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A. G. Brown and Moses Chambers, prisoners 9178 and 3250

A. G. Brown and Moses Chambers, prisoners 9178 and 3250
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: January 30, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, A. G. Brown, prisoner #9178 and Moses Chambers, prisoner #3250. A.G. Brown was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on December 22, 1899 from Oklahoma for forgery. Inmate Moses Chambers was received on May 14, 1884 from Leavenworth County, Kansas for murder and sentenced to death by hanging.


A. J. Stinnett and George Stevens, prisoners 9311 and 7732

A. J. Stinnett and George Stevens, prisoners 9311 and 7732
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: January 26, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, A. J. Stinnett, prisoner #9311 and George Stevens, prisoner #7732. A.J Stinnett was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on April 6, 1900 from Oklahoma for shooting with intent to kill. Inmate George Stevens was received at the penitentiary on March 28, 1896 for murder from Montgomery County, Kansas.


A. L. Lemley and Morgan Wright, prisoners 8990 and 6774

A. L. Lemley and Morgan Wright, prisoners 8990 and 6774
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: January 30, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, A. L. Lemley, prisoner #8990 and Morgan Wright, prisoner #6774. A.L. Lemley was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on Jly 1, 1899 for larceny from Sedgwick County, Kansas. Inmate Morgan Wright was received at the penitentiary on December 28, 1893 from Cowley County, Kansas for murder.


A hanging in Kansas

A hanging in Kansas
Creator: Topeka State Journal Company
Date: February 18, 1916
This newspaper article published in the Topeka State Journal illustrates the confusion surrounding the history of state death penalty laws in Kansas. The article concerns the possible execution, under federal law, of a convict at the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth. The article claims that should this execution proceed "Kansas will see its first legal hanging in its history as a state." The article concludes by saying "that there never has been a hanging under state law in Kansas." In fact, between 1862-1888 there were nine legal executions in Kansas under state law, three under military law, and two under federal law. The state repealed its capital punishment law in 1907.


Albert Denham, prisoner 4529

Albert Denham, prisoner 4529
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 2, 1901
This photograph shows inmate, Albert Denham, prisoner #4529. He was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on October 14, 1887 from McPherson County, Kansas for murder. Possible variations of his given name includes Alfred.


Alfred Hatfield and Richard Roe, prisoners 9166 and 8714

Alfred Hatfield and Richard Roe, prisoners 9166 and 8714
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 4, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, Alfred Hatfield, prisoner #9166 and Richard Roe, prisoner #8714. Alfred Hatfield was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on December 16, 1899 from Sedgwick County, Kansas for murder. Inmate Richard Roe was received at the penitentiary on November 15, 1898 from Oklahoma for burglary. Aliases for Richard Roe includes H.C. Boekewyer, Bockeymer and Bockymeyer.


Alvin Ballard and Peter Geotz, prisoners 8512 and 9334

Alvin Ballard and Peter Geotz, prisoners 8512 and 9334
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 4, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, Alvin Ballard, prisoner #8512 and Peter Geotz, prisoner #9334. Alvin Ballard was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on March 27, 1898 from Sedgwick County, Kansas for burglary and larceny. Inmate Peter Geotz was received on April 28, 1900 from Ellis County, Kansas for murder. Varient spelling of his surname includes Goetz.


Amos Phillips and George Lyon, prisoners 9223 and 8736

Amos Phillips and George Lyon, prisoners 9223 and 8736
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: January 31, 1900
This photograph shows inmates, Amos Phillips, prisoner #9223 and George Lyon, prisoner #8736. Amos Phillips was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on February 19, 1900 from Bourbon County, Kansas for murder. Inmate George Lyon was received at the penitentiary on December 1, 1898 from Douglas County, Kansas for larceny. Varient spelling of his surnmae includes Lyons.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: January 31, 1985-April 09, 1985
The Kansas Legislature passed H.B. 2135 on April 2, 1985. The bill proposed to reinstate capital punishment in Kansas. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. Governor John Carlin vetoed the bill, his fourth and final veto of a death penalty bill during his eight year administration. The legislature failed to override the veto. Kansas reinstituted capital punishment in 1994. The cover sheet recording legislative and gubernatorial action on the legislation is included with the vetoed bill.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: February 20, 1990
The Kansas Legislature passed Senate Bill 77 in 1990. Known as the "hard-40" bill, the bill allowed for a maximum forty-year prison sentence for persons convicted of premeditated murder. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. A strong supporter of capital punishment, Governor Mike Hayden signed the forty-year bill after efforts to pass a death penalty bill failed in the legislature. Kansas did not reinstate capital punishment until 1994.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: April 22, 1994
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 2578 on April 8, 1994. The bill reinstated the death penalty for the crime of capital murder, as defined in the bill. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. The murder of 19 year old college student Stephanie Schmidt in 1993 prompted reinstatement of the law, ending 22 years of debate. Though opposed to capital punishment, Governor Joan Finney allowed the bill to become law without her signature, April 22, 1994. The absence of the governor's signature is apparent on the official enrolled version of the bill represented here.


An act regulating crimes and punishment of crimes against the persons of individuals

An act regulating crimes and punishment of crimes against the persons of individuals
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1862
Chapter 33, Section 3 of the General Laws of the State of Kansas (1862) provides for punishment by death for persons convicted of murder in the first degree. The legislature passed the law at its second annual session ending March 6, 1862. The previous year, the legislature passed a death penalty law for persons convicted of treason against the state. These laws demonstrates the state's initial stance on capital punishment.


