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A Man's Reasons Against Woman Suffrage

A Man's Reasons Against Woman Suffrage
Date: March 9, 1910
Frank Foxcroft of Boston, Massachusetts, presented these remarks against woman's suffrage before the Judiciary Committee of the New York Legislature. He argues that most women do not want the ballot and that women already have too many burdens. He continues by discussing various other arguments opposed to woman's suffrage. He mentions Kansas on page 4 of the pamphlet. His remarks were printed by the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women.


Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston

Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: James, Ada L.
Date: November 6, 1912
Ada James, President of the Political Equality League of Wisconsin, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, President of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in Topeka, Shawnee County. James congratulated Johnston on the successful passage of a universal suffrage amendment to the state constitution.


Address to the Voters of Kansas

Address to the Voters of Kansas
Creator: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 25, 1867
The numerous authors of this pamphlet (Republicans) support the constitutional amendments to approve voting rights for blacks, for women, and to restrict voting rights to "loyal persons." They offer arguments for their position as well as criticizing the Democratic Party in Kansas for their opposition to these amendments. Forty five men signed the document, which was the result of a meeting in Lawrence. The following signed the document S. C. Pomeroy, Atchison; E. G. Ross, Lawrence; S. J. Crawford, Topeka; N. Green, Manhattan; Chas. Robinson, Lawrence; Geo T. Anthony, Leavenworth; Lewis Bodwell, Topeka; R. B. Taylor, editor Wyandotte Gazette; J. P. Root, Whandotte; James Rogers, Burlingame; S. Weaver, Editor Lecompton New Era; L. R. Elliott, Editor Atchison Daily Free Press; W. A. Starrett, Lawrence; Wm. Larimer, Jr., Leavenworth; John Ritchie, Topeka; John Ekin, Topeka; Sol. Miller, Editor White Cloud Chief; A. H. Foote, Lawrence; C. B. Lines, Wabaunsee; R. G. Elliott, Jefferson county; G. A. Crawford, Bourbon county; John Speer, Kansas Tribune; A. Low, Doniphan; R. W. Jenkins, Pottawatomie county; Ed. Russell, Leavenworth; J. H. Pillsbury, Editor Manhattan Independent; S. D. Houston, Manhattan; W. K. Marshall, Atchison; F. G. Adams, Kennekuk; P. L. Hubbard, Atchison; A. Hunting, Manhattan; J. B. Abbott, De Soto; Joseph Denison, Manhattan; T. H. Baker, Manhattan, H. W. Farnsworth, Topeka; I. H. Smith, Topeka; D. R. Anthony, Leavenworth; G. W. Higginbotham, Manhattan; John Pipher, Manhattan, R. L. Harford, Manhattan; Jas. Humphrey, Manhattan; Wm McKay, Manhattan; R. P. Duvall, Manhattan; Pardee Butler, Pardee; and L. F. Green, Baldwin City. Only the language restricting voting to "loyal" persons was passed in the election on November 5, 1867. Blacks and women were not given voting rights as a result of the 1867 election.


American Woman and Her Political Peers

American Woman and Her Political Peers
Creator: Ford, W. A.
Date: between 1892 and 1893
This 58" x 48" pastel is titled American Woman and her Political Peers. Pictured at the center is Frances E. Willard, American educator and reformer. Portrayed around Miss Willard (clockwise from upper left) are a mentally disabled man, a convict, a madman, and a disenfranchised Native American. Henrietta Briggs-Wall of Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas, designed the picture and commissioned Mr. W. A. Ford, also of Hutchinson, to execute it. Mrs. Briggs-Wall was active with the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association and with national and state chapters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.


American woman and her political peers

American woman and her political peers
Creator: Briggs-Wall, Henrietta
Date: 1893
This cabinet card shows a painting titled American Woman and Her Political Peers by Henrietta Briggs-Wall. On the reverse, is a description of the painting's representation.


An act conferring upon women the right to vote

An act conferring upon women the right to vote
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1893
In 1893, state senator Michael Senn sponsored Senate Bill 94, An Act conferring upon Women the Right to Vote, before the Kansas Legislature. The Judiciary Committee, chaired by A. W. Dennison, recommended to the Senate that the bill not be passed. Kansas women gained the right to vote in municipal elections in 1887, but it was not until 1912 that the state approved full female suffrage.


An act making appropriation to pay for per diem and milage...

