to do it is easy, I cannot sleep anyway in these chair cars well it is a long trip but it sure is great it is worth a lot to everyone of us we will sure see some great scenery will before the trip is over, I sure was glad to get out of Okla the dust was bowling a fright last night when we left, so you had a good rain Sunday night we had only a springle but we had some storm a cyclone, I came home Sunday night from Lawton at 1130 and I just got in bed and it was the worst lightning that I ever saw and just as I got into bed I heard a roar it was nearly perfect still and it kept getting louder it sounded just like that time when they have the cyclone at Andale but it was a lot louder, and it ripped a few tents

 

Page 36.

 

that were loose it took the tops off of several boxcars over at Ft. Sill it did not come quite direct over us but it tore up things good, north of Ft. Sill, I sure thought that we were gone I stood at the door as it went over I could see the clout every time that it lightened it was a real cloud. Kansas sure looks different than Okla it looks like they had more rain, we will be in Missouri tomorrow. I guess we will be through Chicago by the time you get this letter.

 

Well I took three men out of this battery over to Lawton or rather met them over there and they put in their application to join the K. of C. this coming Sunday but it did not do any good as it was to late, they postponed it now, it was to bad that they did not get to join, they thought I will do well if I get two application in for them but I got three but it did not do any good.

 

Well it is nearly suppertime we eat right in our seats we use our mess kits they bring it to us through the car and then they bring dishwater to wash them, it is all handy they have an extra card to do the cooking in.

 

How is everybody? I am fine as can be tell everybody that I am on my way to France and am feeling fine and just having a great time.

 

Page 37.

 

You will all have to take care of yourselves, I take care of myself the best I can.

 

Did you get that picture that I sent Sunday morning. I bought it after I wrote that letter to you, in the place where that soldier stands you can put my picture there, cut it out and paste it on or over it that is the way they showed me to do, maybe one of them big pictures are not to big, but you do not need to fix it right away and frame it, there is no hurry I will be back sometime later.

 

Well that will be all for this time I will close for this time with love and best wishes to all

 

From Edw.

 

Page 38.

 

Camp Doniphan

May 3, 1918.

 

Dear Sister Hazel.

 

Well I guess it is about time for me to write, but I really have been too busy to write. Of course I know you will believe me.

 

I received your letter some time ago, one evening when I was on guard. I got it over there, or rather it was brought to me. I was on guard twice that week, and worked over at the quartermaster dept. Worked there at all day today, bailing out old worn-out leggins. 65 or 70 of us got to go over there was a week to work. It sure is a nice place to work only 8 hour. I would like to be transferred over there but no chance for me, as I have drilled too long. They won't take anyone that has drilled as long as I have. The new drafted men will have a chance at that, but I am an old regular now.

 

We spent all day Wednesday at

 

Page 39.

 

the rifle range, we sure did a lot of firing. I fired 89 rounds, some fired as high as 100. We had nothing but rapid firing had to shoot ten rounds in one minute and had to reload twice during the one minute. It was fast work and the eargils showed it at least mine did. I would only hit three or four out of ten. It sure is hard to do, to hit anything in that short a time. We fired from all ranges 100, 200 and 300 yard ranges. We had German helmets on the kind of hat they wore to shoot at, at the 100 yard range and from the 200 and 300 ys. there was a little head on a pair of shoulders a little above the ground it is great sport.

 

Well you not like it because I did not say more about the boy. Well I will say this much how is the whole family also the Junior that's about all I can say so you can tell him Hello! fo me..

 

Say I saw Speck Swartland last night and he said that he saw you, and

 

Page 40.

 

that you told him to tell me to write, and good luck or something like that on my trip. Well I have not started and I do not know when yet. But we are ready to go a time. But I cannot see myself leaving this place (never). If we do leave I do not think we will ever go across to France. Well it does not make any difference to me, but I would just as soon stay on this side of the water as I have not lost anything in France. But I would like to see those French girl, but do not care to go that far. I think I can find one around Wichita don't you?

 

Well I guess this stuff don't interest you much so I will quit for this time. With best wishes and luck to you all.

 

Your Brother Edw.

 

Page 41.

 

A.E.F. New York

June 21, 1918

 

Dear Sister Hazel.

 

I will write a few lines this afternoon to let you know that I have not forgotten you.

 

Well how are you? I am just as fine as can be, never felt better in my life even if I am seven or eight thousand miles from home. I know one thing I would never live in this country nor in England. I will take the good old USA and all the USA girls. I can stand and talk to one for an hour and never know what she is talking about.  I have changed my mind a bit since I landed over here.

 

Has Gus sold my motorcycle yet, if he leaves it stand it will be rested up before I get back, as it will probably be sometime yet. This is my last sheet of paper so I will half to stop.

 

Your Brother Edw.

 

Page 42.

 

Camp Doniphan

Feb. 25, 1918.

 

Dear Gus.

 

Well how is everything in Wichita by now. Things down here are the same yet. It is lots warmer though than it has been, but we are having some March winds.

 

You should have been here this morning, you would have seen something you never saw before or ever will. We had an inspection. Got up at four had to roll our make up consisting of two blankets, raincoat, a suit of underwear, pair of socks, one towel, toothbrush, soap, comb and tent pins, and we were on the drill grounds at six thirty, for the parade and it sure was grand doings. We passed in what is called a review the General of the 35th Division there sure was a bunch of men, about seven thousand men in all 130th Regiment 129 Regiment 128 Reg. Enginers and a lot more. We pass the

 

Page 43.

 

General in a Battery front, we were led by the band and then the Col. of our regiment. Each regiment was led by a Col. and each had a band. Battery C had the best line in our reg. It also was the best battery as the Col. told us that. We got through at ten o'clock and the Col. said we sure did good work, and he said that there was no drill for us before noon. About that time the wind changed to the west and we had a real dust storm, so after dinner we had orders to stay in our tents. So I got me some good sleep, that was the first time we ever got to do that, when I woke up I was covered with about quarter an inch of dirt, it was not snow but red dirt. My face was just black and ever since I got up have had my goggles on, and am going to keep them on till tomorrow sometime till the wind goes down. I will have to keep them on all night.

 

I am glad this day is over, that

 

Page 44.

 

is the inspection. Everyone of us had a full uniform, it sure was a fine looking bunch of soldiers. I never saw such a fine bunch before. And I did not think we were soldiers yet, but we sure are, each reg. carried a big flag, and each battery carried a flag with its Battery initial and regiment. Ours Bat. C. 130 F.A. It was a grand sight but we sure did work for it.

 

They are expecting a change within the next ten days it is weather we stay here or move to some other camp or go to France. It has been some straight news that we will be on our way to France, within a month, we will know soon.

 

Well we had a great surprise this afternoon about four o'clock we were called into mess hall and were some surprised in a minute when we saw Gov. Capper of Kansas step in, he made a short speech. He came here to visit one day he sure hit a grand day

 

Page 45.

 

so we all marched out in single file and shook hands with him and told him our name. That is more than you will ever get to do, to shake hands with our Gov.

 

How is Hazel? and did you get home all right. This letter is for both of you as I have not time to write to each of you. So answer soon.

 

I close with best wishes to you. As they are going to pull off a boxing match now. I am at the YMCA.

 

Edw.

 

Page 46.

 

Camp Funston Sept 24, 1917.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop a few lines this evening to let you know that this sure is some place we did not get up here until Sunday morning at 11 o'clock we had to lay over at Newton 3 hours and they put on about five carloads more men and picked up some more on the line by the time we got up here we had a special train of about 14 cars of about 550 men and we had breakfast at Abilene about 8 o'clock we stopped about 1 1/2 hour there, we sure had a time on the train we hollowed nearly all the way up we woke them all up along the road we never run any more than about 15 miles an hour any time because we were about 9 hours from the time we left Wichita until we got to Abilene but we stoped a long time in Newton, we sure had a lot to eat we had a grade of apples, big box of bananas, 4 boxes of cigars, one carton of cigarettes two boxes of gum, about a dozen small boxes of grapes, and about that many of blue plumps, 1 box of lemons.

 

And the first thing we got there we got in line and we stood in the sun from 11 until 12 o'clock and then called roll.-And go in old small

 

Page 47.

 

building and take a wash I call it a ice shower bath right from the pump that cold they have not got any warm water yet and won't have any for a long time and we take baths twice a week but we can take it oftener if we want.

 

They gave us a woolen suit of underwear a shirt socks and a pair of overalls & a mess pan & up and got dinner at 130 each one washes our own dishes, today we got our shoes, hat comb brush & toothbrush & a sack to put our clothes and everything in. This is sure a great suit we have now, we lined up for our examination on Sunday afternoon all of our bunch are all together yet in one brigade but there were a good many in our place before we got in so there is about 100 or more in our room. Boylen and I put our cots together for about a month I guess, we did not do any training yet but we will start about tomorrow for we are divided into squads.

 

We went out looking for Irwin Bingham

 

Page 48.

 

but we could not find him, but when we got back he was in our room.

 

A trainload of about 1000 came in this morning 25 cars there is about 500 to a thousand common every day.

 

Well for how I like it, I like it just fine it can't be beat tell that everybody that is so far and by watching others it does not look hard.

 

Well I will close as the lights go out it 5 minutes 930

 

From your son

 

Address Edward A. Sauzek

Co 19th 164 Depot Brigade

Camp Funston Kans.

 

Page 49.

 

Camp Funston Kans Sept 27, 1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening to let you know that I am fairly well, I got a little headache from my vaccination yesterday it was swelled a good bit this morning but that is just a little thing up here they gave me to scratches on the arm and they stuck the needle two inch under the skin just below the left arm, two out of our bunch fainted and the day before three fainted as soon as they got out of the building.

 

This sure is a big place we are off to go anywhere in camp from 6 o'clock after supper until 9 o'clock but we are not busy all day but we have got to be here all the time we got to take turn in working in the kitchen when we are called we got to get up at three thirty and work all day on till about 7 o'clock in the evening, my turn will soon be next I guess I worked two hours one morning scrubbing the kitchen, we might get good exercise that is, it is good when our arms are not to sore, but they got us out this morning and run us for a half-mile before breakfast with our stiff arms and sides, I did not sleep much last night could not rest my arm at all and after breakfast we run another half-mile and had some arm exercise but those that had to sore arm did not have to do it just watch, everybody in our bunch seem to like

 

Page 50.

 

It, I like it fine the exercise good when a person feels good. But I will be all right in the morning, tell Gus I will write him as soon as I get time we do not hardly get time only in the evening and we always go down to the stores after supper and get some cookies to eat we got nearly a mile to go the meals we get here are not much good the cooks are no good the bread is just like toasted about a week or more old and the last two or three days it all taste like mothballs they keep it to close to them. I guess they all go down and get something to eat after supper it sure was rotten tonight that is why I went down and got something else.

 

Well we have not got our uniforms yet but we will get them before long and we got only two blankets and they told us this morning to send home for a comfort or by one here, but I do not think they got much here. So if you want to you can send one, and send that gray sweater to, we will be allowed to wear our sweater for a while that is all I need now, we have got our raincoats we use them the other day. I forgot to say that I got your letter this evening mail comes in twice a day.

 

The quartet is singing now they sure can sing good Edwards is in it they sing about a half a do when zen times a day, it seems just like a party we are all together and know each other. You do not need to be in a hurry to sent that it is not cold yet.

 

From Edw.

 

 

 

 

Page 51.

 

Camp Funston 9/30/17.

 

Dear Mother:

 

 I will drop you a few lines this evening and answer your letter which I received yesterday, well how are all you all? I am fine got a little cold but I get rid of that alright we will get used to this life before long, well we were all off from Saturday noon and all day today but yesterday we had to stay around our building but we did not have anything to do but we got to be here certain times to report.

 

Mrs. Edwards was up here today all day she said our mail is so long getting down that there, this makes my fourth letter that I wrote to you, it is so slow getting out here, I guess it is so much, but we get our mail alright I got your last letter yesterday.

 

We are all having a good time yet Irwin Bingham and Francis Baylen and I went out for a walk this afternoon up on the hills there sure are some hills here they are about 400 feet high we went on top it looks just like the card I got from Irwin we can see all over the camp it sure is a sight to see.

 

The Knights of Columbus got a hall up here just finished but not plastered they have mass in their they had it at seven this morning but we cannot

 

Page 52.

