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Beadwork from the Lueck Collection Donation

Beadwork from the Lueck Collection Donation
Date: 1893-1897
These two beadwork pieces were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2002. The striking green and white beaded floral motif were sewn onto what is now scraps of red felt. The donor was the daughter-in-law of Henry Lueck, who was a partner in the Johnson and Lueck Store in Netawaka, Kansas, at the turn of the century. Some of the items in the collection may have been taken in trade by Mr. Lueck, but most were purchased from his Potawatomi customers.


Bone Awl from the Thompson Site, 14RC9

Bone Awl from the Thompson Site, 14RC9
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This awl was recovered during excavations at the 1986 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Thompson site in Rice County. Awls were used as a perforating tool in soft materials, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacture. The site, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village occupied during the Late Ceramic Period.


Bone Buttons from Cottonwood Ranch, 14SD327

Bone Buttons from Cottonwood Ranch, 14SD327
Date: 1878-1920
These three bone buttons were recovered during the 1990 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Cottonwood Ranch in Sheridan County. Shown are two 2-hole pants buttons and a recessed 4-hole sew through button. The ranch was established by Abraham Pratt from Yorkshire, England, in 1878 to raise sheep. Pratt's son, John Fenton Pratt and his family continued to raise sheep at the ranch until 1904. Cottonwood Ranch is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is a State Historic Site.


Bone Buttons from Fort Hays, 14EL301

Bone Buttons from Fort Hays, 14EL301
Date: 1867-1882
These five buttons were recovered in 1966 from excavations at historic Fort Hays in Ellis County by archeologists from the Kansas Historical Society. All six buttons are bone four hole sew through buttons, likely made with a lathe. Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and is a State Historic Site.


Bone Needle End from the Kermit Hayes No. 1 Site, 14RC3

Bone Needle End from the Kermit Hayes No. 1 Site, 14RC3
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This bone needle fragment was just one of many bone tools that were recovered during excavation in 1995 at the Kermit Hayes No. 1 site. Though this needle was made from a small animal rib, often needles were made from a bone splinter, then sharpened and polished. The artifacts were donated in 2007 to the Kansas Historical Society. The site, atop a ridge in Rice County, was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village. It is part of an Archaeological District in the National Registration of Historic Places and is a National Historic Landmark.


Button from a Kansa Site, 14SH302

Button from a Kansa Site, 14SH302
Date: 1820-1848 CE
This navy blue glass button was recovered from 14SH302. The button was a surface find during a 2014 survey by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and volunteers. 14SH302 is the possible location of American Chief's Village, the smallest of three Kansa Indian Villages in Shawnee County. It is a cone shaped button with a loop attachment.


Buttons from 14LV334

Buttons from 14LV334
Date: 1830-1900
These four buttons were collected from a multicomponent site overlooking the Missouri River in Leavenworth County. The site, with occupations in the Middle Ceramic and Historic periods, may have once been a Kickapoo habitation site in addition to later habitations. The buttons include a ladies dress button made of jet with a linear design and a loop or shank back; a metal four-hole sew through button, likely for pants; a white china four-hole dish button; and a wooden recessed four-hole sew through button.


Buttons from 14MY349

Buttons from 14MY349
Date: 1853-1920
These three buttons were collected from a multicomponent site in Montgomery County with both Historic and Early Ceramic period artifacts. They were donated in 1972 and 1973 to the Kansas Historical Society. The site has been much impacted by pot hunters and a reservoir. From left to right they are a black Novelty Rubber Company Goodyear button with a loop attachment that dates to 1853-1886; a plain wooden button painted black with a flat top and a loop attachment; and an iridescent button, possibly glass, depicting a mill and water wheel with a loop attachment.


Buttons from a Child's Treasure Trove, 14EW310

Buttons from a Child's Treasure Trove, 14EW310
Date: 1930-1959
Shown are five of the 83 artifacts stored in a jar that was recovered during the Kansas Archeology Training Program excavation in 1996 at Fort Harker in Kanopolis, Kansas. The artifacts were discovered in a broken mustard jar, shown in the two slides, and may well represent a child's treasure, buried and forgotten sometime between the 1930s and the 1950s. Shown are four of the six buttons that were found: a lozenge-shaped shank button, two white plastic buttons now stained red/pink and a black and gold glass button. Slight traces of the silver coating on the belt buckle remain.


Buttons from Fort Hays, 14EL301

Buttons from Fort Hays, 14EL301
Date: 1867-1889
These three buttons are just a few examples of the many buttons collected during excavation in 1966 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists at historic Fort Hays. On the far left is a gilt button front. In the center is a fast deteriorating composite button made of glass, brass and ferrous materials with a red enamel flower under the glass. On the right is a brass button with a fragment of enamel decoration still present. Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and is a State Historic Site.


Buttons from the 102 Steel Point Site, 14MO414

Buttons from the 102 Steel Point Site, 14MO414
Date: 1847-1874
These two buttons were recovered from a site in Morris County during a 2006 survey by a Kansas Historical Society archeologist and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The site had multiple occupations from the Archaic period to the late 1800s. The site may have been one of three Kansa sites along the Neosho River. One button is a white 4-hole dish china button, while the other is a cast metal button with a loop shank.


Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These five buttons were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The buttons include a handmade wooden five-hole button with offset holes, two shell 4-hole buttons, a china 4-hole button, and a china 2-hole button. The four white buttons were likely used on shirts, waistcoats, underwear, or for children's clothing. The larger wooden button could have been used for trousers, jackets, and some dresses.


