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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1850s
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.


Absalom White territorial loss claim

Absalom White territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Absalom White filed claim #246 for the loss of an arm as a result of being struck by a bullet at a battle with southerners near the H. T. Titus [probably Henry C.] home in Douglas County. The arm was subsequently amputated. The claim was not allowed on the grounds that White was "engaged in rebellion and making unwarranted attack on the person and property of a private citizen." Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Albert McDonald Cole

Albert McDonald Cole
Date: Between 1945 and 1953
This black and white photograph shows Albert McDonald Cole. A lawyer and a county attorney from Jackson County, Kansas. Cole began his political career, in 1941, when he was elected to the Kansas Senate as a representative for the counties of Atchison and Jackson. He served in the legislature until 1945 before successfully being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas' first congressional district, (1945-1953). In his 1952 bid for re-election, Cole was narrowly defeated but the loss was attributed to his support for the construction of the Tuttle Creek Dam. After his career in Kansas politics came to a close, Cole later served during the Eisenhower adminsitration as Administrator of the Housing and Home Finance Agency (1953-1959). From 1959 to-1961, he served as vice president of Reynolds Aluminum Service Corp. and president of Reynolds Metals Development Corp.(1961-1967).


Alicia Vandahl to Representative Albert Cole

Alicia Vandahl to Representative Albert Cole
Creator: Vandahl, Alicia
Date: February 04, 1952
This letter was written by Alicia Vandahl, Randolph, Kansas, to United States Representative Albert Cole, Washington, D.C. She writes in opposition to building Tuttle Creek dam because she believes it will not be just one dam but will lead to 20 to 40 others. She doesn't want Kansas river valleys destroyed and believes the dams won't prevent flooding. She wants the issue studied and asks Cole to wait until the President's Missouri Basin Review Committee completes its study.


Ann Hopper territorial loss claim

Ann Hopper territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
This claim appears in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 2nd Session, 35th Congress, Miscellaneous Documents, 1858-1859, and was reported by H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas in 1857. Claim #240 was filed on behalf of Ann Hopper, who lived with her son John L. Hopper, near Lawrence. The items listed were destroyed or stolen in August and September, 1856, and included animals, crops and household items. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas

Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas
Date: August 1, 1928
This photograph shows Senator Arthur Capper, Kansas Governor Ben Paulin, Vice President Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray standing from left to right while visiting the Pawnee Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas on August 1, 1928. The men visited the Pawnee Capitol, commonly referred to as the First Territorial Capitol at Fort Riley, when Senator Capper was visiting Kansas. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Arthur Capper, Charles Curtis, and John W. Thomas

Arthur Capper, Charles Curtis, and John W. Thomas
Creator: Henry Miller News Picture Service
Date: June 22, 1929
Arthur Capper, United States senator from Kansas, Charles Curtis, vice president of the United States, and John W. Thomas, United States senator from Idaho, in Washington, D. C., are photographed with 4-H Club members from Kansas. Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.


Benjamin D. Castleman territorial loss claim

Benjamin D. Castleman territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Benjamin D. Castleman, Tecumseh, Shawnee County, presented claim #216 for losses suffered in August and September, 1856. He operated as a merchant so his claim listed groceries, clothing, dry goods, medicines, guns, hardware, books and stationery, and tin and glassware. He stated that the damage was caused by about 50 well armed men under the command of James H. Lane and another group of 200 men under the command of "Captains A. Jameson, Cleveland, and Charles Moffet." Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Benjamin S. Hancock territorial loss claim

Benjamin S. Hancock territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Benjamin S. Hancock submitted claim # 163 for agricultural equipment, livestock, and crops that were destroyed at various times in 1855 and 1856. His list of livestock and other items claim is very detailed. He lived near Lecompton in Douglas County. His losses were caused by the territorial militia under the command of several including William Martin, John Randolph, Colonel Titus, General Richardson, and General Stringfellow. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Blake Little territorial loss claim

Blake Little territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. This claim was submitted by Blake Little on behalf of J. H. Little and Company for supplies furnished to the territorial militia on or about August 22, 1856. Mr. Little's store was in Bourbon County. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Campaign brochure for Congressman Keith Sebelius

Campaign brochure for Congressman Keith Sebelius
Creator: Sebelius for Congress
Date: 1976
This is a campaign brochure for Kansas First District Congressman Keith Sebelius. The brochure was mailed to Jack and Hazel Carlin, Smolan, Kansas. The son of the local dentist, Keith G. Sebelius was born in Almena, Norton County, Kansas, on September 10, 1916, and attended Almena public schools. He graduated from Fort Hays Kansas State College in 1939 and the George Washington University Law School in 1942. Sebelius practiced law in Kansas and the District of Columbia and served in the military during World War II and the Korean conflict. He was city councilman, mayor, and city attorney of Almena, Norton County attorney, mayor of Norton, and a state senator (appointed in 1962 and elected in 1964). In 1968 he was elected to the U.S. Congress (served, January 3, 1969-January 3, 1981). After representing the people of Kansas's "Big First" District for a dozen years, Congressman Sebelius chose not to seek reelection in 1980 and returned to his law practice in Norton, where he died on September 5, 1982.