 

get there that early as it is about a mile away as we do not get up until 615 on Sundays, but next Sunday they will have it at 7 and 10. Baylen and I went there this morning at 8 o'clock, we went in for a a while anyway, the priest was there yet and good others, he told us to all come back next Sunday he was dressed in uniform. We had to go to church in our overalls and shirtsleeves, I never did dream of that.

 

I will close for this time

goodbye Edw.

 

Page 53.

 

Camp Funston 10/2/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

ill write a few lines this evening I am here in the YMCA writing this there are about one hundred writing here tonight everything is free here they have a stage here a piano the music is going all the time singing, violin playing, it sure is nice, they have about ten of them in the camp there is always something doing there sure is a crowd out at night, they crowd so close together around the stores that the pick pockets are shure and work, they caught seven the other night, a man that come up with those got picked last night of thirty dollars  and another of forty dollars but they are catching them fast.

 

Well how are you? I am just fine we had a lot of drilling today and we got in about four o'cl and we all cleaned up shaved and took a bath it is just fine now we get used to it, we each got to take care of ourselves, we get our second  vaccination about Saturday ten days after the first one another bunch in our building took theirs yesterday afternoon and they sure are sick today some get up for meals and some got out in lines this evening and they had to carry in three in ten minutes time and some from the supper table the first shot we got ten thousand grains into our system and second five hundred

 

 Page 54.

 

thousand and third one million so it gets worse all the time, O, we will all have to stand it.

 

We had some good speaking yesterday we took a hike into the hills yesterday and a lot others, we all got together on one side of the hill about three thousand it shure was a bunch and a French officer spoke to us just come here from France he knows all about it he said we will all get to see France but that we will get a lot of training behind the trenches, he said there are three million French soldiers in the trenches every day and two million British and three million training behind the lines he said there are only one killed or badly wounded out of every hundred, that is not so very many that is the way it is now because they are gaining all the time on Germany, a while back a half-dozen got killed, he said it is easy now he said some of the French soldiers have been fighting two and three years and are still fighting, well we will all take it in good humor, who never did see a jollier bunch then the soldiers always singing, I like it just fine, better each day.

 

Well how are all the people around there? I got a letter from brother Geo. yesterday and I wrote him one Sunday and I got one from Minnie Kabureck tonight and a card from Ralph Boyd. Well I will close for this time with love,

 

From  Edw. Sauzek.

 

Page 55.

 

Camp Funston 10/3/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines this evening to let you know that I received those packages this evening it sure is good. But we are having a lot of better eating now than we did when we first came here it sure was bad, we had a good supper tonight and they are having a lot better bread to, but we do not get any cookies nor jelly or jam, but we get molasses well I will have my own bread now for a day or two.

 

Well I think I got all of your letters, this one today was the fifth. Tell Gus I am still looking for that box of cigars as we have a lot of time to smoke, but we are not allowed to smoke outside of the building only inside unless we are way out drilling. When there is a fire close somewhere they call us all out and we will circle the building and keep on a watch so that no sparks it's our building we was called out the other night about 8 o'clock but the fire was way off we could not even see it but we had to get out.

 

Well l exercise size is about the same yet we play ball every afternoon about one hour just to exercise. Yes we wash our old clothes it is easy we have not got much.

 

Well I guess I will not write for a day or

 

Page 56.

 

two as we got all vaccinated again tonight after supper my arm is getting a little stiff now this is our second shot under the arm and my vaccination did not take so they scratched me again a little deeper, I guess I will be sick tomorrow morning and stiff so I cannot get out of bed well we are all of all day tomorrow we do not have to train when we get shot.

 

Well I will close for this time as I am going to bed.

 

Love to you all

From Ed.

 

Page 57.

 

Camp Funston Oct 16 1917.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will answer your letter this afternoon as we are off all day today we got our vaccination yesterday afternoon again I have been vaccinated for the third time, it did not take the other two times I do not know if this one will take yet or not I won't know for about four or five days, we take them every ten days mine was always healed up in five or six days, but the inoculation for Typhoid is a lot worse they give us that every time we are vaccinated we had the third shot now yesterday they do not work us for a day then, as we cannot, there is just a big lump swollen under my left arm, I cannot raise my arm above my head today, but in two days, I cannot feel anything of it anymore, but this is our last till we get to France, one out of our company went right down after he got out of the hospital it effects some worse than others, this one did not give me the headache like the last one did.

 

Well I do not know how long we will stay here but not over a month I know maybe not longer than a week we will only get about twenty four hours notice but there is nothing for certain, but it is sure we will leave before the winter is over the Co. next to us the twentieth are going about

 

Page 58.

 

tomorrow to Ft. Sill and Arkansas well I know one thing, and that is I will get back when the war is over, but I will try again this Saturday if I am not on some guard duty. I guess you know that I was on guard duty Sat. all day and night untill eight Sunday morning it sure was a tiresome job.

 

Well Baylen and I went over to Junction City Sunday morning about nine and went to church at ten, they have a nice big church over there.

 

Well the eats are a lot better now as they had a lot of it inspected and the bread is good and fresh now.

 

Well I will have a lot to eat for a while I got both of your boxes.

 

I will write Geo a letter tonight if nobody comes. I am just fine as can be feel better than ever before as it as it is nothing to do at all from what I used to do.

 

I will close with love

 

From Ed.

 

Page 59.

 

Camp Funston 10/20/17.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will answer your letter which I received yesterday, I thought maybe I would get off but they won't let anybody off as we are due to leave here most any time but I guess we won't go to Ark. but we are going to Ft. Sill as that is quite sure now that is what our officer said yesterday, we are not all fitted out yet we leave sometime between Mon. and Wed. 63 out of our company left this morning for Demings New Mexico the Nebraska and South Dakota men and the Missourians and Kansas men are going to Ft. Sill. The reason we are leaving here, they are going to bring a lot of Negroes here they cannot get along with them in the South.

 

Well all of the Sedgwick county men are not all going to Ft. Sill they keep a few here out of each company. John Edwards is going to stay as he is Cpl. Francis Baylen is going with us well most all of our going and they said that we will be together down there, it is as camp just like this we are not right in Ft. Sill, it is a camp just built Camp Doniphan is the name of it, well I guess it will be a little warmer down there. I do not know if we will come through Wichita or not, but we may if Gus wants to know maybe he can find out down there we may stop there a while but we do not know

 

Page 60.

 

anything about it an what train we go or anything or exactly when we leave we will just get orders to pack up and that is all.

 

I am getting a sore arm now my third vaccination is talking but I guess it won't last over two or three weeks we are sure having some cold weather up here the last few days there was ice froze about1/8 of an inch thick or more this morning. They took us all for a long hike Friday morning we left here at 815 and walk over to Ft. Riley and back a distance of 10 miles or better, there and back and give us only 10 min. rest at Ft. Riley before we started back we got here at 1130 walked all the time except those 10 min. but it did not hurt any of us but we got a little tired but we all feel fine today.

 

We had about an inch of rain Wed. night it sure was a real storm lightning and thundered and blew hard the water is standing yet, we have not got heat in our building yet we have to keep on our coats and run around to keep warm and we have no hot water yet I did not have my hands of hot water since I left home for shaving either but they will have it in about two weeks, but that don't do us any good, I hope it will be better where we go.

 

They have a fine church in Junction City there were four other Catholic in our company besides Baylen and I, two left this morning and only one will go

 

Page 61.

 

with Baylen and I to Ft. Sill and the other one stays here.

 

Well I guess I will close and run around a while to keep my feet warm before they freeze, it did not freeze any ice morning, but it is getting a little colder right along since this morning the clouds look like snow.

 

Tell Gus to keep my motorcycle covered up so it won't rain or snow on it, I may get back to write it again.

 

Will close for this time with best wishes

 

From your son

Edw.

 

Page 62.

 

Camp Doniphan 10/24/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well we finally got here to Ft. Sill but it sure was a slow trip, we left Monday at 1120 and got to this camp at 6  Tue. night we traveled about 750 miles altogether since we left Camp Funston we are living in the tents now 8 and 12 to a tent and it is not any warmer down here that it was up there we ate supper on the train and we had to carry all of our blankets and things 3 miles to we got to the Field Artillery we are all in the Field Artillery but in different companys. I am in Co. C. this place is lots dirtier than camp Funston it sure was cold in our tent last night we did not have any stove and the wind blowed in all around but we worked all morning so we have got it tight now and a stove but nothing but a ground-floor but a little later on we will have floor, this is the first work that I have done for so long my arms are so nervous I can hardly write from triving stakes and handling pick. I have not seen anybody I know yet and I don't think I will for some time as I want to get some rest and sleep it sure was a tuff night last night, but I have enough covers for a while yet you do not need to send anything, tell I write and tell you. If anybody wants my address you can give it to them as we will be busy for a while at first. We sure have good eats here. Well I will close and write all the news later write soon.

 

From Ed.

 

Page 63.

 

Camp Doniphan Oct 29, 1917.

 

Dear Brother:

 

I received your letter this noon and also your candy it sure is fine candy, it sure comes in handy, I still have a few cigars yet they sure are fine smokes and also got mother's letter and cakes and pairs and apples those cakes are sure good, it sure comes in handy for lunch, we are sure getting good eatings here now a lot better than we ever did get at Funston and we all sure have got good appetite, I eat more here than I ever did. The training sure is good. I like it a lot better than the infantry we get up at quarter of six and out in line at six then we run a little over a block out in the training field and take a few physical exercise and then run back it is just fun.

 

I took my first gun drill this morning it sure is exciting it keeps a person a thinking where his post is and where to change there are eight men to a gun squad we just drill on some of the canon wagons and shell wagons our Bat. has not got any horses we just drill where they stand it is just fun but it sure keeps us a stepping keeps us warmed up these cold mornings, I do not think we will have any horses this winter I hope not, so we do not have to take care of them this winter we will pull our guns by truck if we do any target work this winter, in France they

 

Page 64.

 

won't use any horses at all for the Art. nothing but tracters we are in the heavy Art. when we are in service we are about seven miles behind the infantry the first trenches and the drilling is not near so hard. I like this life just fine if we only had better weather or warmer weather, you never did see such a wind as we have down here we have got to have two straps on our hats one under the chin and the other behind the head, about 5 o'clock last night a dust storm came up like we had that Friday about two months before I came in the Army only a lot worse and if they had every came of than you would never see it again and it kept that up all night and a lot worse it blowed down about a half a dozen tents I thought ours would come down any minute we went out several times and drove the pegs down the ground is hard as rock, as it never rains here we all slept with our clothes on for we might have to get out any time some of them slept with their gogles on I would of to if I had a pair we were covered with about a quarter of an inch of dirt when we got up, that is just how bad it is here. I think our stay is short here as some say we will go to some border before very long, but if we stay here I am sure we will get ten days of Xmas at least us drafted men we are suppose

 

Page 65.

 

to get 10 days when we are in three months, if you can get off you and Arthur Wood ought to come down some Sat. or Sunday you would see something. Well the airplanes did not fly today but we heard the cannons roar just the light Art. about 5 or 6 miles away the three inch gun ours are the 6 inch guns and we can not hear the infantry they are too far away.

 

Well I seen Fred Bachman last Sat. night and Byron Skean and his brother Lloyd Roll is here but I have not seen him yet and Harold Davis, Ed Hodges, Harpster all of Valley Knechenmisters Fred Taylor of Wichita and some more I cannot think of.

 

Well I guess this will be all for tonight I am feeling just fine and having a good time as ever so if you ever come down let me know.

 

I will close with best wishes from

 

Brother Ed.

 

Page 66.

 

Camp Doniphan Oct 31 1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter yesterday evening I will try and answer your question if I can I am feeling fine, my arm does not bother me at all anymore I am getting it limbered up good and and my vaccination is healed up to, so you do not need to worry about my arm. I like this place real well now, but we have some real bad weather sometimes, today it is still an warm we did not have to wear our coats this morning when we went on a hike of 5 miles I am getting used to walking now, it is so nice today it seems like we are not in Okla. it sure gets hot in those tents when the sun shines on them like today I guess we are off this afternoon, but I guess we got to sign our payroll. I am going to do some washing this afternoon as it takes too long to get it when we send it to the laundry and they charge double $.40  for a suit of underwear $.20 for a shirt, I will do it myself before I pay that much there is a town close to us between 3 and 4 miles and the jitneys charge $.40 one way the name of the town is Lawton Okla.

