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Abandonment of Mattie Marion by Husband

Abandonment of Mattie Marion by Husband
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1913-1915
This file includes general correspondence relating to the abandonment of Mattie Marion by her husband. Topics included, but not limited to, in the correspondence is Mattie Marion being abandoned by her husband after moving to Missouri for him to return to Kansas, procedures to take her husband to court in Kinsley to support her and their child, and the role of the County and General Attorney and Governor in domestic cases. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


C. C. Evans to Governor Edmund Morrill

C. C. Evans to Governor Edmund Morrill
Creator: Evans, C. C.
Date: December 24, 1894
The chairman of the Sheridan County Republican Central Committee, C. C. Evans, of Allison (Decatur County), writes Governor Edmund Morrill to inform him of the desperate circumstances facing farmers in western Kansas and to ask the state to furnish seed grain to the farmers. Several years of drought and low crop yields left many farmers without sufficient seed grain for the next season's crops. Evans asks the governor to rally Republican legislators to quickly pass an appropriation for farm relief. The letter claims that Populists have thwarted local efforts to address the problem and that effective actions by Republicans at this time would attract more people in western Kansas to the Republican Party.


Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States

Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States
Date: Between 1920 and 1933
Portrait of Charles Curtis, 1860-1936, United States Congressman, 1893-1907, U. S. Senator, 1907-1913 and 1915-1929, and Vice President of the United States, 1929-1933.


County Treasurers Charging for Tax Information

County Treasurers Charging for Tax Information
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes a letter from Robert Garvin, County Attorney in St. John, Kansas; as well as a letter from Stafford, Kansas. Primary topics included in the correspondence focuses around County Treasurers and tax bills for citizens. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


First elected officers, Wichita County, Kansas

First elected officers, Wichita County, Kansas
Date: February 08, 1887
This sepia colored photograph shows the first elected officers of Wichita, County, Kansas. The officers have been identified as follows: FIRST ROW: L.G. Moore, County Clerk; C.W. Garland, Probate Judge; and T.F. Calhoon, Register of Deeds. SECOND ROW: C.S. Triplett, Representative; Frank Harper, Commissioner; A.C. Johnson, Commissioner; A. MayGinnes, Commissioner; and R.A. Ramey, Clerk District Court. THIRD ROW: John H. Edwards, Sheriff; J.S. Newby, County Attorney; S.E. Gandy, Treasurer; E.A. Miles, Surveyor; and V.M. Reynolds; Coroner.


Fred Robertson

Fred Robertson
Date: 1909
This is a cabinet card showing Fred Robertson of Atwood, Kansas. He served two terms as attorney for Rawlins County, beginning in 1898. Also, he was chairman of the Board of Education of Atwood and of the county high school. In 1908, his district elected him to the state senate and he served for four years. Robertson was appointed United States District attorney for Kansas on July 1, 1913. The first two years as United States District attorney he resided in Topeka, later making his home in Kansas City, Kansas. He is also a member of the law firm of Thompson & Robertson.


George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin
Date: March 30, 1887
George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.


Governor Arthur Capper's slackers file

Governor Arthur Capper's slackers file
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1917-1918
During American involvement in World War I, Kansas Governor Arthur Capper kept this file of correspondence on suspected German sympathizers and persons thought to be disloyal to the U.S. government. Such persons were commonly referred to as "slackers." The file includes letters from Kansas residents informing the governor of suspected sympathizers or dissidents, letters from Governor Capper to accused residents, letters from accused residents to the governor denying such charges, and letters between the governor's office and various local and federal agencies. Early and widespread, public opposition to American involvement in WWI gave way to fervent patriotism and intolerance of dissent shortly after America entered the conflict in April of 1917. Several federal initiatives under President Woodrow Wilson (such as the Committee on Public Information, the Espionage Act of 1917, and the Sedition Act of 1918) contributed to the domestic war hysteria and placed severe limits on individual civil liberties.