An act making appropriation to pay for per diem and milage...
Creator: Kansas Senate Ways and Means Committee
Date: 1919
The Senate Ways and Means Committee, Kansas Legislature, drafts legislation for payment of individual reimbursement for listed Senate members during the Kansas special special legislative session 1919. The governor had called a special session to ratify an amendment to the United States constitution giving women the right to vote.


An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas

An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas
Creator: House of Representatives
Date: January 1913
This act was created by the Kansas House of Representatives in an attempt to do away with any poll taxing which required Kansas voters to pay a small fee before being able to cast their ballot. Poll taxing affected people of all races in Kansas. This act was not passed. Poll taxing continued in Kansas until the early 1960s when a federal amendment was passed which made poll taxing unconstitutional in all states.


Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston

Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: Shaw, Anna Howard, 1847-1919
Date: November 6, 1912
Anna Shaw, president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, announcing that women in Kansas had gained the vote.


Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph

Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph
Date: Between 1858 and 1868
This photograph is of Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, who moved from Ohio to Emporia in 1858. Shortly after her arrival, she married Joseph Vance Randolph with whom she had seven children. Anna was a passionate advocate of the abolition of slavery, and in the years following the Civil War, she also supported prohibition and women's suffrage.


Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs
Creator: Snyder
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women's suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer's Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women's voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.


Annual Convention of the Kansas League of Women Voters

Annual Convention of the Kansas League of Women Voters
Creator: League of Women Voters of Kansas
Date: March 1, 1923-March 2, 1923
One page program lists the speakers for the Fourth Annual Convention of the Kansas League of Women Voters. The convention was held at the Hotel Lassen in Wichita, Kansas, March 1-2, 1923. The heading includes the names of the directors, officers and committee chairs.


Championship of Woman

Championship of Woman
Creator: Train, George Francis, 1829-1904
Date: 1867
This pamphlet contains excerpts from and/or newspaper accounts of thirty speeches that George Francis Train, a supporter of women's rights, gave in Kansas over a two week period in October and November of 1867. Train came to Kansas after participating in an excursion to the Rocky Mountains with approximately 200 newspapermen to hunt buffalo. Numerous Kansas women's suffrage supporters are mentioned in the booklet. Train gave speeches in Leavenworth, Lawrence, Olathe, Paola, Ottawa, Mound City, Fort Scott, LeRoy, Humboldt, Burlington, Emporia, Junction City, Topeka, Atchison, Wyandotte, and possibly other communities. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were also campaigning in Kansas and shared the podium and/or communicated with Train. Train was an author, speaker, and a celebrity for his eccentricity.


Charles Langston to Samuel Wood

Charles Langston to Samuel Wood
Creator: Langston, Charles
Date: June 20, 1867
This letter was written to Samuel Wood from Charles Langston, the leader of the black male suffrage movement in Kansas. Langston addressed two issues; removing the word white from the Kansas Constitution and women's suffrage. The word white prohibited black males from voting in Kansas leaving them powerless. Although Langston did support women's suffrage, he felt their movement was hampering the progress of black male suffrage. Therefore, he was not going to speak on the issue of women's suffrage. Like many Kansans during this time, Langston thought women should wait their turn for their right to vote. Samuel Wood was an influential politician and a supporter of women's suffrage but not black male suffrage. Black men were unable to vote in Kansas until the passing of the fifteenth amendment in 1870.


Charles Langston to Samuel Wood

Charles Langston to Samuel Wood
Creator: Langston, Charles
Date: April 7, 1867
Charles Langston, Leavenworth, Kansas, wrote this letter to Samuel Wood, Cottonwood Falls, Kansas, in response to a letter Wood had written him on April 4, 1867, concerning a suffrage convention in Topeka. Langston was unable to attend and felt misrepresented. Wood claimed Langston thought supporters of female suffrage opposed Negro suffrage, which was not the case. Langston went on to explain that he needed Wood's financial help to secure black male voting rights. Enclosed at the end of the letter is a petition from the State Executive Committee of Colored Men. This proposition asked for two things; a vote in the fall election to remove the word white from the state constitution and funds to further the black male suffrage cause. The vote to remove the word white did not pass in the fall of 1867. Black men had to wait three more years before they received their right to vote in Kansas elections. Charles Langston later served as the principal of the Normal School--Colored in Quindaro, Kansas.