 

Well our tent is warm now we have board floor now we put them in the last Sat. we will boarded up part ways soon as we get lumber I am not a bit cold in here now. I keep good and warm now it was only the first night and it never did get that cold here again since then we have the little army stoves they sure make good heat, I like it, it sure is nice this evening it makes a person feel fine

 

Page 67.

 

when we walk at night in the moonlight in our camp and here in the tents singing some tents playing a violin and all kinds of music, seated around the stove smoking and having candlelight, we burn wood in the stoves they have a big pile of wood pieces about four foot long and then we take turns about cutting it up with the hand buck saw we cut up just enough for one night and we will have electric light soon this sure is a happy bunch they all seem to like it we have not got any warm water yet when we wash our face, we get a bucket full of warm water from the kitchen that is enough for all of us in our tent.

 

Well you do not need to worry about me because I am not there, I cannot be at home all the time.  I like this just fine now, and am feeling fine, I never had to report to a Doc. or get any medicine yet since I have been in the Army, so you don't need to send anything.

 

I will close with best wishes

 

From Ed.

 

Page 68.

 

Camp Doniphan Nov 5 1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter this noon and also from Funston we just got that mail today dated the twentieth it was quite old.

 

Well Gus and Hazel got here Sunday. I did not think they would ever get this far, but they got here at 930. I was looking for them though, they wrote me a letter and I got it Thursday night, they still look the same, but look like they come from some cold climate it is not been very cold here anytime yet since we have been here it is never went as low as 20 I do not believe as the leaves are not near all off the trees yet it was a fairly nice day yesterday, we have had real nice weather all week and also since today it is warm here in the morning we went out at 545 this morning without any coat I guess it was about 36 something like that, that is real warm here with our heavy underclothes and woolen shirts they put us on the gun drill this afternoon and keep us there from 330 until after five we are supposed to be off at four but they worked us over time, I sure like that kind of drill it is all doubletime work every move we make is on the run they kept us at it steady for 20 min. at a time it sure made me swe it was real warm about sun down. Any time Geo. wants to come down and tell

 

Page 69.

 

him to let me know ahead of time so I can let him know if I am on or not on some duty, but it is to far for you to come, I will try and come home sometime, we are all having a real good time we do not get a chance to get lonesome.

 

They sure brought a lot of good things to eat those grapes were just fine and apples that all come in handy after we come in from drilling.

 

And goggles and glasses, towels, socks they all looked nice. I washed Sat. a shirt a suit of underclothes towels, socks, handkerchiefs dishtowels, I got them nice and clean, I got a bucket of hot water at the kitchen and put them in got a bar of soap and borrowed a tub and board here in our tent and rubbed it clean and put up a rope in our tent and dried it just pull the shirt straight at collar and cuffs and let it dry it looks good, so I have a hole suit case full of clean clothes now I am rich, we sure all have a good time, when we get out and wash it looks like camp life. I like it better every day. I got two boxes of candy one from Hazel and one from Mrs. House and a box of cigars from Gus. I just smoked the last one of Geo. before they came, and we had a good dinner at Lawton. Well I will close for this time, I want to write to Mimmie yet tonight. With best wishes,

 

From Ed.

 

Page 70.

 

Camp Doniphan Nov.14 1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter last night and seen in that, that girl died what is the matter that there are so many sick, it would be different with us as we are out nearly all the time, but everybody seems to be in real good shape at least our battery. I am feeling just fine they gave us another blanket today so I got three blankets now and your comfort and a canvas dust cover and I can still put my heavy overcoat on top I never will get cold, we are sure having fine weather now.

 

There are six inch guns on the way here now they got a 6 inch shell here on exhibition with the side cut open so we can see what it is made of it is about 2 foot long and six inches in diameter and weighs 120 lbs. they sure will be nice to handle all day long. Well it will be a while yet before we will have to do that.

 

Well we took another examination this morning heart & lung it took them about 30 seconds to do it I passed slick and fine as they did not ask me any question at all. Well by the time you wrote about them cookies they were all gone. I must close as I will want to send this tonight with love and best wishes

 

From Edw.

 

Page 71. 

 

Camp Doniphan

11/19/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your two letters this noon. It started in to rain this morning and is now 630 and has not stopped yet. We could not stand retreat all we did was go to the mess all for supper. It was dark there as the power was off on account of the storm.

 

Henry Allen was down here and made us a speech at the YMCA he just came back from France and gave an interesting talk on that country.

 

Tell Paw that I want to farm the place when I get out of the Army, and I think I will before long.

 

Well it is after eight o'clock and still raining but not so hard. I must close with love and best wishes to all

 

Edw.

 

Page 72.

 

Camp Doniphan 11/21/1917

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines this afternoon as we are of this afternoon it is Wed. I am at the YM writing this I am sending you a little souvenir of the calars I will have a picture taken a little later on to put in there or any picture will almost fit I guess some of mine at home but will have one in a uniform, as I want to get a good uniform and keep it for all the time a remembrance of the war of 1917.

 

Well how is everybody? Everything is fine here I am feeling just fine. Allen sure made a fine speech here the other night he said we will all get to see France and a lot sooner than a lot of us expect to he said it sure is tough over there he was there three months and just came back a short time ago he says the war won't end before three years or maybe five we will get to see a lot of the world by that time.

 

I just wished I would've joined the coast Art. last July. I would be along the coast now where it is nice I think we will be at some coast by spring, some report is out that are Batt. will move to Topeka for winter as they have buildings there and then in spring move us to some far-off place, but nobody knows. I just keep nice and warm as I have enough blankets. Well I will close and will write again when I hear from you.

 

Edward.

 

Page 73.

 

Camp Doniphan 11/30/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your two letters one Thanksgiving evening and the other today noon so will answer both in one we sure had a fine day Thanksgiving day, and a lot to eat, and a lot of company, two special cars came from Pittsburg Kans as there are a lot of Pittsburg men here in the Battery the mess hall was all decorated up and I got a list of what we had for dinner, we had turkey, baked sweet potatoes, mashed Irish  potatoes, scalloped corn, gravy, cranberry sauce, butter, bread, fruitcake, pumpkin pie, apples, oranges, cellery, olives english walnuts, hazelnuts, popcorn balls, ice cream, puritan and Bevo. Coffee, cigars, and sigarettes, it sure was a dinner, nobody ever expected that much, we all eat company and all, about 250 eat all together in our Batt. but only 200 get to the tables at once, we have been getting dandy eats all the time, we certainly will never starve here the turkey was cooked it just to the top notch, each one of us got one package of cigarettes 2 cigars one bottle of Bevo. and all the turkey we could eat, the table was all set when we went in we had it at one o'clock, I never did see a table fixed up like that it sure looks nice to get at one end of the table and looked down and see one hundred bottles lined up on the table, we sure filled up.

 

Page 74.

 

I also got your cake last night, I still have a little of that left and you can tell Geo. I got his box also Wed. it sure was a good fruitcake and good candy and your cake was fine, it all come in fine shape, I have just started his box of cigars they are shure dandys they are one of the best smokes that I ever smoked, you can let him read this as I have not got time to write him as they have been keeping us awful busy the last few days, we go out and 130 in the afternoon and hike for a while then a short lecture them from 330 till 430 we play games running games of all kinds so as to get in at 4 but it is a new rule now everyone of the Batt. Do that now, then we eat at 5 and retreat at 530 it used to be at 5 but it is changed again to 530 now, and then if we bath we got to do it between 6 and 7 in the morning, I just got through taking one that cool waters just fine, we will have hot water by next Sat. I am feeling just fine, well about the picture frame I went over to the YM tonight to see about it he said they took them out the next day but they are laying over at Ft. Sill as they come in by the thousands and the government refused to take them all, so they are sending them just a few at a time, you will get it sometime, I put the address on both sides and the return on and stamps I do not think it will get lost

 

Page 75.

 

We sure had a bad day Tue. for trench digging it rained nearly all day it rained better than one inch it started when we were out at the pits about eleven, not very hard but at three it started in hard and we left for home, we had our raincoats on, it took us about two hours to come back five miles as it got slippery, but we got a little wet before we got here as we had to unbutton our coats on the bottom so we could walk, but my clothes were not dry yet when I got back as I wash them the night before but I put them up to the stance and they dried in the short time, and then the next day we had inspection of the whole Battalion out on the drill ground we had to take our overcoats hours three blankets and our shelter half and it had to be all wrapped up in the shelter half just so, and also our mess kits and when we got there we had to unroll it all again and lay everything in place and after it was over we had to all to roll up again, we have all kinds of stunts to go through, in the morning is inspection again and we have to police up all the grounds and take the tops off our tents again and I got to shave and then wash in the afternoon and then Sunday morning I am going to Lawton to church so I will be busy for a while, and about those sweaters you do not need to be in a hurry, as it is not a bit cold here they are treating us better now than they did they let us wear our overcoats when it is cold enough, I close with best wishes

 

From Edw.

 

Page 76.

 

Camp Doniphan

12/2/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

Recd your letter yesterday and saw that you got the picture frame but in bad shape. You can put any picture in it. I have been wanting to get one with a full uniform taken but the suit the government issued is too small.

 

Baylen and I went to Lawton to church this morning and it is just a little country church. They also had a lecture on what good work the K. of C. is doing in these camps. I believe I would like to join as they have so many thing going on and is a place to go.

 

I got another picture, it has the colors picture of the presidents on it, also the captain and officers names also all privates of this Battery. It also has room for my picture.

 

We may move about the 18th of this month the Col. told our Capt. Sat. and it is all over the camp now. I got a transfer Sat. from the Bat. into special detail with it is work just like the signal Corps we send messages by arm and hand signals also bags. I don't think I will like it will study in afternoon and have no gun practice. I am not going to take much interest in it. Well I will close with best wishes.

 

Edw.

 

Page 77.

 

Camp Doniphan 12/9/17

 

Dear Brother:

 

I received your letter the other evening and seeing that everything was running smooth I am writing this at the K. of C. hall at Lawton I am not a K. of C. yet but am thinking of joining as soon as they put on the class here they was to have it today but did not have it for some reason or other they do not know yet when, I think it will do me good to join we have some doings every once in a while here and after I get out of this once, Baylen was here with me he just left for camp, he is coming in again tonight and we are going to a show we left Camp this morning at 830 I got a pass so I did not go home but we will both be back by ten tonight we went to church this morning at ten, this place sure is a nice place to loaf nice and warm in here it sure was cold here Fri. night or Sat morning the thermometer was down to five above zero here in Lawton. No it never gets cold here in Ft. Sill, it sure keeps us busy cutting would but I did not get cold that night I covered up all from head to foot and did not look out till 545 in the morning when the bugle blowed but it sure was awful when I was out all night before, I am still doing the special detail work I am in another tent now there is

 

Page 78.

 

A good bunch in there I got an upper berth now I never have fell out yet it is a spring cot. I sure had my share of walking Thur. night and this Fri. I carried all of my blankets, mess kit, and four flags signal flags it was hard to carry messages after night we were not allowed to use lights only starlight above as it is five miles to the trenches and then I had to go one mile farther and this south west side of the signal mountain over rocks through thick timber and if I ever lost my way it would be all off some done that and took them more than two hours to get back, after I was off at 1230 I spred my blankets on some rocks and just got covered up good when within about a mile someone fired a cannon three times in succession and nobody knew what it was for it sure did roar through the timber but I never uncovered to see what was going on as I sure was tired it sure sounded like the Germans were coming and I never got breakfast till 1030 that morning and it sure was dirty and I set right down on the open prairie with my back against the wind and eat it with the grass a whirling around me and in the feed but I just picked it out and kept on eating but as the blizzard came up at 2 Fri. noon we started back by the time we got halfway it was sleeting raining and

 

Page 79.

 

snowing and blowing as cold it sure was a fright coming back, so that when went around to the south Sat. afternoon and it changed to the north this morning again and I guess it is below twenty now I heard it was 16 below in Wichita.

 

Well I went to town last night and bought me a sweater for $7.50 it sure is a god one it is warm I cannot do anything with the suit I got at Funston they won't let me trade it in any way they have not got any big enough for me, and I bought me a good Kiki pants for $4.50 it is a lot heavier than what they gave me I asked them to give me another one but they would not do it so I got me one so I can change and wash my other one. I am all dressed up today my leather putts sweater and a new pair of pants, I was going to buy a O.D. pair of pants insted of the Kiki the cheapest I could get was $12.50 the cheapest O.D. suit is $30.00.