Campaign Sign

Campaign Sign
Creator: Snowbarger, Vincent K.
Date: between 1996 and 1998
Campaign yard sign from either the 1996 or 1998 congressional campaign of Vincent Snowbarger (1949- ). Snowbarger, a Republican, represented Kansas's 3rd District in the 105th Congress, which ran from January 3, 1997 to January 3, 1999. He succeeded Republican Jan Meyers, who retired after twelve years in office. He lost his 1998 re-election campaign to Democratic challenger Dennis Moore. Prior to serving in Congress, Snowbarger served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1985 to 1996.


Charles Curits correspondence, 1894

Charles Curits correspondence, 1894
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1894
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, 1895-1896

Charles Curtis correspondence, 1895-1896
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1895-1896
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, 1897

Charles Curtis correspondence, 1897
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1897
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, 1898-1899

Charles Curtis correspondence, 1898-1899
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1898-1899
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, 1900-1902

Charles Curtis correspondence, 1900-1902
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1900
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, 1923-1928

Charles Curtis correspondence, 1923-1928
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: 1923-1928
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis correspondence, undated

Charles Curtis correspondence, undated
Creator: Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936
Date: Between 1894 and 1910
These letters are written by Charles Curtis and pulled from the Howel Jones and Ross Burns Collection. Charles Curtis was born January 25, 1860, in North Topeka, Kansas. He was descended from White Plume, chief of the Kaw Tribe, and Louis Pappan, one of the original settlers of North Topeka. He served as County Attorney from 1884-1889. In 1892, he was elected to the House of Representatives; he served in that body until his election to the Senate in 1907. He continued to serve in the Senate until his election to the vice-presidency under Herbert Hoover in 1928. He was the first Native American to be elected to national office. Howel Jones was a railroad officer; attorney; friend and senatorial campaign manager of Charles Curtis. His father-in-law is Ross Burns, who served in the Civil War in Battery A, 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia.


Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States

Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States
Date: Between 1920 and 1933
Portrait of Charles Curtis, 1860-1936, United States Congressman, 1893-1907, U. S. Senator, 1907-1913 and 1915-1929, and Vice President of the United States, 1929-1933.


Charles Patrick (Pat)  Roberts

Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts
Date: 1996
A portrait of Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts, born April 20, 1936, in Topeka, Kansas. After graduating from Kansas State University in 1958, Roberts served in the United States Marine Corps for four years and then worked as a reporter and editor for several Arizona newspapers. He joined the staff of United States Senator Frank Carlson in 1967. In 1969, Roberts became Administrative Assistant to U.S. Congressman Keith Sebelius. Roberts was elected to Congress in 1980, succeeding Sebelius upon his retirement. He was first elected to the U. S. Senate in 1996 following the retirement of Senator Nancy Kassebaum Baker and own-election in 2002.


Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts

Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts
Date: Between 1997 and 2007
A portrait of Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts, who was elected in 1980 to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas' first congressional district. He served until 1997, when he was elected to the U.S. Senate. As a senator, he chaired the Senate Intelligence Committee and subcommitte on Emgerging Threats and Capabilities.


Charles Robinson territorial loss claim

Charles Robinson territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Charles Robinson presented this claim (# 61) for losses suffered at the hands of the "territorial militia and marshal's posse" on May 21, 1856. His list of losses included a frame house, barn, medical library and surgical instruments. He also claimed $10,000 for false imprisonment that was not approved. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Chester Louis Mize

Chester Louis Mize
Date: Between 1965 and 1971
Chester Louis Mize from Atchison, Kansas, owned and operated a cattle ranch in New Mexico and a farm in Atchison, Kansas. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1965-1971, and was chairman of the United States Tariff Commission.


Clifford Hope

Clifford Hope
Creator: Forsythe
Date: February 1953
A black and white photo of U.S. Congressmen Clifford Hope from Kansas and members of the Cotton Advistory Group and Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson. Left to Right seated: Rep. Clifford R. Hope, (R.Kansas) Chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, and Secretary Ezra Taft Benson. Standing: J.F. McLauin, President, National Cotton Ginners Association, Bennetsville, South Carolina; Alonza Bennett, Vice President, Federal Compressing and Warehousing Co., Memphis, Tenn.; Charles Cannon, President, Cannon Mills, Kannapolis, N.C.; George Wilson, President, California Farm Bureau Federation, Berkeley, Calif.; W.B. Coberly, jr., President National Cottonseed Products Association, Los Angeles, Calif.; A. M. Crawford, President, American Cotton Shippers Assoication, Memphis, Tenn.


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