Buttons from the Hog Pen Site, 14JO401

Buttons from the Hog Pen Site, 14JO401
Date: 1850-1900
These four buttons were collected from the Hog Pen site, in Johnson County, a multicomponent site with occupations in the Middle Ceramic period and again in the Historic period. Shown are four china buttons: a black four-hole sew through button, a white four-hole piecrust button, a white dome shaped button with a broken loop back, and a black self shank button with a gold and floral pattern.


Buttons from the Hollenberg Pony Express Station, 14WH316

Buttons from the Hollenberg Pony Express Station, 14WH316
Date: 1857-1941
These eight buttons were recovered from the 1991 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Hollenberg Pony Express Station in Washington County. Shown are a broken shell button, a 4-hole button with a purple cast, a clear glass button with an eight-pointed star pattern, a white china dish button with maroon trim, three white china dish buttons, and a black china 2-hole button with traces of gold around the sew-through holes. The site was the location of a pony express station, a stop on the Oregon-California trail, a post office, a blacksmith shop, and a farm with barns and other out buildings. The site was purchased by the Kansas Legislature in 1941 and is in the National Register of Historic Places.


Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1905
These five buttons were among the many that were recovered from an excavation at the Iowa Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941. Shown are three four-hole sew through buttons, one each of wood, china, and shell. Also shown is a brown china two-hole sew through button and a shell and brass loop or shank style button.


Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1905
These seven buttons were among the many that were recovered from an excavation at the Iowa Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941. Shown are a brass button front with a Greek Key pattern and two shell buttons, one with an inset center and the other a three-hole button in a floral shape. Additionally, there are four china buttons: two four-hole dish buttons (one with traces of purple coloring), a three-hole dish button and a two-hole Prosser button in two shades of brown.


Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1886
Shown are three of many buttons that were recovered from excavation at the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, in Doniphan County. The Mission was built as a boarding school for Iowa and Sac and Fox children and later changed its purpose to an Orphan Indian Institute. Shown are a four hole sew through wooden or bone button with a fifth hole partially drilled in the center. The small shell button is also a four hole sew through, and likely was used for a child's or infant's clothing. The final button shown is a four hole dish china button with a brown asterisk calico pattern.


Buttons from the Last Chance Store, 14MO367

Buttons from the Last Chance Store, 14MO367
Date: Unknown
These five buttons are among the many that were recovered from the excavations at the Last Chance Store in Council Grove during the 2016 Kansas Archeology Training Program. Descriptions for the buttons are from left to right: a handmade wooden five-hole button with offset holes, it may have been painted; a very small (ligne 14) shell button with a sunburst or floral cut pattern; a metal loop button with a floral pattern; a china red and white calico four hole button decorated in a triad design; and a china blue and white four hole button decorated in a zig-zag design. The Last Chance Store was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Buttons from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop14JO356

Buttons from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop14JO356
Date: 1858-1886
These four buttons were recovered at excavations in 1988 during a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. The buttons include a bone 2-hole trouser button, a white glass 4-hole dish button, a fragment of a black 2-hole button with a series of molded decorations around the edge and sew-through holes, and a black glass faceted button front. The site, 14JO356, consisted of the residence and out buildings built by James and Lucinda Mahaffie in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


Buttons from the Martin Farmstead, 14RP322

Buttons from the Martin Farmstead, 14RP322
Date: 1885-1947
These six buttons were recovered from the Martin farmstead in Republic County. The top row of buttons are all 2-hole sew through buttons made of plastic, metal, and rubber. The two buttons on the left of the bottom row are made of glass and are self-shank types. The metal button on the bottom right has a birdcage style shank. The site was the location of an archeological salvage project in 1992 due to impending highway construction, and is representative of the lifestyle of rural Kansans and Americans of the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries.


Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 1840-1950
These five buttons were collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Shown are a calico button with a brass rim, a black two-hole Fish Eye button, a large and a small shell two-hole button, and a blue plastic four-hole sew through button.


Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 1840-1950
These six buttons were collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Shown on the top row are a black plastic four hole coat button, a shell two hole coat button, and a faceted pink glass button with a loop back. Those on the bottom row include two shell two hole buttons, one of a fish-eye style and the other decorated with incised squares and cross hatching. The final artifact is a metal button front with the profile of a Greek or Roman lady.


Buttons from the Thomas Johnson/Henry Williams Dugout Site, 14GH102

Buttons from the Thomas Johnson/Henry Williams Dugout Site, 14GH102
Date: 1877-1910
Four of these buttons were recovered from the Thomas Johnson/Henry Williams Dugout site during the 2006 excavations by Washburn University. They were later donated to the Kansas Historical Society. The button on the right was recovered during excavations at the site by the Kansas Archaeology Training Program staff and participants. This domestic site was related to the settlement of Nicodemus, Kansas, an all black community in western Kansas. The buttons (from left to right) are: a large 4-hole shell button (perhaps for a coat), a glass 4-hole dish button, a small 4-hole shell button (child's size), a blue and white mottled glass 3-hole button (child's size), and a 2-hole shell button.


Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322

Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
These buttons were recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned. The three buttons are all 4-hole sew through buttons, one each of metal, wood, and rubber.


Cheyenne Moccasins

Cheyenne Moccasins
Date: Unknown
This pair of moccasins was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1920. It is believed that they were Cheyenne in origin. The moccasins were sewn with cotton thread and bound at the ankle with a tan cotton fabric and a red wool trade blanket material. The vamp is decorated with a floral pattern of blue, red and yellow beads.


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