 

Inclosed you will find a picture of a real soldier I think it is better than the last one. I weigh about 180 now I am feeling just fine now, well it is five thirty now I will go to supper. I close

 

From Brother

Edw.

 

Page 80.

 

Camp Doniphan

Dec. 10. 1917.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter that you wrote the eighth. We have had quite a lot of cold weather wind blows hard and snowing. Have never felt cold with the two blankets and heavy overcoat. I am going to take my pants to a tailor and see if I can get them made bigger.

 

Well I am going to speak to the Capt. tomorrow and ask for a pass. I do not think it will do any good but he cannot say anything but no.

 

I am feeling just fine now, I think I will take out insurance sometime tomorrow as I heard they had some more blanks in.

 

About the government sending you the money things are kind of balled up, it might not come till next month. You will get it sometime.

 

Well I have six more letters to answer so I will close with best wishes from

 

Edw.

 

Page 81.

 

Camp Doniphan 12/14/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter today noon and also got Geo. letter as I got a lot of work to do tonight, as in the morning is inspection, I have got to shave, shine my shoes and I would like to go to the Y.M. they are going to have big doings there tonight but I won't have time I have sure been busy I never get to bed any night till about 10 o'clock.

 

We are having some cold weather I am getting a little used to it now, but I never get cold in my bed only fooling around or drilling we have been wearing two pairs of pants, but it is not so bad today or tonight it is still we do not feel it so bad. Yes Baylen and Brooks went out to the trenches the day before we did and stayed all night, they are in Batt. B. they did not like it any better than me, but we all have to stand it. Yes I thought it would not not get cold down here but when it is 3 or five below it is cold and the wind blowing strong, I will never forget it. Kansas is a lot better but I do not think it will stay this way long. I hope it is nice Xmas I can just plan on having a good time here as there is no chance for any of us to come home unless things changes a lot in the next few days I think the only time I ever get to come back is when the war is over if it is two years they won't let us off, if the war is not over by March or

 

Page 82. 

 

spring we will be on our way to France that is sure if not sooner for me will train on the French guns they won't have any of them here, hope they wait till warm weather comes before they send us, but we do not know anything for sure not until we do it. Geo. could get in here with me if he wanted to but he would have to enlist, if he would of been with me the last week or ten days it would have sure toughened him up it sure is getting me that way I have not had near as many colds down here or in the Army as I used to have when I was home a person will naturally get used to it if he sticks to it, we will all stick if not, to the guardhouse we go, it does not make any difference what they tell us to do we have just got to do it, one of our men stayed in Lawton over night he is in the guardhouse for two or three weeks, it is filling up right along, it will run over after Xmas if they keep this up.

 

I will go on guard again about next Tue. night I am going to try and get on, at least it is about my time as I do not want to get on six days later I would have to be on Xmas day, and that won't do, the Sgt. will let me on all right, he is a good fellow.

 

If Geo comes down, he ought to be able and start there at Sat. night or Sunday and stay

 

Page 83.

 

at least two days the Co. can let him off for a few days, but you cannot figure on coming as it is to cold and hard for you to get around it would make you sick but it does not make any difference to me Geo know how it is, it would wear you all out.

 

I will get home someday again but when nobody knows, if Geo comes I think I will stay in Lawton with him Mon. night and go to early mass and communion Tue. morning that is if I can get the pass I think I can that will make it nice I will get me something to wear on my ears or get a cap I will see what they will allow me to wear.

 

Well write as soon as possible and let me know

 

Well I guess this is enough I answered both letters in one as I have not got time to write two letters. I close with best wishes from

 

Edw.

 

Page 84.

 

Camp Doniphan 12/15/17

 

Dear Mother

 

I got your letter this noon I have not got anything to do this afternoon I am off we had inspection this morning and we got through at about 1030 and then I washed just towels, socks, handkerchiefs and dish towels, I took the rest of the laundry last Wed, I will get it back this Tue. we got hot water now in the bath house so we always have hot water to do our washing, I will not go to town today but will in the morning and go to church. Yes we go out every day to drill at 730 in the morning we keep warm by running, our feet never get cold as we walk nearly all the time or we do not walk we run, my head never get cold you do not need to think I am going to freeze my ears or head I'm going to get something, when we stand our overcoat collars up they reach clear to the hat that breaks the wind they are going and give and give us all a new pair of gloves for as mine are worn out but I bought me a pair of canvas gloves they let us wear them, we wear our cotton pants and our overall over it so it's not cold when we are out, that sweater you knitted it is sure a good one it fits fine and I'm wearing it under my shirt and I wear the sweater I bought over it all and also my overcoat we wore our overcoats all day today, if you want to you can send me some woolen socks not knitted ones as that is to much for you to do just any kind of heavy socks, Geo can bring them when he comes down. I will close with best wishes

 

From Edw.

 

Page 85.

 

Camp Doniphan April 21/18.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter last night and knowing that I was going on guard tonight so I went over to Lawton as it was a fine eve. and took in a show so today Sunday I stayed in camp I went to church at the K. of C. Hall here in camp this morning I am writing this right after dinner and we got to be ready to go by four I got to have a blanket role with two blankets in it & my overcoat we got to guar the infantry camp we won't get off till tomorrow evening at five. I hope it won't rain between now and then. Oh, this is a great life, it looks as if the war is never going to end, we will shoot our firecrackers in France that is pretty sure that detail that left here some time ago they arrived safely in France as a good many in this battery received a card from them, I will send one of them by the 4th. We are drawing stuff and checking things up all the time as if we are going to leave soon but we cannot tell it sure looks as if we are going but I can't believe it I won't believe it till we leave here. Well how are you all? I am feeling fine as ever. Will close with love and best wishes to you all

 

From Edw.

 

Page 86.

 

Camp Doniphan 12/21/1917

 

Dear Brothe:

 

I will drop a few lines this evening I am real busy as they keep us busy out at camp. I do not get very much time, I received your letter this noon, I will do just what you said, I will get a room in Lawton Mon. night and also rent for Tue. I think I can get a pass easy for a couple of days, I will go to early church, I think it will be at eight and be out at 9 or little after. I will meet you at the Rock Island station you wait there, if I am not there and if anything happened between now and then I will send you a telegram. But I know we won't be quarantined now anymore, I guess they took Baylen to the hospital he has got the measles.

 

Well this is all I have time to write tonight if I should not be there by ten o'clock you come out to camp, I will be there that is if nothing turns up, you can look for me at the station.

 

I will close from

Edw.

 

Page 87.

 

Camp Doniphan 12/22/17

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write you a few lines this Sat. afternoon as we are all off today, it sure is a fright how the packages are coming in for Xmas they got in a dozen saxes morning and they are all taken to the mess hall and given out and opened and eat them and everybody gets some of it. I asked for a pass from Mon. night till Tue. night, he said he would write me one out Sunday morning. They are having quite a time holding the men in camp as so many are leaving without a pass at least they try it, 35 started out of one Co. from the infantry but they caught nearly all of them as they cannot get out of here, none now of them can catch a train from Lawton unless they have a pass, some hire cars to go to Okla. City a lot of them were caught there. Well I am going to stay right here, well I am going to go to the midnight mass, I do not know for sure if they are going to have it yet, I will find out at church in the morning. I wrote Geo. a letter last night. Well how is everybody I am fine, the weather is awful damp the last few days it misted all night last night.

 

And if use see any of Baylen's tell them that Francis is in base hospital with the measles, I would write to them but I do not know there box number.

 

Well I will close for this time.

I wish you all a Merry Xmas

 

Edw.

 

Page 88.

 

Camp Doniphan 1/6/17 [Should be 1918]

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter the other day Friday. How is everybody now I am fine as ever, I came over this morning to church and they announce that the initiation will be this next Sunday about fifty are going to join, we are to meet up here in the K. of C. Hall at 1 o'clock and then go over to the hall, and then we are to have a banquet after the initiation.

 

I am coming home for sure now as we all get five days furlough only five per cent can go at any time it will take some time before we will all get home some have already went, a good many put their names in already, I put my name in for the 18th of this month but I do not hardly believe I will get it at the 18th they want to know just about when I would want it they will give it to me as near that date as they can I will get it within the next thirty days anyway they are going to let them go on what kind of record they had in the Army if they have been called down much or been in the guard house those that have the best record will be first to come home. I think I had ought to be close to the top, the boys are sure all excited over it they sure glad they get to go and I am to but after I get back I won't feel that way, I sure do feel fine today best I ever did before. I close with love and best wishes

 

From Edw.

 

Page 89.

 

Camp Doniphan Jan 11, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines this afternoon and let you know that I am still alive a person was lucky that he did not freeze for I never did see a storm like we had we never had one in Wichita like it, O this Okla is sure someplace, I went on guard Wed. night and it was nice up till midnight the wind changed to the Northeast and started to sprinkle a little but soon stoped but when I went on again at 630 it started to rain snow & sleet and I was out in it till 830 and it kept getting colder all the time and my overcoat got wet so when I went out again at 1230 it was about 18° snowing and blowing about 60 miles an hour and also sleeting the sleets was as big as buckshot just ice balls but they gave us caps, gloves overshoes, but they did not have any overshoes big enough for me, but we had to give all of this stuff back as soon as we got off guard except gloves, I sure never did see a storm like that before I never was out in weather like it before.

 

Well we just put up a lot more tents about ten or twelve more so we got about 4 or five in a tent now it is just my luck is always I got in one of the tents that we just put up they have not got any floor in or sides on they just sent on the ground

 

Page 90.

 

there are only four in our tent as when I got off guard at 430 last night we had to stand out side about ten min.  just before we got off I froze one of my ears. I guess it was about ten below zero this morning so when I got back to my tent last night at 430 there was an inch of snow on my bed and that much on the ground on the inside and just a very little wood it blowed the snow and every place so I shook the blankets off and went to bed about eight my overcoat froze up as hard till I could not bent it, I could hardly get it off when I tried to take it off two buttons just popped off it was froze that hard but I kept warm in bed I covered clear up over my head so when I got up or tried to get up my shoes was at the stove and I could not get to them without stepping in about two inches of snow so I finally got to them but they were froze to the ground and they were wet from Thur. in the rain and they was froze as hard as rock and I could not get them on so I just crawled back in bed and missed revelee but my Sergeant reported be present so I finally dug my old pair out of my sack and put them on and got me some breakfast

 

Page 91.

 

at 730 it was cold, they started two big fires in the mess hall and before they got them started one man fell over froze the Lieut. carryed him back in the kitchen and laid him between the stoves he is all right now. And I seen Baylen today he is out of the hospital now in and is well.

 

How are you all I am well yet but this kind of weather sure is no joke it is awful I never will forget this in 100 years, and but now do not tell everybody about this as it will get all around and it might make some trouble but this is just the truth, but I do not want everybody to know it I could tell you a lot more but it is to much to write.

 

It is clear today I think it will be warmer in a day or two and the snow will melt so don't worry I will make it if the rest can, another man out of our Batt. died last night at the hospital that makes two in the last week I know them both.

 

Well this is in the evening and I got your box and  letter that certainly was a fine box I can use it all the soxs is what I need the worst I will wear all you sent me, I did not get Geo letter, but I expect it Sat. I must close as I am busy tonight getting ready for inspection, will write more the next time. I close with best wishes.

 

Edw.

 

Page 92.

 

Camp Doniphan Jan 14/18

 

Dear Brother:

 

I received your letter this noon and was glad to get it, I just seen the top cutter and I ask him if I would get my pass this Fri. the 18th he said no and I asked him how soon and he said maybe the 21st as a number are going that day I was the third one on for that day at about six are going I guess now if the Captain does not turn that down I will get it, I do not think he will for I have not a bad record, I told the cutter I wanted it on Fri. so I could be home on Sunday, but you cannot count on me. I might get turned down so do not look for me till I am there. Say believe me I sure had a time at Lawton yesterday joining the K. of C. it sure was some initiation. Baylen went over with me he had it on me but Fred never even came over, we started at two and got through at seven and then we had the eats, smoking and speaking singing we sure had a good time I never will forget that day.

 

Well how is everybody by now? I am feeling fine it is real nice tonight not very cold, you had ought to been here a few days ago in my tent, that night with an inch or 2 of snow on my bed. Well I know a lot more but I have not got the time to write it. I close

 

From Edw.

 

Page 93.