Governor Arthur Capper to Phil Crab

Governor Arthur Capper to Phil Crab
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: June 11, 1918
Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka (Shawnee County) writes to Phil Crab of Ada (Ottawa County) requesting that he donate to the Red Cross. The Governor's request was prompted by a letter from Ottawa County Attorney, Lee Jackson, who informed the Governor of the resident's refusal to donate and the subsequent threats made by local residents against him. During WWI, persons whose allegiance to the United States was suspect were often referred to as "slackers." In his letter, the Governor encourages Mr. Crab to support the war by donating to the Red Cross and assures him that he will be considered a "disloyal citizen" or "slacker" if he does not. See Lee Jackson to Governor Arthur Capper, 8 June 1918.


Governor Payne Harry Ratner

Governor Payne Harry Ratner
Date: Between 1929 and 1939
This portrait represents Payne Harry Ratner. Ratner was the first resident of Labette County to be elected as County Attorney, holding office from 1923 to 1927. After serving as County Attorney, he went on to serve in the Kansas State Senate from 1929 to 1939, and then later served two terms as Kansas Governor from 1939 to 1943. Notable programs during his administration was implementing a teachers' pension plan and a state employee merit system.


Ira J. Lacock

Ira J. Lacock
Creator: Hickox, R.A., Hiawatha, Kansas
Date: Between 1884 and 1889
This cabinet card shows Ira J. Lacock (1831-1900), a lawyer from Hiawatha, Kansas. Lacock was a native of Washington County, Pennsylvania and graduated from Washington and Jefferson College in 1856 and later admitted to the bar in 1858. He moved in 1860 to Hiawatha, Kansas where he built a thriving law practice. During the Civil War, he organized and became captain of the Hiawatha Guards. This local militia attempted to join the First Kansas Infantry but later disbanded when their services were not needed. In 1862, he ran on the Republican ticket and was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from the eleventh district. He was re-elected in 1863 and in 1865. At the start of Lancock's third term, his constituents asked that he resign for his failure to support a bill that allowed the railroad companies to obtain land that was originally entitled to the school district. On February 12, 1866, Lacock resigned his seat in the legislature and returned to Hiawatha. On August 16, 1866, he purchased the Union Sentinel newspaper. For a year he published and edited the paper before selling it on November 7, 1867. He was elected county attorney of Brown County in 1872, 1878, and 1888. For a number of years he also served as a Mason and master of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 35. On June 18, 1900 while addressing a meeting at the court house, Ira J. Lacock dropped to the floor dead at the age of sixty-nine.


James Blackwood Pearson

James Blackwood Pearson
Date: Between 1962 and 1978
This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2009). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas from 1952-1954 and as a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the Senate until 1978.


James Blackwood Pearson

James Blackwood Pearson
Date: Between 1962 and 1978
This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2011). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas, from 1952-1954 and a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the Senate until 1978.


James Blackwood Pearson

James Blackwood Pearson
Date: Between 1962 and 1978
This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2009). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas, from 1952-1954, and as a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the U. S. Senate until 1978.


John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls
Creator: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Date: March 15, 1859
Although Ingalls began this relatively brief letter from Sumner with comments on the local election (he won the race for city attorney), he devoted most of it to the Pike's Peak Gold Rush--"the amount and character of the emigration to Pike's Peak is truly astonishing. . . . [T] military roads are already thronged with anxious hundreds, on foot, dragging hand carts, on mules, and with ox teams."


Lee Jackson to Governor Arthur Capper

Lee Jackson to Governor Arthur Capper
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: June 8, 1918
Ottawa County Attorney, Lee Jackson, writes Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka (Shawnee County) requesting that he ask Phil Crab an Ada (Ottawa County) resident to donate to the Red Cross. Mr. Crab's refusal to donate to the Red Cross made him the object of ridicule and harassment by other local residents. During WWI, the domestic effort to support the war created an expectation that every citizen would contribute in various ways, including cash donations. Persons who did not meet this expectation, who were critical of the government, or were suspected of being German sympathizers were often referred to as "slackers." Governor Arthur Capper maintained a "slacker" file in his office and frequently appealed to individual Kansas citizens to support the war. See Governor Arthur Capper to Phil Crab, June 11, 1918.


