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Avis Atkinson and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence

Avis Atkinson and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)
Date: February 12-16, 1943
This correspondence deals with the possibility of moving Japanese Americans to Kansas to serve as laborers during World War II. In the letter to Governor Schoeppel, Avis Atkinson of Fall River, Kansas, urges the Governor to do everything in his power to keep the U.S. government from allowing Japanese Americans to work in Kansas because "Once a Jap Always a Jap." Governor Schoeppel's reply is cordial but reinforces the fact that, if the federal government so desires, he will comply with their wishes and house Japanese Americans and/or Japanese prisoners of war.


Benjamin O. Weaver to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

Benjamin O. Weaver to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Date: September 01, 1943
In this letter to Governor Schoeppel, Kansas House of Representatives member Benjamin O. Weaver explains that many of his constituents in Kiowa County, Kansas, are opposed to the use of Japanese Americans as laborers in the state. Included with the letter is a petition signed by numerous Kiowa County residents which states that they are against releasing the Japanese Americans because they "think it dangerous to the war effort." A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Frank Black and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence

Frank Black and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence
Date: April 07, 1943-April 14, 1943
This correspondence addresses the possibility of bringing Japanese Americans to Kansas as laborers. In the first item, from The Topeka Building and Construction Trades Council, Frank Black, Secretary-Treasurer of the Council, argues that Japanese Americans laborers should not be brought to Kansas because of their "uncanny, treacherous, and barbarian instinct." Furthermore, Black contends that men such as himself will "never submit to any program which will elevate these barbarians to a point of superiority or even on a par with those who are doing our fighting." The second item, a letter from Mr. Black to Governor Schoeppel, explains that The Topeka Building and Construction Trades Council has sent its concerns to Mr. Leiker, and Kansas's Senators and Representatives in Washington. The final item, dated April 14, 1943, contains Governor Schoeppel's response to Mr. Black. In the letter, Governor Schoeppel explains that the idea to bring Japanese Americans to Kansas was developed by the U.S. Government, not by anyone in Kansas.


Governor Andrew Schoeppel and C. Fosberg Hughes coresspondence

Governor Andrew Schoeppel and C. Fosberg Hughes coresspondence
Date: June 07, 1944-June 16, 1944
This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and Minister C. Fosberg Hughes of the Plymouth Congregational Church in Lawrence, Kansas, concerns the possibility of using Japanese Americans as laborers in Kansas. In his correspondence with Governor Schoeppel, Hughes argues that many people have misinterpreted Schoeppel's position toward Japanese Americans in Kansas. In fact, Hughes contends that Schoeppel's statement "has been used unfairly by the American Legion crowd in town to whip up public sentiment against the resettlement of these families." In his reply to Hughes, Governor Schoeppel clarifies his position and states that, as Governor of Kansas, he must also take the objections of the people of the state into account because "those objections should be seriously taken into consideration and the evacuees kept out of those areas, first because of the safety of the Japanese themselves and second because it would only create turmoil and discord in the communities." After reading Schoeppel's lengthy reply, Hughes responds by stating that he is aware of the argument against sending Japanese Americans to Kansas. However, he argues that "too often the community mind is set by a very small vocal minority." Therefore, Hughes asks Governor Schoeppel to do what he can to make sure that Kansan's do not shift their "responsibility for American citizens from one community to another or one state to another."


L.M. Rymph to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

L.M. Rymph to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Date: March 29, 2009
In this letter to Governor Andrew Schoeppel, L.M. Rymph, State Superintendent of Congregational Christian Churches, explains that he believes using Japanese Americans as laborers in Kansas "will mean much in maintaining the morale of these people and in keeping them loyal to this their native country." Although he admits to Schoeppel that "this move may not meet with popular community response," Rymph contends that treating the Japanese Americans with respect is extremely important because America "must not just have another racial peon class."


Mary Golden to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

Mary Golden to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Date: March 31 - April 4, 1943
This correspondence addresses the possibility of moving Japanese Americans to Kansas to serve as laborers. In her letter to Shoeppel, Mrs. Mary Golden of Matfield Green, Kansas, argues that Japanese Americans should not be allowed to work in Kansas because of the way the Japanese military has treated American prisoners of war. In his reply to Mrs. Golden's letter, Governor Schoeppel explains that he is only doing what the federal government asks with regard to the Japanese Americans, and, if required, he will work with the U.S. Government "in utilizing American born Japanese labor on projects or in areas approved by your government, and my government officials." A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


McClure coresspondence

McClure coresspondence
Date: February 19, 1943-November 27, 1943
This correspondence between Russell McClure, City Manager of Wichita, and several important individuals in Kansas, including Governor Schoeppel, addresses the problems accompanying the attendance of two Japanese American students at Friends University in Wichita. The primary theme that runs through McClure's letters is that the two Japanese American students will not be treated kindly by the citizens of Wichita due to the strong current of animosity that existed toward Japanese and Japanese Americans.


R.E. Carver to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

R.E. Carver to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Date: January 10, 1943
In this letter to Governor Schoeppel, R.E. Carver of the United Brotherhood of Carpenter's and Joiners of America Local #201 of Wichita, informs Schoeppel that his union opposes the possible importation of Japanese Americans to Kansas in order to ease the labor shortage in the state.


Russell McClure to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

Russell McClure to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Date: January 11, 1943
In this letter to Governor Schoeppel, Russell E. McClure, City Manager of Wichita, Kansas, explains to Schoeppel that the leadership of the city is against bringing Japanese Americans to Wichita to ease the labor shortage facing the city. In his justification, McClure also cites views of the city's Chief of Police who told him that "it would present many serious problems for the Police Department since he has already had some experience in attempting to protect a few who have tried to located here." As a result, McClure argues that "the temper of the local citizens is such that it would be difficult to handle the situation."


W.H. von der Heiden and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence

W.H. von der Heiden and Governor Andrew Schoeppel coresspondence
Date: March 29, 1943-April 01, 1943
This coresspondence, between Governor Schoeppel and W.H. von der Heiden of Newton, Kansas, addresses the problems related to the possibility of using Japanese Americans as laborers in Kansas. In his letter to Governor Schoeppel, von der Heiden argues that Japanese Americans would only cause problems in Kansas because "they are of a different race, religion, and political beliefs." Furthermore, von der Heiden contends that "many have relatives fighting us and will resent us in this war and, when matters grow worse for Japan, you may expect anything from them."


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