 

Camp Doniphan 1/27/1918

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter yesterday and seen that you had a lot of company. Well I guess you are having some cold weather up there again we sure having it down here again. I am at the K. of C. hall. I just had my dinner I looked at the thermometer and it is five above zero on the street, I am just coming over to Lawton, once a week now on Sundays I and some more of us walked over here this morning it took only 1 hour to walk four miles there was not hardly any jitney's running I got a written pass from eight this morning till eleven tonight.

 

The wind changed to the north Sat. noon and kept on getting colder but it was clear when I went to bed and about two o'clock it started to rain sleet and hail some pieces as big as the end of my little finger it sure did rattle on the tent roof and I just tightened the ropes on the tent before I went to bed as the wind was blowing hard so I had to get up and loosen them again as when the tent get wet it shrinks and it would rip the tent into as that has happened before. I do not feel the cold so much anymore I am used to it, we sure had fine warm weather all week we drilled without our coats on just in shirtsleeves. Well that over sea detail has not left yet

 

Page 94.

 

one officer said they would not leave for two months yet if not I will get a chance to come home sure.

 

Well we will all get out of this was the way we went in even if we have to go to France. I am not a bit afraid to go over we all have an equal chance that is if we take an interest here in our work.

 

I have not gained any since you was here I guess it is to cold we are sure getting some good eats now it is getting better every day, I can sure eat I do not know why I have such an appitite.

 

I nearly forgot, I received your box the other evening with the socks in they are sure some good socks, I have enough for a while now and that sure was some good candy. How is Hazel and Gus. I have not heard from them for a long time as I wrote to them last. Tell Gus I will take that box of cigar back with me when I come home as it is to late for him to send it to me.

 

Well I guess I will close as I want to write a few more letters. Well how is everybody by now I am fine only got a slight cold. Another man died out of our Battery Fri. at the hospital he had the measles and took a cold and got pneumonia they had a military funeral yesterday and sent him to Missouri. They took the quarantine off of Batt. E. again one man took the spinal meningitis and he died within three days. I will close with love and best wishes from,

 

Edw.

 

Page 95.

 

Camp Doniphan  Feb. 3,/18

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter last night and seen that you have been having cold weather up there it sure was cold here to but it is just fine and warm today just a grand day and I wanted to go to town but they put me on guard Sat evening but I will be off at 430 this evening but they said I could go right after I get off guard tonight so they gave me a pass all signed up yesterday they sure have been treating me real good and all of us the last few weeks as we have a good Col. now we did not go out to drill for two days when it was so cold but we had school in our mess hall, I received your papers also Sat. and was glad to get them. Well how is everybody I am just fine as can be. Well I do not know yet when I will come home yet not before the 15th anyway and one good thing is they started in the other day to give 7 day pass instead of 5, we will all get a chance to come home sometime soon, the over sea detail will not go yet for some time so they are going to let them go ahead of us now let them go 1st as they will leave first. It sure was nice on guard last night not a bit cold and moonlight, we got caps and overshoes now I got me a pair that fits me now regular hightop overshoe they sure are good ones. Well I must close and go to dinner, with best wishes,

 

From Edw.

 

Page 96.

 

Camp Doniphan Feb 5, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter you wrote last Sunday and I received both packages of papers I get to see an eagle once in a while, I seen this Sunday eagle and seen in it where they are going to give us Kansas farmer a furlough for the summer. I hope they will do that, that sure would be fine and by fall the war would be over.

 

Well how is everybody I am fine as can be, and it is nice and warm now, but the wind sure did blow today could not see a thing for the dirt, I just sure out, everything was covered we got to put up our tents every morning and hang out our blankets and when we got back in at about ten everything was covered with dirt we just shake them out and that is all, we did not go out to drill from ten this morning and the rest of the day we had school in the mess hall as it was too dusty to go out, the Col. knows his business it is getting still this morning, this sure is a dirty place.

 

Well I went over to the K. of C. meeting Sunday night we had a good time speaches musical program & some boxing Fred could not go for he went on guard Sunday night

 

Page 97.

 

and I just got off Sunday they are going to have another entertainment next Sunday evening over there.

 

Say we got a 100% Battery here for taking out insurance everyone in our Battery took out $10,000 worth of insurance we were the first Battery they are going to try and make the whole Regiment do that so it will be an 100% Reg.

 

I have not heard from Gus yet I guess he is too busy to write.

 

Yes I answer the letter that I got from cousin Manda Schwaegel the next day and I sent them one of my pictures, they did not answer me yet, I got a letter from cousin Mimmie Kabureck about ten days ago and I never answer it yet but I am going to tonight yet, O yes I got a letter from Ralph Boyd Monday.

 

Well I guess I will close and go in right Mimmie Kabureck a letter now, well best wishes

 

From Edw.

 

Page 98.

 

Camp Doniphan

 Feb. 20, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I got here in camp at two this afternoon, we laid over at Chickasha 20 min. I slept all night as soon as I hit the chair, well everything is the same yet but it sure makes a fellow feel blue to hit this camp again it sure is cold here tonight they did not go out to drill here this morning on account of the cold weather well I do not know a thing new here I guess I will do the same old work over tomorrow if it is not to cold, I will not write much and I am going to bed and get some good sleep tonight did you get home before morning, I was just about asleep when the train pulled out of Wichita. I got my box of candy but I did not get your papers.

 

Well I guess I will close I just thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know that we got here ok.

 

Well I will close with best wishes from

 

Edw.

 

Page 99.

 

Camp Doniphan

February 24, 1918

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I received your letter and box Sat. noon everything was ok. I took the ball glove over to Fred and Skean it sure was a grand night last night just as warm as in summertime I did not wear any coat last night up there, I came over to Lawton this morning and today is the hottest day we ever had down here so far. I have been out on the street and met Ralph Branch that used to come out at our place but he did not know me till I told him who I was and then he remembered me yet he is going to an officers training school it will take him till the end of April yet till he will get through, and I also met Arthur Whitecotton on the street it was the first time that I seen him since he left Wichita he still looks the same.

 

This weather makes a person feel tired and lazy. Well we had quite a inspection Sat. morning we had what we call pass in review inspection that is our hole regiment before the Kernal in a Battery front and C. Battery had the best line out of the six Batterys and guides had the flag

 

Page 100.

 

it was just like a parade, but the big one will be pooled off tomorrow we will pass before the General the hole 39 division will do that tomorrow and the next day and there is expecting to be some big changes made it will tell what we will do this summer wheather we stay here are go to the coast or France or trasferred to another camp they are expecting the changes within ten days if there will be any made, well I do not think we will go across yet.

 

Well I guess it will be about my turn to go on guard tomorrow evening if not then I will have to go on next Sunday evening on the tenth of March. I guess I could get me a week end pass to Oklahoma City if I want it, they asked for some volunteers to scrub up the kitchen tables Friday night and they asked me if I would help and I said yes and we worked 220 min. so we are entitled to a pass from Sat. noon till Monday morning at 930 but I do not think I will take it or go to Oklahoma City.

 

Well I do not know anything else so I will close for this time with best wishes from

 

Edw Sauzek.

 

Page 101.

 

Camp Doniphan in March 8, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I received everything; I got a letter from you last night and today noon, one was the registered one, and I also got Geo. letter, and tonight I got the photo and the other box, and I also got Geo. box with the knife it sure is a swell one. I got more things this birthday that I ever did before, but I rather would have nothing and be at home, I think it will be all of year yet before I will be home for good. I might be 25 before I get out, I sure thank you for all the things.

 

I shall get me a pocketbook one of those that I spoke to you about they have the cross canon on them and the Battery C. 130th. they are sure nice.

 

Tell Geo I will write to him in a day or two as I won't have time tonight. As we have a new way eating now we do not use our mess kits anymore we use dishes, but all granite plates cups and bowls about two hundred plates cups and about 1 million knife and forks and spoons, there are 16 men to a section and two out of them get to wait on the tables and wash the dishes for a day so my turn comes real often, I took my turn today so I won't have to go on Sunday there are sixteen men to do the work to clean up and wash them. Well I guess I can go to Lawton Sunday as they change the guard around a bit they started the Batterys on alphabet

 

Page 102.

 

order a, b, c, d, e, f, our Batt. went on last night so next time we will go on Wed. a day earlier every time we go on.

 

Say that picture is good I look just like a Mayor or a General only I have not got the ornaments on, it came in a fairly good shape, the car was didn't but it did not hurt the picture.

 

Well how is everybody now. I am real well, but have a little cold it will soon get well in this hot weather.

 

Well I do not know anything else and it is 920 now so I will quit and go to bed.

 

And I thank you for sending what you did. I close with love and best wishes to all

 

Edw. Sauzek.

 

Page 103.

 

Camp Doniphan March 10 1918.

 

Dear Brother Geo:

 

I received your letter the other evening I was surprised to get one so soon.

 

Well the Army is the same as ever only it is getting older all the time, I seen a piece in the K. C. Post last night where they are passing on letting the farmers go home to farm for 90 days I wish it was so I guess we will know in about ten days if there is anything to it or not.

 

Well I just come into Lawton they did not sign my pass till eleven o'clock so I stayed in camp for dinner and went to the K. of C. hall this morning for church in camp, it is just a grand day, the weather has been real warm all the time for the last 2 weeks it has been so hot that I lost three pounds in weight I just weight myself I weigh 180 lbs. Well there is not anything new going on today I will go to some shows after a while after I play a few games of pool, I am waiting for Baylen up here he said he would meet me up here. Baylen and I were over to see Fred Bachman and Byron Skean but Byron was on guard well I am lucky that I was not on some kind of duty today I am off till eleven tonight. Well Rankey is getting along as well as ever, I think Fred Bachman will be home now before long on his furlough Targert of Valley Center went home yesterday.

 

Well I do not know anything so I will stop I am feeling fine and tell Claud Newfer hello, if you hear any news let me know.

 

From Brother Edw.

 

Page 104.

 

Camp Doniphan March 18, 1918.

 

Dear Brother Geo.

 

I received two long letters in one tonight and see by one that you are some big businessman, well you could use some of it down here if you are in the Army it sure seems to take a lot of money, but I should worry now since I got the big raise of $3. I like my new work real well it is not quite so hard I did not do hardly anything today.

 

Well so you do not think that you can come down Easter I do not expect to be here any longer than April as that detail is sure to leave here by tomorrow as they have everything packed even got there cots turned in. Our Capt. is in the over sea detail and he was taken off as our Battery commander this morning but the detail is going ahead and then probably about 5 or 6 weeks we will be there, the detail will be with our Battery when we get over there so we are bount to leave here if they go across now. Our Capt. gave his last lecture to us this morning he sure is a fine Capt. I hate to see him go, he said that he will see us all over on the other side and we will all come back together, and he said when we get over there he wants to see a real Battery just

 

Page 105.

 

as good or better than it is now, we have not even got a Lieut. now our top Sgt. is in the Battery commander now, but we will have a Lieut. in a day or two, I cannot say nothing about when we leave I do not believe it till we are moving.

 

I have thought maybe I would get a 48 hr. pass Sat. morning till Mon. morning after Easter and go into Wichita as I would get in there early Sat. night and could stay all day Easter but I asked the top Sgt. he said he did not think I would have any luck unless things changes.

 

Yes I will be home Sat. & Sunday, I guess, or I know I can get a 36 hr. pass at least from Sat. 330 till Mon. morning, well you can do as you please about coming down, but if we ever leave here you won't get to see me till the war is over. So if you want to just calm down and come out anytime as we have inspection in the morning I might be busy in the morning but you can wait here for me I will be off for dinner and I don't think I will have anything to do in the afternoon as we did not do anything last Sat. afternoon. Well do as you please about coming down, I will look for you sometime Sat. morning. You might not get the chance to come down any more before I leave and it might be a year. Well I sure do not care I just as soon move now that is the way I feel about it. I will close for this time

 

From Brother Edw.

 

Page 106.

 

Camp Doniphan

March 31, 1918.

 

Dear Mother

 

It is grand whether now the rain warmed things up and things are green.

 

Went over to Lawton last night and to church this morning had a hard time to get there as today is the last day of the month and we have what is called muster out the last day of every month and the office has to see if we are there before we get our money.

 

I got a pass till eleven and tonight and I bought a large picture of the camp, our regiment is right in front.

 

I have got the spring fever and can't do much of anything. So I will close with love and best wishes.

 

Edw. Sauzek

 

Page 107.

