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1963-1964 Kansas Legislature

1963-1964 Kansas Legislature
Date: Between January 01, 1963 and December 31, 1964
This roster represents the Kansas Legislature in office from 1963 to 1964 while Govenror John Anderson Jr. was in office.


A. J. Arnold to Joseph Hebbard

A. J. Arnold to Joseph Hebbard
Creator: Arnold, A. J.
Date: August 11, 1892
In this brief but informative letter A. J. Arnold, a Topeka, Kansas, druggist, informs Joseph Hebbard, treasurer of the Farmer's Alliance, of his decision to switch his allegiance from the Democratic Party to the People's (Populist) Party. He is eager to "release the state of Kansas from the misrule of the Republican Party." While Arnold is confident that he has made the right decision, he also notes that many other Democrats are wavering. Consequently, Arnold has prepared a letter to the Democrats that expresses the benefits of supporting Populism; he asks Hebbard to read through the draft of this letter and provide comments. This enclosure is not with the original letter and has not been located.


Address to the Voters of Kansas

Address to the Voters of Kansas
Creator: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 25, 1867
The numerous authors of this pamphlet (Republicans) support the constitutional amendments to approve voting rights for blacks, for women, and to restrict voting rights to "loyal persons." They offer arguments for their position as well as criticizing the Democratic Party in Kansas for their opposition to these amendments. Forty five men signed the document, which was the result of a meeting in Lawrence. The following signed the document S. C. Pomeroy, Atchison; E. G. Ross, Lawrence; S. J. Crawford, Topeka; N. Green, Manhattan; Chas. Robinson, Lawrence; Geo T. Anthony, Leavenworth; Lewis Bodwell, Topeka; R. B. Taylor, editor Wyandotte Gazette; J. P. Root, Whandotte; James Rogers, Burlingame; S. Weaver, Editor Lecompton New Era; L. R. Elliott, Editor Atchison Daily Free Press; W. A. Starrett, Lawrence; Wm. Larimer, Jr., Leavenworth; John Ritchie, Topeka; John Ekin, Topeka; Sol. Miller, Editor White Cloud Chief; A. H. Foote, Lawrence; C. B. Lines, Wabaunsee; R. G. Elliott, Jefferson county; G. A. Crawford, Bourbon county; John Speer, Kansas Tribune; A. Low, Doniphan; R. W. Jenkins, Pottawatomie county; Ed. Russell, Leavenworth; J. H. Pillsbury, Editor Manhattan Independent; S. D. Houston, Manhattan; W. K. Marshall, Atchison; F. G. Adams, Kennekuk; P. L. Hubbard, Atchison; A. Hunting, Manhattan; J. B. Abbott, De Soto; Joseph Denison, Manhattan; T. H. Baker, Manhattan, H. W. Farnsworth, Topeka; I. H. Smith, Topeka; D. R. Anthony, Leavenworth; G. W. Higginbotham, Manhattan; John Pipher, Manhattan, R. L. Harford, Manhattan; Jas. Humphrey, Manhattan; Wm McKay, Manhattan; R. P. Duvall, Manhattan; Pardee Butler, Pardee; and L. F. Green, Baldwin City. Only the language restricting voting to "loyal" persons was passed in the election on November 5, 1867. Blacks and women were not given voting rights as a result of the 1867 election.


Albert H. Thayer, Tariff Truths

Albert H. Thayer, Tariff Truths
Creator: Thayer, Albert H.
Date: August 1888
Albert F. Thayer of Maple Hill, Kansas, wrote this pamphlet addressed to the farmers of Wabaunsee County to explain why he was going to vote a Democratic ticket in the upcoming election. He wrote that he had voted for Republicans since 1861. The pamphlet deals with tariff issues from what became the Populist perspective. He gives examples of the cost of groceries and clothing with and without protective tariffs.


Alson C. Davis to John A. Halderman

Alson C. Davis to John A. Halderman
Creator: Davis, Alson C.
Date: June 19, 1857
Alson C. Davis, a Democrat legislator and party leader from Leavenworth (later Wyandotte) County, writes from Wyandotte that he strongly favors "the establishment of a first class democratic paper" in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. Davis believes this was vital "to the Cincinnati Platform Democracy," and is willing to pledge an additional $400 to the cause. A Mr. Beach had previously offered to give John Halderman "a bonus of two thousand dollars" with which to start such a newspaper.


