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130th Gun Pits

130th Gun Pits
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: November 8, 1917
About three dozen soldiers of the 130th Field Artillery digging gun pits at Fort Sill. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


6th Class/Sections A &

6th Class/Sections A &
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 6, 1918
Dozens of soldiers training to use field glasses. Some are seated on the ground, some are in camp chairs, and some are standing. James C. Hughes was stationed at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918. He was a student and then from March 22 to May 1 he was an instructor at the School of Fire, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Asa Tongat is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Asa Tongat is identified on the image as being Kiowa, but another known example of the same image identifies him as Kiowa-Apache. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Ase-tite, Comanche, in Indian Territory

Ase-tite, Comanche, in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of Ase-tite, a Comanche, was made in Indian Territory in the late 1870s by William P. Bliss. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss, as do two other known examples of the same image.


Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Creator: Post Studio B
Date: March 1943
This is a photograph showing Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.


Battery Durette

Battery Durette
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 18, 1918
About a dozen soldiers examine two large log and dirt structures. They were probably used to hide field artillery from the enemy. James C. Hughes was stationed at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918. He was a student and then from March 22 to May 1 he was an instructor at the School of Fire, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Battery Durette

Battery Durette
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 1918
Close up of large log and dirt structure which also has sand bags on the sides and roof. It was probably used to hide field artillery from the enemies. James C. Hughes was stationed at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918. He was a student and then from March 22 to May 1 he was an instructor at the School of Fire, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Betty Hughes - Fort Sill

Betty Hughes - Fort Sill
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: April 21, 1918
Betty Hughes is shown in this photograph. She is the oldest daughter of James Clark and Mabel Hughes. She was born April 19, 1914, in Potwin (Topeka), Kansas. This photo was taken at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, April 21, 1918. This was just prior to Captain James C. Hughes' departure for Europe, May, 1918. Captain Hughes was a member of 130th Field Artillery and participating in the School of Fire at Fort Sill. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory

Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa chief Big Tree is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Block House Signal Mt

Block House Signal Mt
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Two soldiers peer over the wall of the ruins of a stone building. Seven soldiers are sitting and standing outside. They are conducting field artillery training at Fort Sill. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Building Officers Row, Ft. Sill

Building Officers Row, Ft. Sill
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: October 12, 1917
Soldiers working in groups to construct frame and tent buildings for the officers. One soldier is folding a mattress. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Bursting Course

Bursting Course
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 1918
A pile of large stones laying in an open field. James C. Hughes labeled the photograph "Bursting Course." Hughes was stationed at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918. He was a student and then from March 22 to May 1 he was an instructor at the School of Fire, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Camouflage gun emplacements, Battery Negre

Camouflage gun emplacements, Battery Negre
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 7, 1918
Photograph represents gun emplacements camouflaged with grass at Battery Negre during World War I, which may have been at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. The photograph was taken by Colonel James Hughes who was stationed as a student at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918 and then as an instructor. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Camouflage gun emplacements, Battery Negre

Camouflage gun emplacements, Battery Negre
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 7, 1918
Photograph showing the side of a grass-covered camouflaged gun emplacement at Battery Negre, which may have been at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. It is hollow underneath with a soldier standing in the entrance protected by sandbags. The photograph was taken by Colonel James Hughes who was stationed as a student at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918 and then as an instructor. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Camp Doniphan at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

Camp Doniphan at Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Date: Between 1917 and 1918
This is a panoramic view of Camp Doniphan at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, taken from the southwest corner. There are many tents, wood structures, horses and wagons in the photo. The camp was used to train soldiers during World War I.


Capt. McPennecamp

Capt. McPennecamp
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: October 31, 1917
Captain McPennecamp, without his hat and holding a cigarette, stands outside a frame and canvas building. A tent is to the left. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of Cat-in-pait, a Kiowa man, is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Chaplain Blackman

Chaplain Blackman
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: November 1917
Chaplain Blackman stands in front of a flag with a cross on it attached to a flag pole. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Charles H. French correspondence

Charles H. French correspondence
Creator: French, Charles H., 1893-1956
Date: 1917-1919
Letters written by Charles H. French to his parents, sisters, and maternal grandparents in rural Shawnee County, Kansas, near Silver Lake. The letters discuss French's experiences serving in the army during World War I. French was sent to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, for training. Eventually he passed through New York to the United Kingdom and ultimately France. Included in the letters are comments on Fort Sill training, waiting to be sent overseas, taking a locomotive to New York & a steamship across the Atlantic, his European arrival, the nature of Allied operations, the Armistice, working as a military truck driver, and French weather.


Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory

Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Comanche man and woman is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Comanche man in Indian Territory

Comanche man in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of a Comanche man was made in Indian Territory in the late 1870s by William P. Bliss. The cabinet card has a notation identifying the subject as a Comanche chief named Lone Wolf, but this is likely an error. Another example of the same photograph identifies the subject as being a Comanche named Wild Horse. William Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss, as does the other known example of the same image.


Company B, 110th Engineers, 35th Division at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma

Company B, 110th Engineers, 35th Division at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma
Date: April 17, 1918
This panoramic photograph showing Company B, 110th Engineers, 35th Division at Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.


Company B, 110th Engineers at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma

Company B, 110th Engineers at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma
Date: 1917-1918
This is a panoramic photo showing Company B, 110th Engineers at Camp Doniphan, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Camp Doniphan was used to train soldiers during World War I. This is probably the 35th Division, as there is another photo of this company in Kansas Memory.


Composite of Satanta and other Native American images

Composite of Satanta and other Native American images
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1867 and 1875
This carte-de-visite is a composite of ten Native American images believed to have been made in the late 1860s and early 1870s by William S. Soule. At least some of the images were likely made in Indian Territory; some may have been made in Kansas. The featured photo in the center is of Satanta, the Kiowa chief. Starting at the top, immediately above Satanta, the remaining images are (moving clockwise): Arapaho camp; two Arapaho girls; Kiowa or Kiowa-Apache man named Asa Tongat; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne woman; Cheyenne man; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne or Arapaho woman; and, two unidentified young women. Two of the photos are an exact match of a known Soule image (Satanta and Arapaho camp). Two others have the same subjects as known Soule images, but depict them in a different pose (two Arapaho girls and the Cheyenne or Arapaho woman). Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work. Three of the photographs in the composite are also included in the Wilson collection as individual cartes-de-visite--Asa Tongat (Item 227905), the Cheyenne man (Item 303271), and the Cheyenne woman (Item 303272).


Creek Near Battery Negre

Creek Near Battery Negre
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: March 1918
Seven soldiers crossing a shallow creek in the woods. James C. Hughes was stationed at Fort Sill from January 18 to May 18, 1918. He was a student and then from March 22 to May 1 he was an instructor at the School of Fire, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


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