 

Camp Doniphan April 8, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter today noon. Well I am feeling real good today. I drilled all day but I was a bit weak yet. Well I did not go to Lawton yesterday but I went to church here in the K.of C. hall there was a big crowd there at 930 there was about eight of us went over there from this battery it was a nice day, after dinner Bill Acker and I went over to see Fred Bachman and stayed there for supper and then came over here to the K. of C. all and watched the boxing match.

 

I bet it must look nice to see things green up again, but you are late the lilacs down here in Lawton were all in bloom Easter Sunday, a week from yesterday and the pasture is good, it is growing fast.

 

Well is the weather still cold up there it has been real cool down here for about a week now, it is cloudy tonight and Northeast wind it looks as if it will rain some more in a short while.

 

Well I do not know any news so I might as well quit for this time with best wishes from

 

Your son

Edws. Sauzek

 

Page 108.

 

Camp Doniphan

April 10. 1918.

 

Dear Mother.

 

I received your package this evening those chocolates and mints were grand.

 

I am feeling better now. We did not do any drilling today. Our firing squad went out to do some firing this morning and the rest of the battery went along. They borrowed three, three inch guns from the 129th F.A. they fired 25 rounds each and we stood about 40 ft. behind the guns they sure did smoke. The guns came back about 3 1/2 ft. or what is called recoil of 3 1/2 ft. We could hear the sheels roling through the air and could see the shells explode around the targets out by the mountains a distance of 2 1/2 miles it sure is fun to watch them.

 

Well looks like there would be a big wheat crop this year and maybe Uncle Sam will let me harvest it. I would like to have a change of work. We are just the USAG if they have any trouble on the border we will be sent down there.

 

Well I must close as I want to see the show at the YMCA a real vaudeville show tonight. With best wishes

 

Edw.

 

Page 109.

 

Camp Doniphan April 18, 1918.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter this evening and see in it that you are having a quiet a time at home with the stock, at home.

 

Well we had a great time today we got up at five o'clock this morning and left for the target range with our rifles we left here at 630 and got out there about 730 we stayed out there all day we had dinner out there we had to take our raincoats along, as it springlet a little off and on all day and the wind blew strong from the north two Battery went out together C. & B. 50 men fired at a time they had 50 targets, I fired 5 rounds the first time I hit the bull's-eye 3 out of five the other two were close only 1 point off the next time I fired 10 rounds I hit the I only 3 times and 6 one point off and 1, 2 points off so they gave me 43 points out of 50 points and the next ten I fired I hit the eye 9 times and the other 1 point off so I scored 49 points out of 50 points that sure was good a person is counted a sharpshooter when he scored 49 out of 50 so altogether I scored 114 points out of 125 points that is not bad for the first time I sure do like to shoot them, they kick about the same as a shotgun we were only 100 yards away and the bull eye

 

Page 110.

 

is six inches in diameter and the hole target is about 3 ft. square we have to lay flat on her stomach to shoot, now you think the bull's-eye is big, well it looks like 3 inches in diameter from back there, now if I had any ordinary rifle I would get the eye every shot but this rifle is altogether different if we are a hundred yards away we got to aim about three inches below the eye in order to to hit and if we are 200 yards away we got to aim about 12 or 15 inches below the eye it is on account of the kick of the gun so you can see it is a hard thing to hit we got to fire about two or three shots to find out where they hit first before you know where to aim how big or how low so it is a quiet a trick to hit 9 out of ten.

 

Well how are you all? I am feeling fine as ever. I must stop & go to bed.

 

From Edw.

 

Page 111.

 

Camp Doniphan April 25, 1918.

 

Dear Brother Geo:

 

I received your letter tonight and also that box of cigars they came just right, I never had a good smoke for a long time, I am smoking one of those are sure good. I think you very much for them.

 

Well I have sure been a busy soldier the last couple of weeks I went on guard Sunday eve. and got up Tue. morning at five by the new time and went out on the rifle range all day and this morning. I had to work in the kitchen & this afternoon we had a physical examination, and at four o'clock I had to go on guard again, I am writing this in the guardhouse now I won't get my sleep now till one in the morning as it is after nine now and I have to go out on post in an hour till tomorrow evening and we are due to go on the range Friday again & then Sat. will be a big inspection & checking up of all clothing that has been isued to us and maybe Sunday I will be off if nothing happens.

 

Well how is everybody by now I am feeling good even if I have not had much sleep the last few days, it sure turned cold here this evening the wind is blowing strong from the North West & the dust is a fright and is cloudy all over it looks as if it is going to snow.

 

Well I will stop for this time with best of luck to you all, from

 

Brother Edw.

 

Page 112.

 

Camp Doniphan April 29, 1918

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I will write a few lines this evening as I got a little time I have been so busy the last week. Well I got the two letters from you today noon but I did not get the box yet it goes a little slower I will get it tomorrow alright.

 

Well I sure had a surprise here Sunday morning when I seen Geo. I sure was busy Sat. packing up the things of the Battery and washing all of my clothing Sat evening and then go to town yet after 830 to send my suit case off.

 

Well I did not go to church Sunday morning as I could not get off on account of the inspection we had not ought to have had anything like that on Sundays but when we get ready to move we have to overlook Sundays. Well we are all packed up ready to go anytime but I do not think that we will leave for a week yet, at least.

 

Well Geo and I had a real good time Sunday I got to sleep in a real bed once more tell Geo. I got out here ten past six. Well I had a good job today I worked over at the quartermaster 20 out of this Battery was detailed to work over there we left here at seven and I was at work by 715 all we had to do was to carry the lumber up to them to saw they were sawing it to make boxes to pack things in it.

 

Well I guess I will stop as it is 930 now with love and best wishes to all

 

From Edw.

 

Page 113.

 

Camp Doniphan

May 5-1918.

 

Dear Mother.

 

It is a fine warm day it rained a little last night, just enough to lay the dust it is still partly cloudy.

 

Do not send anything more as we will pull out of here soon. Our Lieut. told us we would be out of here by Wednesday. I won't believe it till I am on the train. I guess when ever we do leave we will go direct to England. That will sure be some trip.

 

I was surprised when George came down. I would rather not see anyone just before I leave. It will make it a lot better as I would hate to see you go. We will all be back someday even if it is a long while. I can stand it all right as I am used to it by now.

 

Say you ought to have been out to camp to dinner today we had beefsteak, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn, strawberries & cream it sure was a feed.

 

I will close for this time with love and best wishes to you all.

 

Ed.

 

Page 114.

 

Camp Doniphan

May 8, 1918.

 

Dear Brother

 

I will drop but a few lines this evening as I received your letter a few days ago & I also got Mother's but I did not have a min. of time since last Sunday to even write we have been having inspection every day since, we had to today one this morning and one this afternoon, this will be my last letter from here as we are to leave here sometime tomorrow but where nobody knows or where we go through no one knows that is all that I can say and we do not tell anybody that even as it is no one's business untill we are gone a few days so tell Mother about so no one need to write anymore. I will write every chance I get I will give you an address sometime later.

 

We were all issued cigaretts and tobaca tonight this Reg. got $1500 worth of tobaca.

 

Well this is all I have time for, so everybody take good care of themselves & I will do the same, I feel fine and am glad as to leave this place. I close with best wishes to all from

 

Brother Ed.

 

Page 115.

 

9:30 Fri. morn.

May 10, 1918

 

Dear Brother:

 

Well we are on our way to someplace we left Ft. Sill at five Thur. eve and we have been riding ever since and we are not out of the state of Okla. yet I guess they must've stoped a lot last night. I do not know as I tried to sleep most of the time we are writing in chair cars but I think we will change to sleepers before we reach Kansas City or St. Louis anyway I hope so as it will be a long ride to New York City or New Jersey. I think that is where we are going we will sure see some sights before we get there we are sure having a time on the train there are 12 cars to our training two Batterys C. & B.

 

Baylen is with us to I did not know that he was back. How is everybody I am feeling fine as can be & having a good time we are riding on the Frisco track we went through Okla. City Tulsa Clormor Okla was the last station we went through. I am going to mail this at the next station but I do not know what place it will be I will try and get some cards later on and I will drop you one now and then. I will write Mother a letter later on. I thought if I wrote to you it would get to you this week yet. I guess by the time you will get this we will be near St. Louis we won't hit Wichita we will go through Ft. Scott we go over the same line that we come over coming down from Funston. Well I guess I will quit as it is hard to write on the train and a big crap game going on right across from me, with best wishes to all from

 

Brother Ed.

 

Page 116. 

 

May 14, 1918

Camp Mills

Long Island

New York

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening as we arrive here today here in camp at 4:30 safe as can be it is not much of a keen place as there are nothing but tents here with ground-floor it is wet and sloppy as it rained here last night, I guess we got in New Jersey Monday evening at nine and slept in the train till morning and then we unloaded and loaded up on a ship on the Hudson River on a small boat but it was not a bit small as it would hold about five thousand people it was a passenger ship double deck it sure was keen, some sights, I never did think there was anything in the world as I saw we was on the ship about two hours but rode only one hour from New Jersey to Long Island New York and when we got off, of the ship we got on the train again and rode 15 mi. to camp and got off of the train we had to walk 1 1/2 miles with our packs on our back to our quarters.

 

It sure is keen riding on the boat there sure were some sights on each side of the Hudson New Jersey on one side & New York on the other.

 

Well this is May 15th. I did not finish it last night as they were giving passes to New York City and they were all taken up till Sat. except last

 

Page 117.

 

night was the only chance so I thought I would take it as we won't be here more than one week or ten days. They started to give 24-hours passes to New York from one day noon till next day noon, I left last night at 7:00 or a little later and got into New York at 9:00 a distance of 29 miles by electric lines changed 3 times but it only cost $.35 one way and if you wait for a train it is only $.30 three of us went over together we got back at 11:30 today noon believe me it is some burg we walked about four or five hours last night in town and we never did get into a residence part not even a side street they were all main streets it is nothing to see buildings 25 stories high it sure is hard to tell which is North or South in New York City we go through Brooklyn New York to go to New York City but I never did stop off there I think I will if I can get off this next Sunday for it pays to go around here to take in the sights. Well I cannot begin to tell all what I saw on my way I do not know where to start in first so I might as well quit. I got your letter today up here that you wrote on the 7th of May it followed us right up and I also got one from Minnie.

 

Well I will tell you all the news when I get

 

Page 118.

 

back from France or we are sure bound to go now that is just what we are waiting for till we get on transportation I wish we would stay here for a few months we could have some time. Well Baylen got back in time to make the trip with us he is here in camp.

 

Well they are going to make us regular Army men now we used to be the USNG but they are taking the N.G off now.

 

Well how is everybody by now I am fine as can be it is nice and warm here tonight but it gets cool along with about midnight from the water of the Hudson we can hear the whistle of the steamships in New York City in the evening I say it is some place it sure is some big town.

 

I will close hope to hear from you soon or before I sail over the waters and give the rest my address if they have not got it already that is I mean Gus & Hazel. I will send them a card if I get time yet tonight.

 

I close with love & best wishes to all from

 

Address. Pvt Ed. Sa uzek

Battery C. 130 F.A.

Camp Mills

Long Island New York.

 

Page 119. 

 

May 16, 1918

 

Dear Brother

 

I will drop you a few lines as we leave tomorrow sometime but I do not know if we go across or not maybe to some other camps I do not know. If you do not hear from me for a long time you will know that I am on my way and if we do not go soon I will write soon.

 

I am as fine as can be if we will go I know we will have a good time.

 

So everybody take good care of themselves till I return from France.

 

I wish all of you best of luck and love to all from your

 

Soldier brother Ed.

(Good Bye)

 

I know we will leave this camp in the morning.

 

Page 120.

 

May 29, 1918

C. Btry. 130th  F.A.

American Expeditionary Forces

Via New York

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this morning as we are taking life easy on the deep blue sea, we are somewhere on the sea yet this morning. Have been having a real good time on all of my trips on land and water. Well how is everybody by now? I am feeling fine as ever and expect to as long as I am gone. I expect you are having  real warm weather there by now it has been real cool here on the water we had to wear overcoats nearly all the time all thru the day and it has been raining off and on the last four or five days it is a great trip and the sea has been quite rough at times, there were only a small number that got seasick, so far I have not been sick a day yet I made it fine so far but that is about all that I can tell you about this trip.

 

Well you know that I am getting along alright so far, I will write again a few days later tell them all hello for me as it is too much for me to write to all

 

From your son

 

Address Pvt. Edward A. Sauzek

C. Btry, 130 Field Artillery

American Expeditionary Forces

Via New York.

 

Page 121.