Michael Sutton's law office in Dodge City, Kansas

Michael Sutton's law office in Dodge City, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1895
This photograph, which was made from a glass plate negative, shows attorney Michael Westernhouse Sutton in his office in Dodge City, Kansas. Sutton was born in Orange County, New York in 1848 and raised in Tompkins County, living there until November, 1867. He then moved with his family to Johnson County, Missouri, where he attended school. He began reading law and was admitted to the bar in March 1872 at Warrensburg, Missouri. After the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in Company B, Sixth Regiment New York Heavy Artillery in February 1863. Sutton was mustered out August 24, 1865. He came to Kansas in May 1872, where he settled and practiced law in Wellington until December. Then in Medicine Lodge he practiced private law and served as the Barber County attorney for two years. In June 1876, when he moved to Dodge City, he established the firm of Sutton & Wenie. In 1879, he married Florence E. Clemons, of Genesee County, New York and the couple had one child. He served as Ford County Attorney from November 1, 1876 until March 1882. An avid prohibitionist, Sutton served in the Kansas House of Representatives in 1893.


Richard Dean Rogers

Richard Dean Rogers
Date: Between 1954 and 1958
A photograph of Richard Dean Rogers, Riley County Attorney. He later served as a United States District Court Judge.


Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas

Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas
Date: 1900-1945
Multiple scenes of Sherman County, Kansas. The photograph showing the County Clerk's office, pictured left to right are: Mrs. C.W. Jupe, Lizzie Mae Jupe Farrell, A. Zuspann (County Commissioner), Ray Stanley (County Commissioner), Herold Daise (County Commissioner), Hal Everett (County Engineer), and Jaggard (County Attorney).


Vern Miller

Vern Miller
Date: Between 1970 and 1974
A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.


Vern Miller

Vern Miller
Date: Between 1970 and 1974
A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.


William Eugene Stanley

William Eugene Stanley
Creator: Baldwin, Fred
Date: Between 1899 and 1903
These two cabinet cards show William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney from 1871 to 1872. A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney from 1874 to 1880. In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district from 1881 to 1883. Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas and was re-elected in 1901. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law.


William Eugene Stanley

William Eugene Stanley
Date: Between 1899 and 1903
This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.


William Foster Means

William Foster Means
Creator: Chase Studio, Hiawatha, KS
Date: Between 1894 and 1900
This cabinet card shows William Foster Means (1861-1930), a lawyer from Hiawatha, Kansas. Means, a native of DeKalb County, Missouri, graduated from the University of Missouri in 1885 with a degree in law and was admitted to the bar in 1887. He promptly moved to Horton, Kansas, in 1887 to practice civil law. Considered a conservative and thoroughly educated attorney by his peers, Means was elected county attorney of Brown County in the fall of 1890. Upon assuming the office he moved to Hiawatha, Kansas. Means was re-elected in 1894 and in 1900 respectively as county attorney. He did not seek re-election in 1904 but returned to private life. Actively involved in the community, Means held a number of elected and appointed positions from city attorney of Hiawatha to serving on the local school board. In addition to these positions, he was a member of the Republican party and one of the founders of the Citizen's Bank of Hiawatha. He also served as a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.


William L. Sayers in Hill City, Kansas

William L. Sayers in Hill City, Kansas
Date: Between 1915 and 1920
These two photographs show William L. Sayers, an attorney, in his office in Hill City, Kansas. Sayers was born around 1872 in Nebraska and moved to Hill City, Kansas, with his family in 1888. There at the age of 15 he earned a teaching certificate, however, he had to wait until he turned 16 to teach. After teaching school for several years, he became clerk of the court for Graham County. Sayers used his spare time to read law books. In 1893, he was admitted to the bar and took classes at the University of Kansas. Although he never graduated from law school, he was elected county attorney for Graham county in 1900, 1912, and 1914. His younger brother John followed him in this position in 1918. He was the second African American to be elected Graham County Attorney; the first was G. W. Jones who was elected in 1896. The Sayers brothers practiced law in Graham County for their entire careers.


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