Child labor and woman suffrage

Child labor and woman suffrage
Creator: The Club Member
Date: January 1907
This brief article in The Club Member describes the problem of child labor, arguing that in states where women had the right to vote "child labor and illiteracy have ceased to be problems." This information is taken from an article called "Treason of the Senate" by David Graham Phillips.


Chivalry or the Ballot!  Which? Or Aren't You Asking too Much for That Seat, Brother?

Chivalry or the Ballot! Which? Or Aren't You Asking too Much for That Seat, Brother?
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: November 5, 1912
This leaflet was prepared and distributed by the Good Government Club of Topeka. It was supporting the passage of the women's voting rights amendment on the November 5, 1912 ballot. The pamphlet addresses the question that if women want equal rights they should not expect courtesies from men in a somewhat aggressive manner. It was authored by Lilla Day Monroe, president of the Good Government Club.


Circular of the State Impartial Suffrage Association

Circular of the State Impartial Suffrage Association
Date: 1867
This circular describes the efforts to secure suffrage for blacks and women in the state of Kansas. The flyer indicates the Henry B. Blackwell of New York and Mrs. Lucy Stone were traveling in Kansas at that time. The Association was being organized in 1867. S. N. Wood was the corresponding secretary for the association. There is a hand written note on the back from H. C. Whitney, Lawrence, Kansas, indicating his willingness to speak for the group.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: Between 1845 and 1861
This photograph is a studio portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols. In 1854 Nichols joined the New England Emigrant Aid Society and moved her family to a claim in southern Douglas County, near Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Her husband died the next year and in 1856 Nichols moved the family to Wyandotte County where she became associate editor of the Quindaro Chindowan, an abolitionist newspaper. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859 where she secured liberal property rights for Kansas women, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: between 1855 and 1861
Portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, 1810-1885. Nichols and her husband settled in Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, where she was active in politics and women's rights. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859, where she secured for Kansas women liberal property rights, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Clyde Reed to Maude Younger correspondence

Clyde Reed to Maude Younger correspondence
Creator: Reed, Clyde Martin, 1871-1949
Date: June 5, 1919 to June 12, 1919
Clyde Reed, secretary to Kansas Governor Henry Allen of Topeka, Kansas, writes to Maude Younger of the National Woman's Party in Washington D.C. advising her of a special session of the Kansas legislature for the purpose of ratifying the woman's right to vote. On June 5, 1919, Miss Younger, Chairman of the Lobby Committee, had appealed to Governor Allen in calling a special session for purposes of ratifying the suffrage amendment saying, "This struggle has already taken forty-one years of sacrifice."


Congressman Davis Before the United State Senate Committee

Congressman Davis Before the United State Senate Committee
Creator: Davis, John, 1826-1901
Date: May, 1894
Congressman John Davis of Kansas testified for political rights for women before the United States Special Committee on Woman Suffrage on February 21, 1894. He was introduced by Mrs. Annie L. Diggs. Her introduction and his testimony were published in the May 1894 issue of The National Bulletin, Vol. 3, No. 2, Washington, D. C. Davis offered a number of arguments in support of voting rights for women.


Convention of the Kansas State Suffrage Association/League of Women Voters

Convention of the Kansas State Suffrage Association/League of Women Voters
Creator: Kansas State Suffrage Association
Date: July 10, 1919-July 11, 1919
This program is for a joint convention of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and the League of Women Voters of Kansas. The event was held at the Hotel Lassen in Wichita, Kansas, June 10-11, 1919. It lists the order of events and the participants, with some hand written corrections. The officers are listed as is the committee handling the arrangements. Several well-known female activists in Kansas were involved.


Delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, Topeka, Kansas

Delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1916
A photograph showing a group of delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in Topeka, Shawnee County. This group voted to affiliate with the national association as support for a women's suffrage amendment to the U. S. Constitution. Kansas women had already won the right to vote in 1912.


E. W. Hoch to Lilla Day Monroe

E. W. Hoch to Lilla Day Monroe
Creator: The Club Member
Date: July 1908
This eloquent letter, which serves as the frontspiece of the July 1908 issue, outlines E. W. Hoch's reasons for supporting women's suffrage. Hoch wrote that "the right to participate in government rests primarily, I think, upon the ability to contribute virtue and intelligence to government and that women possess this fundamental qualification." Above the letter is a formal portrait of Hoch. Lilla Day Monroe, the recipient of the original letter, was editor of The Club Member and an active supporter of women's rights.


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