 

June 3, 1918

Somewhere in England

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this afternoon to let you know that I am feeling fine as can be, and that I had a good time on my trip on land and water although the land trip was more interesting than the trip on the water as there was the same scenery all the way and I never did get seasick all the way across, I done better than I expected.

 

Well how is everybody at home by now? I guess you are having real warm weather there by now, it is real warm here in the daytime but real cool at night. We sure do have a lot of daylight here it does not get real dark untill eleven o'clock at night and it starts to get daylight at 330 in the morning so we have mostly daylight here.

 

Well as I am not at liberty to write anything about my trip, I might as well close. I can tell you all when I get back home. I seen Fred Bachman & the Skein boys last night they all look good, tell them all hello and that I am feeling fine. I close with love and best wishes to you all

 

From your son

Edward

 

Address Pvt Edward A. Sauzek.

Btry C. 130 F.A.

American E. F.

Via New York.

 

Page 122.

 

June 21, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother & all

 

I will write a few lines this afternoon as I have time to let you know that I am getting along as fine as can be and I hope that you are all the same. I have not received any mail yet since I left the states and I do not expect to till about the first of Aug. I have been writing you about twice every ten days. I do not know if you are receiving that many or not I hope so any way.

 

Well what kind of weather are you having there now, hot I suppose it has been raining here off and on for the last two days and the awful cool, this country sure is a great place but it sure does not come up with the good old USA, as it is impossible to learn this French language but there are a quite a few that can speak a good bit of English.

 

Well I guess I will close for this time as I want to write to Gus and Hazel a few lines yet I will try and write Geo. a letter in a few days if possible, tell everyone hello for me and that I am fine as ever.

 

I will close with love and best wishes to you all

 

From your son

Edw.

 

Page 123.

 

June 25, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Brother:

 

Well I guess it is about time for me to write I never feel much like writing as I cannot write any news. Well how are you all making it I am as fine as can be and am taking in the sights in France.

 

Well what are you doing these days having a good time I guess. I guess it is hot and dry there now it sure stays cool here we wear our coats all day long it never gets to warm unless we walk along ways and it takes three woolen blankets to cover up with at night to keep warm so you can see it is quite cool here and it is nearly daylight here all the time only a few hours that it is dark.

 

Well I have not seen Fred Bachman and Francis Baylen since I got here in France but I expect to run across them sometime later.

 

Well tell the rest hello and that I am getting along fine and that I will write Mother a letter in a few days.

 

I will close with love and best wishes to you all from

 

Your brother

Edward

 

Page 124.

 

June 26, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother & all

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening as I won't have any time to write for a few days as I am going out on a detail in the morning after some horses as I have been with a detachment for some time and like the work real well, we go out to small-town and get them we go out and 4th of July we sure get to see the country it sure is a sight to see.

 

Well our Reg. Is not motorized we are going to get horses now.

 

Well how are you all at home by now? I am as fine as can be and am having real good time talking French it can't be done but we get along with them fine.

 

Well what is brother Gus doing these days still in the dairy business, I would sure like to be home and help you all with the work as I guess you have a lot of work to do. Well I may be home by next year at this time I hope so but nobody can tell yet. I guess it is harvest time there now it is not harvest time here yet not until about 15 July from the

 

Page 125.

 

way that wheat looks there sure is some fine looking country around here but I will take the good old USA for me.

 

They sure have some fine Cathedrals here in this country, there are no other kind of churches here but Catholic churches but they sure are old but fine on the inside I went to one last Sunday that was built in 1300 and something but it sure is fine on the inside. I was there this evening they had services there it is all French you have a fine big pipe orgen, and I went into another one about three weeks ago in England and it was built in the year 960 and it was in fine shape yet.

 

Well it is about dark so I will quit for this time and I will try and write again in a few days.

 

I will close with love & best wishes to you all from

 

Your son

Edward A. Sauzek.

 

Page 126.

 

July 3, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well July 2nd was the 1st time I got mail since I left Camp Mills, and I was shure glad to get them as it was a long time and can since I heard from anywhere I got two letters from you one that you wrote June 5 and 9th and also got one from brother George up at Camp Funston it sure surprised me to hear that he was in the Army he has been in five weeks now and I just found it out last night when I got the mail, I guess he knows what the Army is like by now.I would sure like to see George and Ralph drill.

 

Well I do not think that I will ever meet them over here as we are all over France now, one place and then another we will or I will go to and other place in about a day or two about 5 July. I sure like the work that we are doing I guess we will have a little doings tomorrow the 4th it sure does not seem like the 4th tomorrow but I guess it is.

 

Well how is everybody at home now, I am as fine as ever getting along fine.

 

Well whether over here is about the same as over there but a lot cooler at nights than over there we are eight hours ahead of your time over there

 

Page 127.

 

when it is eight o'clock here in the morning it is midnight over there. The days are a lot longer over here than back there it does not get dark till after 10 o'clock here and daylight at 330 nearly.

 

Well I hope you are all getting along fine as I am. I guess you have got a lot of work to do. Well I expect to be back by next year this time and then I can help.

 

I like it real well here but I cannot get the French language but we see all kinds of people from all over the world, we can find some once in a while that can talk English outside of us. I wrote George a letter this morning, but he did not write much.

 

Well write and tell me all the news as you can write more to me than I can do you as I am not at liberty to tell much about this country but I can sure tell you a lot but I get back.

 

Well I will stop for this time, I will write again when I get time. I close with love and best wishes to you all from

 

Your son

Edward A. Sauzek

 

July 4th.

I am going out on a eight  day trip this morning so I won't be able to write for 8 or 9 days not till I get back. Wishing you all a glorious 4th.  Edward.

 

Page 128.

 

July 14, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this afternoon, I came back Thurs. off of my eight day trip, I did not come back quite so well, I have laid off the last couple of days, I got some medicine and am feeling a bit better, but weak yet, but I think I will be better in a few days, I have a bad cold and no appetite to eat.

 

Well how is everybody at home now? and how is everything coming.

 

I have not received any more letters from you since the 2nd. How is George coming. Well there is no news for me to write so I will stop, tell the rest hello for me and that I will be up and on my way in a few days again.

 

I close with love and best wishes to you all from

 

Your son

Edw.

 

Page 129.

 

July 18, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother & all:

 

I will write a few lines this evening, I wrote you a few lines a few days ago, but I was not feeling very good then but I am a lot better now but I have lost a good many lbs. In weight.

 

Well how are you all by now? I received three letters from you in the last few days one that you wrote June 14th 24th & 30th. the one you wrote the 30th I got today July 18th that sure come fast I got only 1 letter from George so far.

 

Well I guess he is getting used to the Army by now. I know a lot of them boys in that list that you sent me a good many from Wichita I guess they will be all going before long.

 

Well it looks like as if you ought to of got more than one letter from me by this time I wrote a good many when I was in England and also since I have been here. I also got one from Minnie today, she said they were going to thresh about the 8th or 9th of this month.

 

They are just starting to cut wheat over here it is a little later as it is so cool it has been raining here off and on the last few days.

 

Well I made another move yesterday and I seen Baylen for the first time we landed in

 

Page 130.

 

France I have not seen Brooks yet but I did not look around last night as I was too tired and I won't have time tonight as I got to write letters. I have not wrote any for a long while to anyone else.

 

Tell Gus and Hazel to write once in a while, I wrote them several letters since I have been here.

 

Yes I think I got all of your letters that you wrote I got either 5 or 6 so far, yes we get some papers to read over here once in a while it is printed in Paris only one paper that is that we can read English the rest our old French.

 

Well how did you celebrate the 4th. I traveled on the train most all day and landed in a little burg to get horses there was about one saloon and one café in it.

 

Yes I got a number like George to, mine is not quite so high it is 1466551 that is my number you can keep that if you have not got it, and it might come in handy that is a good way to find a person.

 

Well my letter is getting quite long so I guess I had better quit for this time I will write again in a few days I hope you are all getting along well in your work and that I will

 

Page 131.

 

be home to help you all with in another year and tell Marie that I will write as soon as I get time I am quite busy at present.

 

I close with love and best wishes to all

 

From your son

Edward A. Sauzek

 

Page 132.

 

July 22, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write you a few lines this evening, I wrote you one night before last. Well how are you all by now? I am real well at present.

 

I received a letter from you today but it was a bit older than some that I have received from you it was wrote 19th of June, I see that you are having a real hot weather over there it is cool be here nearly all the time at least at night. Well I see that George was at home and over Sunday well I guess he was lucky in getting off, I know that I couldn't have done that when I was there, I guess you all must of had a good time. Well maybe it won't be long till both of us will be back and then we will have some big dinner together, I would have sure like to of been there to but I am many miles away but yet I am getting along fine but there is no place like the good old USA.

 

I must to get back and eat some of them good cherries that you canned.

 

How is Mr. house getting along by now? There is a man or a soldier in our Battery that is a cousin to Mary Grace Bevis

 

Page 133.

 

I found it out the other day by accident he did not know that George Murphy died till I told him, it sure surprised me when I heard it.

 

Well how is little Gus getting along is he getting big I guess he will be running around by the time I get to even him.

 

Well it is bedtime so I will stop for this time with love & best wishes to you all from

 

Your son

Edw.

 

Page 134.

 

July 26, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening, I have not received the letter for a few days, I received one from Geo. a few days ago I answered it tonight he sent me a picture of himself he looks like a soldier, it ought to do him some good a change of work.

 

Well how are you all by now? I am feeling better tonight than I had for two or three days I think I will be all right in a few days.

 

Well what kind of weather are you having by now? It is sure cool here all the time nearly.

 

Well what is the news out around there by now how is Hazel & Gus and the little man getting along.

 

Well I do not know a bit of news, I will try and write more the next time as soon as I get a letter from you, this is the second letter that I wrote to you this week.

 

I close with love & best wishes to you all

 

From your son

Edw.

 

Page 135.

 

July 28, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write you a few lines this afternoon I am at the YMCA writing this it has been a nice day today I got to go to mass this morning for the first time in a few weeks but it was no church like home but any thing goes here in the Army it is good at that.

 

I am going to try and go to communion next Sunday as it will be my last chance for some time you know.

 

Well how is everybody at home by now? I am getting along a lot better it was the worst cold that I ever had in my life it is the climate out in all kinds of weather, I am just about over it now.

 

Have you been getting any of my letters lately this is the third one that I wrote you in the last seven days.

 

How is Geo. making it now? I have been expecting some letters from someone for some time, I am looking for some every day.

 

I wrote Maria letter this morning as I had a little time.

 

What is the matter that Hazel or Gus does not write they ought to find a little time more than I can as we keep busy over

 

Page 136.

 

here and are a bit tired at night, soldiers life over here is a lot different than in the states.

 

There are a lot of things to see over here things that a person will never forget or even thought of before.

 

Well I do not know any news so I will stop till the next time, tell some of those slow people to wake up and write once in a while.

 

I will close with love and best wishes and good luck to you all

 

From your son

Edward.

 

Page 137.

 

Aug. 1 1918.

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening to let you know that I am as well as ever at present, I am feeling just fine and hope that you are all the same. I received two letters from you yesterday July 31th. one that you wrote July 5th and the other July 12th it did not take quite one month to come over here.

 

Well Brother George sure is lucky to get off as often as he does to spend the 4th at home, well I traveled nearly all day on the train on the 4th and stayed in a little burg all night with one restaurant and about one or two saloons, there were five of us we had quite a little time, well I hope I will be back by the next fourth.

 

Well what kind of weather are you having now, wet or dry it is raining here tonight, when it starts to rain it rain off and on for three or four days, then maybe not rain for two or three days, but cloudy nearly all the time and it sure is cool here nearly all day only a few hours in the middle of the day, it is a lot different than in the states.

 

Yes I seen Fred Bachman and the Skean

 

Page 138.

 

boys when I was in England they were getting along fine but I won't see them over here anymore unless I run across them by accident but I do not think that I will.

 

Well I did not get Geo. letter that he said in it that he had is picture taken but I guess I will get it soon, he ought to make a good picture, as I heard that he makes a fine looking soldier in his uniform. I received the postcard picture of him, I will send you a postcard picture of myself in a few days. I have not got them yet, that is if they are good.

 

I see in your letter that you was over at Gus and Hazel's and had such good ice cream that is the thing of the past over here, there is none to be gotten here, I never had any since I left the states and it is hard to get any soft drinks here, about the only kind of drinks that can be gotton is such as wine, beer, and Brandy of all kinds and several more such drinks, no pop or anything like that, no soda fountain any place or in drugstores eather, you would

 

Page 139.

