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Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

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People - American Indians - Tribes - Cheyenne - Northern Cheyenne

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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Albert Henning to George W. Martin

Albert Henning to George W. Martin
Creator: Henning, Albert
Date: August 16, 1905
In this letter to George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Albert Henning describes finding "the body of an indian with a number of bullet holes in his body." According to Henning, the Indian that he found was killed by a party of men from Oberlin who had gathered together in the aftermath of a March 1879 attack by the Northern Cheyenne under Dull Knife.


Brass Bracelet from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Brass Bracelet from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This bracelet was fashioned out of a brass wire. The bracelet was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The site was home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala. It was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The Village on Pawnee Fork is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Coffee Mill Hopper from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Coffee Mill Hopper from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This coffee mill hopper fragment was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. Coffee mills are used to grind roasted coffee beans prior to brewing. This hopper fragment is made of cast iron and was part of a manual coffee grinder. The hopper fragment was cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Firearm Main Springs from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Firearm Main Springs from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These two firearm main springs were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The main spring on the left is from a Colt-style Model 1851 or Model 1860 revolver. The main spring on the right is from an undetermined firearm. Both were cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Grave markers for the last Indian raid in Kansas

Grave markers for the last Indian raid in Kansas
Creator: Piper, William C.
Date: Between 1930s and 1950s
These five black and white photographs show the grave markers for the victims that were killed, September 30, 1878, in the last Indian raid in Kansas. On that day a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians led by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas before continuing north into Nebraska.


Grave markers for the last Indian Raid in Kansas

Grave markers for the last Indian Raid in Kansas
Creator: Piper, William C.
Date: Between 1930s and 1950s
These five black and white photographs show the grave markers for the victims that were killed, September 30, 1878, in the last Indian raid in Kansas. On that day a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians lead by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas before continuing north into Nebraska.


Grave markers for the Last Indian Raid in Kansas

Grave markers for the Last Indian Raid in Kansas
Creator: Piper, William C.
Date: Between 1930 and 1950
These five black and white photographs show the grave markers for the victims that were killed, September 30, 1878, in the last Indian raid in Kansas. On that day a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians lead by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas before continuing north into Nebraska. The first image is the headstone of James G. Smith. The second photograph is John Young's grave. Thirdly, the grave of John & E.P. Humphrey. The fourth image is the burial site of an Indian girl. The site had been reported earlier as the final resting place for George F. Walters. His body had originally been in a pasture but was moved to Oberlin Cemetery in 1888. The last image is the headstones for William Laing Jr., and Freeman Laing. In the back row to the very right, is Moses F. Abernathy's headstone a victim of the raid.


Incidents of the Dull Knife raid

Incidents of the Dull Knife raid
Creator: Street, William D., b. 1851
Date: 1900
This item, written by William D. Street of Oberlin, Kansas, details the events surrounding the Dull Knife raid. According to Street, events began in the summer of 1878 while he was working as a cowboy in parts of Kansas and Colorado. Street recalls that he was first aware that something was wrong upon hearing women and children crying, something that he states was unusual because women and children "seldom frequented the cow camps." Street then asked a man named Sim Holstine what had happened, and Sim told him that an Indian raid had just occurred and the locals were preparing to assist the U.S. Army apprehend the offenders. The remaining seven pages of this item details the events that occurred after the party of men left to find the Northern Cheyennes responsible for the raid.


Kansas Historical Marker, Oberlin, Kansas

Kansas Historical Marker, Oberlin, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1959
These two black and white photographs show the Kansas Historical Marker commemorating the Last Indian Raid in Kansas. The sign was erected by the Kansas Historical Society and the State Highway Commission recognizing the events of September 30, 1878 when a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians lead by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas.


Monument for the victims of the Last Indian Raid in Kansas

Monument for the victims of the Last Indian Raid in Kansas
Date: Between 1940s and 1950s
These photographs show the monument for the victims of the Last Indian Raid in Kansas. Located inside the Oberlin Cemetery in Oberlin, Kansas, the monument was erected by the State of Kansas and Decatur County to honor the memory of the nineteen settlers that were killed by a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians on September 30, 1878.


Northern Cheyenne in Indian Territory

Northern Cheyenne in Indian Territory
Date: Unknown
This is a photograph of four Northern Cheyenne men posed in a mixture of traditional and Western style dress. The men in the photograph are, Black Wolf (far left), High Wolf (far right), Eagle Feather (center standing), and Porcupine (center seated). Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Northern Cheyenne village at Fort Laramie

Northern Cheyenne village at Fort Laramie
Creator: Carter, Charles W., 1832-1918
Date: 1871
This is a photograph of a larger Northern Cheyenne village located at Fort Laramie. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


William D. Street and George W. Martin correspondence

William D. Street and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Street, William D., b. 1851
Date: August 16, 1905-March 21, 1908
These two letters concern the raid led by Northern Cheyenne leader Dull Knife. According to Street, a number of "Indian men, women, and children" were killed fifteen miles to the south of Atwood, Kansas, in April 1875.


Showing 1 - 13

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