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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Citizens of Dodge City to Governor George W. Glick

Citizens of Dodge City to Governor George W. Glick
Creator: Citizens of Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas
Date: May 15, 1883
Twelve citizens of Dodge City, Kansas, write Governor George W. Glick, of Topeka, protesting the forcible removal of Luke Short from Dodge City. The letter recounts the events which led to Mr. Short's removal and testifies regarding his character. The events recounted occurred between April 26 and May 1, 1883. The letter refers to Short's employment of women singers at his Long Branch Saloon and their subsequent arrest, a shooting between Short and Louis Hartman (special policeman), the arrest of Short and Hartman, the intimidation of Short's attorneys, and the Mayor's (L. E. Deger) insistence that Short (and others) be escorted out of the city. An appended newspaper article recounts events occurring between May 1 and May 10, 1883, specifically the attempted return of two men formerly jailed with Short. Dodge City Times editor, Nick Klaine, wrote the article and was an enthusiastic supporter of Deger's recently elected reform party. The arrest of Short's women employees is often credited as beginning the "Dodge City War," a bloodless conflict between competing political-business factions.


City council members, Rossville, Kansas

City council members, Rossville, Kansas
Date: 1961
This is a photograph of members of the Rossville, Kansas, city council in February of 1961 Seated left to right are Cletus "Teetle" Reding, Ross McCollough, Frank Stach, LaVerne Spears, Mildred Page, Bill Martinek, Horace Holder, and unidentified. This photograph is provided through a pilot project to host unique cultural heritage materials from local libraries on Kansas Memory and was accomplished by mutual agreement between the Northeast Kansas Library System, the Rossville Community Library, and the Kansas Historical Society.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1854 and 1874
This carte de visite shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1854, as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but successfully led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1880 and 1904
This black and white photograph shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1840 and 1860
This engraving shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successful career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the U.S. army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Creator: Dudensing, R.
Date: Between 1870s and 1890s
This engraving shows Daniel Read, Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and later settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, Anthony's military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Executive circular to metropolitan police commissioners

Executive circular to metropolitan police commissioners
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: December 4, 1893
With this circular, Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling of Topeka, Kansas, appeals to police commissioners of Kansas cities to show restraint in the prosecution of the unemployed. The governor argues that high rates of unemployment are a product of the industrial system of production and not the fault of individuals. Since jobs are not available to all employable persons, he argues, unemployed persons should not be treated as criminals. The governor denounces the vagrancy law for first class cities included in the General Statutes of 1889, and similar city ordinances, which allowed for the arrest, imprisonment, or fine of "all vagrants, tramps, and confidence men and persons found in said city without visible means of support, or some legitimate business." The Kansas Legislature originally enacted the law in 1881. Governor Lewelling was the first People's Party (Populist) candidate to become governor. Republican opponents of the Populist governor dubbed this letter the "Tramp Circular."


Governor Robert Frederick Bennett

Governor Robert Frederick Bennett
Date: Between 1975 and 1979
This black and white photograph shows Robert Frederick Bennett, (1927-2000). He was first elected to public office, in 1955, as a council member for the City of Prairie Village and later the mayor of the city from 1957 to 1965. Bennett successfully ran on the Republican ticket for a seat in the Kansas Senate, (1965 to 1974). He later served as president of the senate from, (1973 to 1974). In 1974, he was elected the thirty-ninth Governor of Kansas, (1975-1979). Bennett is remembered for being an eloquent speaker. He passed away on October 9, 2000 at the age of seventy-three.


Rosedale Memorial Arch Ceremony

Rosedale Memorial Arch Ceremony
Date: July 23, 1988
Speakers, including Councilman Richard Ruiz and U.S. Representative Meyers, at the Rosedale Memorial Arch ceremony. Funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


The first all woman city government, Oskaloosa, Kansas

The first all woman city government, Oskaloosa, Kansas
Date: 1888
A photograph of the first all woman government in the city of Oskaloosa, Kansas. The women are identified as: back row (left to right): Carrie Johnson, Sadie Balsley, Emma Hamilton; front row: Hannah Morse, Mary Loman (mayor), and Mittie Golden. The first all woman city government in Kansas was in Syracuse in 1887.


The mayor and city council of Colby, Thomas County, Kansas, 1900

The mayor and city council of Colby, Thomas County, Kansas, 1900
Date: 1900
This is a formal studio portrait of the mayor and city council of Colby, Thomas County, Kansas in April 1900. The gentlemen are not identified.


Township Trustee Records

Township Trustee Records
Creator: State Board of Agriculture
Date: 1875
This folder contains handwritten reports of the township trustees in each county of Kansas in 1875. Alfred Gray, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture, sent a form to each county superintendent on which they recorded all townships and township trustees in their county. Gray used a printed directory of county superintendents to keep track of the number of trustees in each county. Gray then compiled a master list of all township trustees' names and addresses in alphabetical order by county.


To women voters, be sure to register

To women voters, be sure to register
Creator: Woman's League
Date: March 13, 1902
Distributed by the Woman's League, this handbill urges women to register to vote in the upcoming election in Topeka, Kansas. One seat on the city council and six seats on the school board were up for election. In Kansas, women gained the right to vote in school district elections in 1861 and municipal elections in 1887. In 1912, eight years before the ratification of the national woman suffrage amendment, Kansas became the eighth state to extend equal voting rights to women.


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