 

be surprised if you saw this country it is nothing like the states, this is about all I can say about it this time.

 

I can tell you a lot more when I get back as I hardly know what I am at liberty to write, it is a bit hard to write a long letter unless you ask some questions I will try and answer them all if I think I am allowed to.

 

Well I must stop for this time, will write again in a day or two

 

I close with love and best wishes to you all

 

Your son

Edw.

 

Page 140.

 

Aug 7, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Brother Geo:

 

I received your letter yesterday that you wrote when you was home July 4th it took a long while to get here but it was new yet, it sure makes a person feel good to get mail way over here in the neck of the country. I also got one from Mother I have not wrote any letters for some time as it was impossible for me to, if you was in my place you would say the same thing. I see you spoke about Francis Curtis being over here in the 353 well they was close to us once as some boys spoke about the 353 but I did not pay any attention to it, I do not know where they are now.

 

Yes any life is alright if you do not weaken. I have went through a little more than you have so far as this life over here is getting more exciting and for us in a very short time. I accidentally run across to a boy from back home Lloyd Roll of M.P. is sure surprised me he seen Fred Bachman and the  Skean boys not long ago, these Skean boys have been at the front for about one

 

Page 141.

 

month they have been released once and are up for the second time, Fred just went up this Tue. he has been sick and Less Baker has been up to already he is with the 140 infantry they came back of the lines for there rest not far about where I met Roll last night.

 

Well I guess this will be enough for this time with best wishes

 

From your brother

Edward A Sauzek

 

Page 142.

 

Aug 8, 1918.

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will drop you a few lines this evening and let you know that I am well as can be and, I hope that you are all the same I have been waiting to get a letter before I write as I have not had from no one since the 31 of July I am expecting some every day.

 

Well how is brother George making it, and ask him if John Edwards is still up there at Camp Funston and if he knows if Irwin Bingham is over here. I ought to write him a letter but I have been waiting to hear from him as I wrote last.

 

How is brother Gus and family making it by now, I have not heard from them eather yet. Well I guess it is still hot and dry over there, it sure is not hot here, if a person knows he is going to be out of doors for about 4 hours and the sun is shining bright it will rain before he get back as I know for I have tried that it rains practically every day here.

 

Well I will close for this time with a little souviner from France that I got this evening.

 

I close with my love and best wishes to you all

 

From your loving son

Edward.

 

Page 143.

 

Aug. 17, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I have received two letters from you now, one a few days ago, and one yesterday, one you wrote on the 14th and the other on the 19th. Well how are you all by now?

 

I am as fine as ever before and hope that you are the same, I also received a letter from Brother Geo. the one he wrote when he was home on the 4th.

 

Well I see by your letter that you will are all doing some good works at home or I mean in our parish well it sure is a good thing, for we all need it over here, and I also see that you had a quite a doing in town one night in July you were all more excited over there then we were here.

 

Well I accidentally run across one of the boys back home last night, you may not know him but Gus does Loyd Roll he is still with the M. P. He seen Fred Bachman and the Skean boys not long ago, they have been on the front, the Skean been there for a month or more now they have had one rest already and are back for the second time that is in action and Fred just went

 

Page 144.

 

with them this Tue. they go back of the firing lines when they are released not very far about where Loyd is where I seen him last night.

 

Well I know a lot to write up but I am not at liberty to write it, so I guess I will quit as I want to write Geo. a letter yet, I wrote you a letter about six days ago and that was the only one that I wrote for about two weeks as it was impossible for me to write.

 

I will drop you a few lines in a day or two if it is possible.

 

I have not received any of your papers yet.

 

I will close with love and best wishes to you all.

 

Your son

Edward A. Sauzek.

 

Page 145.

 

Aug 21, 1918

Somewhere in----------.

 

Dear  Brother Geo.

 

I will drop you a few lines today as I have a little time.

 

Well how are you making it by now? I am getting along fine you want to be here with me if you want to see some real excitement business is picking up right along, it is a lot different than it was in the states.

 

We have been doing a good deal of moving the last few days, we are sure getting to see this country over here.

 

We are in the lands of where our old neighbors used to visit, I guess you remember that yet, do you not? I have not run across to anymore boys lately that I know but I guess I will see Less Baker in a few days when he comes back he is front of us, naturally he seems to like it alright.

 

I wish I could tell you all I know about this but I cannot do it as it would not pass, I guess I will have to wait till I come back home.

 

I received a letter from Mother yesterday evening and also about half doz. papers it sure did seem good to read the home

 

Page 146.

 

papers once again, it sure makes a person feel like being home and wanted to find out that he is many thousand miles away from there.

 

Well I should worry there is a big bright day a coming someday if everything keeps going as it is.

 

Well I guess I will quit for this time as I got about a half doz. Letters to write as I have not wrote any for a long time.

 

With best of luck to you

 

From your brother

Edward A. Sauzek.

 

Page 147.

 

Aug. 21, 1918.

Somewhere over here

 

Dear Mother:

 

I received your letter last night that you wrote on 22th July and also three packages of papers, I was shure glad to get them papers as I have been looking for them for a long time it sure seems good to read a good home paper so many miles away, those were the first that I had received I got one Advance it was in one of the biggest packages there was a good deal of news in all of those papers.

 

Well how are you all by now I'm feeling fine at present a lot of excitement here by the time you get this letter we will be in full swing right on our business it is picking up right along but do not worry about us we will do our part we will get along fine, I like it better every day a person get used to this life after he is in as long as I have been it is not worrying me one bit.

 

Yes I guess everybody is anxious to know what this country is like an or what just we are doing but I know why I do not write it as we are not at liberty to write what we want to, I will tell you all when I get back.

 

Well I will close, tell Gus and Hazel that I am still waiting for a letter. With love and best wishes to you all.

 

From your son

Edward.

 

Page 148.

 

Aug. 25, 1918

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write you a few lines this afternoon to let you know that I am well as ever and hope that you are all the same.

 

Well what kind of weather are you having there now, the weather has been nice here the last week we had a little rain here last night.

 

Well I went to church here this morning I could understand part of it as they spoke the same language they do in church that Marie goes over East.

 

Nearly every town over here of about twenty thousand has about four Catholic churches we sure have not got far to go to church. Well how is everything coming over there at home by now, I wish I was there today I guess is everything looks different there now than it used to. Are they having any doing going on around there any more, I seen in the paper were they had their annal picnic but in Riverside. I guess they also had there's up at Halstead Kans about a week ago last Thurs.

 

Are they getting ready yet for the fall fair I missed the one they had last year and I will miss this one and maybe one or two more.

 

Well what is Father doing now I guess he has about quit the dairy business by now hasn't he? Well that will give me a good chance to start in when I get

 

Page 149.

 

back won't it? He ought to see them farm over here cut the wheat and hay with a sythe rake it up by hand with a wooden rake loaded on a two wheel wagon hooked up to two milk cows believe me it is some out fit, we hardly ever see a four wheeled wagon, some parts of France they use horses they never hitch two horses side each other to a wagon they are hooked in single file one in front of the other, I have seen four in a line the French claim that they can't get more power that way and it is the same in England.

 

Well I guess I will stop for this time everything seems to be quiet here the last couple of days. I am not on the guns squads I am in the ammunition supply section of the Battery at present.

 

Well I will try and write again in a day or two so I will close with love and best wishes to all from

 

Your son

Edward.

 

Page 150.

 

Aug. 29, 1918.

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will write a few lines today to let you know that I am well as ever and and hope the same of you all. I have been expecting to hear from you most any day but I have not heard from anyone since I got your papers and that letter about eight days ago the mail does not get in here regular.

 

Well how is everybody coming around there now. I am sending some cards at the same time that I am sending this letter.

 

Geo. Gus. and you.

 

Well how is the weather there now, it is getting a great deal cooler here lately where we are.

 

Things are real quiet around here not much doing.

 

Well as I will want to mail this now so I will stop for this time with love and best wishes to you all from

 

Your son

Edward.

 

Page 151.

 

Sept. 1, 1918.

Somewhere over here

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I received a little mail last night but not much I expected a letter from you, but I did not get one I got two papers one Eagle and an Advance but they were older then the one I got about ten days ago and I have not received the letter for eight or ten days a week ago last Wednesday from you but these papers were new to me it took them nearly seven weeks to get here.

 

Well I have seen one of the boys from home today he is in the Infantry. Less Baker he ate dinner with us today his Co. is right close to us he is in A. Co. 140th but he will be scattered in a few days we are all going to move again in a day or two, so you may not hear from me so often but I will do my best to write, it just depends where we are or what we are doing.

 

Well how are you all? I am fine as ever and hope the same of you all, the weather is quite cool here the last few nights, we could see a little white frost on the morning of the 31th of August or yesterday morning it sure was cold, I guess it is not that cold there.

 

Page 152.

 

Well I got up early to go to church this morning another soldier and I we went at 530 we went to Communion.

 

Well I have not seen anything of Francis Baylen or Fred Bachman or the Skeans boys for a long while but I heard that they was making it alright.

 

Well how is George coming by now? I sure wished I could be there a while as it gets quite old over here, they had a movie over at the French Y. last night they have one every once in a while they also had a boxing match.

 

Well I guess I had better stop for this time with love and best wishes to all

 

Your son

Edw.

 

Page 153.

 

Sept 13, 1918

Somewhere in France.

 

Dear Mother:

 

I will try and write you a few lines this afternoon but I do not know if you can make this out or not, I am writing this on my gas mask on my knees, I have not wrote any since the first of this month, I have been to busy or in other words in a place where I could not mail a letter, I do not know if this will go or not but I will try, so do not be surprised if you hear from me only once in about two or three weeks, I will do better if I can but I expect to be real busy in a few days.

 

But do not worry we will make it alright we are prepared to give them the worst, I am going to be on a gun squad from now on, there is a lot more doing there.

 

Well how are you all by now I am getting along just as fine as ever. I received two letters from you last Sunday and also one from Brother George I see in his letter that he was home again he has sure got it nice he has me beat.

 

Well I am here to see the end and I do not think or hope at least that it will be many months any more.

 

Page 154.

 

One of your letter dated July 26 and Aug. 4th. Well I see that you have been having some hot weather there well it never gets that hot here. But the rainy season has started over here now, it rains off and on and night the sun is out one minute then raining the next, it is nearly to cool to have any time now to go in shirt sleeves. I was out all night the other night and I got pretty well soaked it was quite cool too, when the wind blew I was riding a horse, well I can not tell you all what I would like to, I will have to wait till I get back.

 

Well I have not received any more of your papers yet for some two or three weeks, but I think I will get them yet.

 

Well I guess this is about all I know to write now, I also received two letters from Minnie but I have not got time to answer them now, when you write to them, and tell them that I am alright and getting along fine.

 

Well I will close for this time with love and best wishes to you all

 

From your loving son

Edward.

 

Page 155.

 

Sept. 14, 1918

Somewhere in France

 

Dear Mother:

 

Well I will write another few lines today and answer your letter that I received late last night. You spoke about those churches yes there sure are fine inside, but they look a Feel it bit old outside but they are all rock the oldest one that I seen was in England as I wrote to you about that once before. I went to church last Sunday, it was not a big church but it sure was fine inside and good singing too, but I won't get to go tomorrow as there is none around here close that I know of as we are a good many miles from where we were last Sunday. Well I guess the weather is getting cool over there to, the sun is shining nice right now but it won't keep it up long.

 

Yes I would sure like to have some of those good American cigars but it is too much trouble to get a slip to to send to you for them, so do not try to send any. I get an American cigar once in a while from the canteen or Y.M. or Red Cross I run across some once in a while. I sure do miss them like I used to have when I was in the states, nothing like the good old USA for anything it can not be beat. Well how are you all now? I am just as fine as I can be. I will close for this time with love and best wishes to you all.

 

Your son

Edward A. Saizek.

 

Page 156.

 

[The front cover of a portrait booklet]

 

Page 157.

 

[Inscription of inside of booklet. "Edward A. Sauzek, Battery C. 35th Div. Wichita."]

 

Page 158.

 

[Portrait of Edward Sauzek in uniform.)

 

Page 159.

 

[Notation "Picure of Pvt. Edward A. Sauzek, Battery C. 130 F.A".]

 

Page 160.

 

[The back cover of the portrait booklet] 

 

 

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