A message and plan for county candidates

A message and plan for county candidates
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
This pamphlet was prepared by the chairmen and secretaries of the People's Party and the Democrats. They were working on a "fusion" or merged ticket that would be supported by both Democrats and Populists. The pamphlet gives very specific instructions about how to attract Republican voters who are discontented with that party. It is addressed to party workers at the county level and advocates a very grass roots approach to the campaign. The Peoples Party chairman was W. J. Babb and the secretary was J. H. Curran. The Democratic chairman was H. P. Farrelly and the secretary was Chas. McCrum.


Andrew H. Reeder to William Hutchinson

Andrew H. Reeder to William Hutchinson
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: August 25, 1856
This letter from Andrew H. Reeder to William Hutchinson describes Reeder's efforts to raise money for the Free State cause in his travels through the northern states.


Annie Glenn, Jack Carlin, Hazel Carlin, and John Glenn in Topeka, Kansas

Annie Glenn, Jack Carlin, Hazel Carlin, and John Glenn in Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Ozegovic, Ann Carlin
Date: 1982
This is a photograph showing (left to right) Annie Glenn, wife of John Glenn; Jack Carlin, father of Governor John Carlin; Hazel Carlin, mother of Governor John Carlin; and United States Senator John Glenn who was the keynote speaker at a Democratic Washington Day meeting in Topeka, Kansas. Glenn, a distinguished pilot, engineer, and astronaut was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on five occasions, held the Air Medal with 18 clusters for his service during World War II and Korea, the Navy Unit Commendation for Service in Korea, the Asiatic-Pacific-Campaign Medal, National Space Medal of Honor, and the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. On February 20, 1962, Glenn became the first American to orbit the earth, completing three orbits and reaching a maximum altitude of 162 statute miles. In addition to his many achievements, Glenn was elected United States Senator from Ohio in 1974 and served through January 3, 1999. In 1984, Glenn was a Democratic presidential candidate, but he withdrew on March 16, 1984 when his campaign became mired in debt and he was behind both Gary Hart and Walter Mondale. In 1998, while still a sitting senator, he became the oldest person to fly in space, and the only one to fly in both the Mercury and Discovery Space Shuttle programs. President Obama awarded Glenn the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows a crowd of people at an anti-war rally on the grounds of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration attended by about 1,200 college students, was held to protest the United States involvement in Cambodia and to ask Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows a crowd of people at an anti-war rally on the grounds of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration attended by about 1,200 college students, was held to protest the United States involvement in Cambodia and to ask Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows students at an anti-war rally on the grounds of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration was attended by about 1,200 college students in protest to the United States involvement in Cambodia asking Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows students at an anti-war rally on the grounds of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration was attended by about 1,200 college students in protest to the United States involvement in Cambodia asking Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows a crowd of people at an anti-war rally on the steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration attended by about 1,200 college students, was held to protest the United States involvement in Cambodia and to ask Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally,Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally,Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows an anti-war rally on the steps of the state capitol in Topeka, Kansas. In the background, a banner reads "Pleading Kansas". The peaceful demonstration lead by university students was held protesting the United States' involvement in Cambodia asking Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Robert Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas

Anti-war rally, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 13, 1970
This black and white photograph shows a crowd of people at the anti-war rally on the grounds of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. The peaceful demonstration attended by about 1,200 college students, was held to protest the United States involvement in Cambodia and to ask Kansas Governor Robert Docking to call a special session of the legislature to consider an anti-war proposal. The proposed legislation would make it unlawful for Kansas citizens to fight outside the United States without a declaration of war by Congress. Governor Docking met with students and accepted their petitions for the special session, but no further action was taken toward the request.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: December 17, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach writes from the New York Hospital to comment on published reports that implied the prospects for Kansas Territory becoming a free state were improving. Darrach shares his thoughts on Republicans and Democrats at the national level and also on the possible reactions of southerners. Darrach asks for news of the petition to free Andrew Reeder and the recent Osawatomie arrests. He describes his personal plans that will prevent him from returning to Kansas Territory for at least two years.