An act relating to crimes and penalties

An act relating to crimes and penalties
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. This bill file includes several different versions of the bill. The final version of the bill prescribes the punishment of death or life imprisonment for persons convicted of first degree murder. The bill allows the jury trying the case to decide the form of punishment. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870. See also, "Punishment for Murder in the First and Second Degree," Laws of Kansas, 1935, Chapter 154.


An act relating to crimes punishable by death

An act relating to crimes punishable by death
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. A companion bill, House Bill 11 (1935), prescribed hanging as the method for inflicting the death penalty in all cases. The bill also provided for the executioner, the time and place of execution, and cases of insanity, pregnancy, and escape. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870.


An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree

An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1955
In 1955, the Kansas Legislature expanded the state's capital punishment law with Senate Bill 80 to include the crime of kidnapping. Since the death penalty was reinstated in Kansas in 1935, after its repeal in 1907, only persons convicted of first degree murder were eligible for execution. Senate Bill 80 limits the application of the death penalty to kidnappers who have harmed their captives, though in case of a jury trial the jury is to assign the punishment. While no state-authorized executions occurred in Kansas between 1870-1944, the state executed fifteen persons between 1944-1965.


An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901

An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1907
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 66 by January 18 and Governor Edward W. Hoch signed the bill into law on January 30, 1907. The law abolished capital punishment in Kansas by prescribing life imprisonment, instead of the death penalty, as punishment for persons convicted of first degree murder. While executions by state authority were legal in Kansas from 1861-1907, the legislature imposed tighter regulations in 1872 that required the time of execution to be ordered by the governor. Kansas governors between 1872-1907 refused to issue execution orders, as required by law, effectively banning state authorized executions during that period. Governor Hoch was a strong opponent of capital punishment.


Andrew J. Massingill, prisoner 9678

Andrew J. Massingill, prisoner 9678
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: March 9, 1901
This photograph shows inmate, Andrew J. Massingill, prisoner #9678. He was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on March 9, 1901 from Sheridan County, Kansas for murder.


Andrew Turner and George Fullenn, prisoners 9325 and 9451

Andrew Turner and George Fullenn, prisoners 9325 and 9451
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 15, 1901
This photograph of inmates, Andrew Turner, prisoner #9325 and George Fullenn, prisoner #9451. Andrew Turner was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on April 18, 1900 from Pottawatomie County, Kansas for murder. Varient spellings of George Fullenn's surname includes Fullem.


Andrew Turner, prisoner 9325

Andrew Turner, prisoner 9325
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: Date Unknown
This photograph shows inmate, Andrew Turner, prisoner #9325, of the Kansas State Penitentiary.


Anthony Hamilton and William Ross, prisoners 8409 and 6191

Anthony Hamilton and William Ross, prisoners 8409 and 6191
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 1, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, Anthony Hamilton, prisoner #8409 and William Ross, prisoner #6191. Anthony Hamilton was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on January 8, 1898 from Shawnee County, Kansas for larceny. Inmate William Ross was received at the penitentiary on May 7, 1892 from Ellsworth County, Kansas for murder.


B. B. Comer and George Scott, prisoners 9478 and 9508

B. B. Comer and George Scott, prisoners 9478 and 9508
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: March 20, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, B. B. Comer, prisoner #9478 and George Scott, prisoner #9508. B.B. Comer was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on October 2, 1900 from Chatauqua County, Kansas for murder. Inmate George Scott was received at the penitentiary on October 27, 1900 from Oklahoma for larceny.


Ben McClellan and William Reagor, prisoners 9339 and 8773

Ben McClellan and William Reagor, prisoners 9339 and 8773
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 1, 1900
This photograph shows inmates, Ben McClellan, prisoner #9339 and William Reagor, prisoner #8773. Ben McClellan was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on May 1, 1900 from Cloud County, Kansas for murder. Inmate William Reagor was received at the penitentiary on December 27, 1898 from Oklahoma for robbery. An alias used by him was Will Wrigley.


Bender family house

Bender family house
Creator: Tresslar Brothers
Date: 1873
This is a stereographic photo of the Bender house in Labette County, Kansas. The "Bloody Benders" as the family would later be known, killed at least eleven people and buried them in the surrounding yard. A massive manhunt for them stretched over several states but the Benders were never caught.


Bender family house, Labette County, Kansas

Bender family house, Labette County, Kansas
Creator: Gamble, G. R.
Date: 1872
This is a photograph showing people on the north or front side of the Bender house. The Bender family operated a remote road house on a farm near Cherryvale, Kansas. When several travelers disappeared, local residents became suspicious of the Benders. A search of the property revealed eleven bodies buried in the yard and all of them died of injuries consistent with blows to the head. The Bender family members escaped and were never found.


Bender farm

Bender farm
Creator: Gamble, G. R.
Date: 1873
This photograph shows the graves found behind the Bender farm, Labette County, Kansas. The Bender family operated a remote road house on a farm near Cherryvale, Kansas. When several travelers disappeared, local residents became suspicious of the Benders. A search of the property revealed eleven bodies buried in the yard and all of them died of injuries consistent with blows to the head. The Bender family members escaped and were never found.


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