Basic campaign speech

Basic campaign speech
Creator: Carlin, John, 1940-
Date: 1982
This is Governor John Carlin's basic campaign speech for his 1982 gubernatorial reelection campaign. He outlines his accomplishments during his first term as governor: a balanced budget, no growth in the number of state employees, and limited increases in state spending. He also identified several goals for a second administration including property tax relief, enactment of a severance tax on gas and oil producers, improvements in education, and transportation enhancements. Governor Carlin defeated Sam Hardage in the 1982 election and served a second term as governor.


Big government

Big government
Creator: Carlin, John William, 1940-
Date: October 1978
A television campaign advertisement supporting John Carlin for the Democratic candidate for the governor of Kansas. Directed by Jim O'Neil. Virgil Harper, director of photography. Produced by Evans & Bartholomew. The ad was paid for by Kansans for John Carlin.


Bond Holders and Bread Winners: A Portrayal of Some Political Crimes Committed in the Name of Liberty

Bond Holders and Bread Winners: A Portrayal of Some Political Crimes Committed in the Name of Liberty
Creator: King, S. S.
Date: April, 1892
S. S. King was a member of the Kansas City, Kansas, Bar Association. King was an ardent Populist, and the pamphlet details the causes of the harm done working people (laborers and farmers) by the wealthier classes and the economic system. He includes statistics from the Census Bureau, as well as an appendix with voting statistics in Kansas in 1890 and 1891. King offers some suggestions for changes to aid working people. The page opposite the inside title page contains information about the People's Party of Kansas. The pamphlet was published by the Arena Publishing Company of Boston, Massachusetts, and several pages reference other populist publications, some of which were written by Kansas authors. The text is the same as item # 207835 but there are differences in the pages before and after the main text.


C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair

C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Dick, Campbell Graham
Date: April 21, 1857
Campbell G. Dick was Reverend Adair's brother-in-law, and wrote from his home in Marshall, Highland County, Ohio, that he supported the American Missionary Association as it promoted Christianity, but was pessimistic about the chances for Kansas Territory entering the Union as a free state. He wrote that the Democratic party was controlled by the south, and asked Adair to inform him if free state men intended to vote in the elections called by the "Bogus Legislature."


Carlin, Docking. A new tradition for Kansas

Carlin, Docking. A new tradition for Kansas
Creator: Carlin, John William, 1940-
Date: 1982
This is a brochure from Governor John Carlin's second gubernatorial campaign in 1982 against Sam Hardage. Governor Carlin highlights the accomplishments of his first administration including: limiting growth in the size of government, lowering taxes, improving public safety, and enhancing economic development. He also advocates for the enactment of a severance tax on gas and oil producers as a way to promote tax fairness in the state. Governor Carlin defeated Sam Hardage in the 1982 election and served a second term as governor.


Carlin for governor campaign brochure

Carlin for governor campaign brochure
Creator: Carlin, John William, 1940-
Date: 1978
This brochure is from John Carlin's first gubernatorial campaign, in 1978, against Governor Robert Bennett. The brochure includes a brief biographical sketch of Carlin, quotations that Kansas government needs to be more responsive to citizens, and statements claiming that his opponent, has raised property taxes too much. Carlin went on to defeat Governor Bennet in the November general election.


Champion Vaughan to S.O.Thacher and others

Champion Vaughan to S.O.Thacher and others
Date: July 7, 1859
Vaughan, editor of the Leavenworth Times, wrote this letter soon after the convention convened to introduce and lend his support to three "Delegates elect from Southern Nebraska to the Kansas Convention." They had convinced Vaughan that efforts toward annexation were not just more Democratic politics.


Charles M. F. Striger to Governor John P. St. John

Charles M. F. Striger to Governor John P. St. John
Creator: Striger, Charles M. F.
Date: May 18, 1879
In this letter Charles Striger, a radical Republican from Kentucky, expresses his concern for free blacks in the South. With rather forceful language he berates Southern Democrats for their harassment of blacks. He also asks Gov. St. John to convince the North that it is their duty to aid any refugees seeking solace from Southern white oppression.


Charles Robinson to Henry Wilson

Charles Robinson to Henry Wilson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believes that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicts no Kansas admission until at least December, 1859, and in the meantime expects Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."


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