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17th Annual Kansas State Fair

17th Annual Kansas State Fair
Creator: Hutchinson Gazette
Date: September 02, 1917
This is an advertisement for the 17th Annual Kansas State Fair published in the Hutchinson Gazette, September 2, 1917.


A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen
Creator: Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-
Date: December 11, 1919
Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.


Aaron Jackson, prisoner 9686

Aaron Jackson, prisoner 9686
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: March 14, 1901
This photograph shows inmate, Aaron Jackson, prisoner #9686. He was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on March 14, 1901 from Shawnee County, Kansas for larceny.


Aaron Zadik and Daul Mans, prisoners 9196 and 8443

Aaron Zadik and Daul Mans, prisoners 9196 and 8443
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 17, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, Aaron Zadik, prisoner #9196 and Daul Mans, prisoner #8443. Aaron Zadik was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on January 1, 1900 from Oklahoma for larceny and escaping prison. Inmate Daul Mans was received at the penitentiary on February 10, 1898 from Elk County, Kansas for rape.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 1, 1886
A.B. Campbell, Kansas Adjutant General, of Parsons, telegrams Kansas Governor John Martin, of Topeka, stating that another railroad engine has been killed and that he is leaving to investigate. This is in response to the local authority's request for National Guard troops during the railroad strike in the three state area.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 4, 1886
The Kansas adjutant general at Parsons sends a telegram to Governor John Martin of Topeka asking the governor for permission to furnish the mayor of Parsons with one hundred guns to preserve peace in the city. A strike of railroad workers on the Missouri Pacific Railroad at Parsons led company and city officials to ask the governor to arm citizens and for call out the militia.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 9, 1886
Adjutant General Colonel A. B. Campbell of Parsons, Kansas, writes Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka. He informs the governor that citizens are putting together a force of fifty special police to respond to striking railroad workers. Railroad employees at Parsons were striking and the governor granted permission to provide citizens with arms to keep the peace.


A. B. Long and James Simons, prisoners 9398 and 9066

A. B. Long and James Simons, prisoners 9398 and 9066
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: February 17, 1901
This photographs shows inmates A. B. Long, prisoner #9398, and James Simons, prisoner #9066. Both inmates were received at the Kansas State Penitentiary from Oklahoma for larceny.


Abolition of Capital Punishment - Effect on Crime

Abolition of Capital Punishment - Effect on Crime
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes correspondence asking for literature about the abolishment of capital punishment. In reply to the request from Oklahoma, the Governor's office states that Kansas abolished the use of capital punishment years prior to Governor Capper's administration. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


A.B. Treadwell and Phillip Searls, prisoners 6949 and 9065

A.B. Treadwell and Phillip Searls, prisoners 6949 and 9065
Creator: Kansas. Dept. of Corrections
Date: January 25, 1905
This photograph shows inmates A.B. Treadwell, prisoner #6949, and Phillip Searls, prisoner #9065. A.B. Treadwell was received at the Kansas State Penitentiary on May 14, 1894 from Lyon County, Kansas for burglary, escaping prison and larceny. Phillip Searls was received at the penitentiary on October 6, 1899 from Oklahoma for larceny. Varient spelling of his names includes Phillip Searls.


Abzuga (Zu)  Adams diary

Abzuga (Zu) Adams diary
Creator: Adams, Abzuga (Zu), 1859-1911
Date: 1908-1910
This is the fourth diary in Abzuga (Zu) Adams' papers from November 19, 1908 to October 9, 1910. It contains family, domestic and work news with several entries about building the Memorial building in Topeka, Kansas. Zu Adams was born in Atchison, Kansas, in 1859, and named after for her father's mother who also went by the nickname Zu. As a child, she lived in various Kansas towns including Waterville, Wichita, and Topeka. In 1876, when Zu was seventeen, her father became Secretary of the Kansas Historical Society where she worked as his unpaid assistant. Later she was given a salary and the title of librarian. At the time of her father's death in 1899, Zu and her late Father had hoped she would succeed him as secretary but when George Martin emerged as a candidate, Zu withdrew her candidacy. She worked as Martin's assistant until her death in 1911. From her experience as a secretary, the diary contains sections of short hand unique to Zu and are left to interpretation by the reader. Zu never married, remaining in the family home and raising her younger brothers and sisters and Helen who she adopted in 1896.


Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question

Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question
Creator: Wyandotte Gazette
Date: April 25, 1879
This article includes information about Exoduster relief efforts in both Topeka and Lawrence. In Topeka, the Kansas Freedmen's Aid Association had appealed to other counties, asking them to form local aid societies to assist refugees in their respective areas. Lawrence citizens held a meeting in Fraser Hall to discuss the Exodus; the attendees recognized the legitimacy of the Exodus and were willing to provide aid and support for the emigrants.


Adair building at the Osawatomie State Hospital, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair building at the Osawatomie State Hospital, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1925
A photograph of the Adair building at the Osawatomie State Hospital in Osawatomie, Kansas. The hospital was established by the State of Kansas in 1866 and had beds for 12 patients when it opened. By the end of the next year it housed 22 with applications for 50 more.


Addison Danford

Addison Danford
Creator: Jacoby,
Addison Danford was a free state supporter and served as a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. At the time, he lived in Linn County, Kansas Territory. Danford moved to Fort Scott, Bourbon County, and served as Adjutant General of Kansas after the Civil War.


Adjutant General

Adjutant General
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes correspondence relating to the Adjutant General. Included in the file is a list of proposed names to fill the positions of Brigadier General, President of the Military Board, Judge Advocate General, and Paymaster General in the Military Department. Also included is replies to letter by the Governor's office. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Adjutant General of Kansas to Governor Andrew Schoeppel

Adjutant General of Kansas to Governor Andrew Schoeppel
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Dept.
Date: Between 1943 and 1947
This memorandum, from the Adjutant General of Kansas to Governor Andrew Schoeppel, addresses the use of conscientious objectors on dairy farms. During World War II, thousands of men applied to the Selective Service as conscientious objectors to war based on their religious beliefs. Many, as this memo indicates, worked on farms during the war.


Adjutant General's report, Kansas Colored Volunteers correspondence

Adjutant General's report, Kansas Colored Volunteers correspondence
Creator: United States. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1863-1864
This bound letter book contains copies of letters sent and received by the Adjutant General's Office in Fort Scott, Kansas. They were assigned to recruit a regiment of colored soldiers. Letters were received from the War Department in Washington, D.C. and from the Office of the Governor in Kansas. The letters focus on the recruitment and commissioning of troops and officers for the Kansas Colored Volunteer's regiments. Many of the letters were written by or sent to General James G. Blunt. It appears the book was kept by Major T. J. Anderson, Assistant Adjutant General. Names of many individuals appear in the volume.


Administration building at the Kansas Women's Industrial Farm, Lansing, Kansas

Administration building at the Kansas Women's Industrial Farm, Lansing, Kansas
Date: 1936
This is a photograph of the administration building at the Kansas Women's Industrial Farm in Lansing, Kansas. In 1916, this facility was established, and, for a year, it was a branch of the men's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Leavenworth County. In 1917, it began operating as a separate, satellite unit. The Industrial Farm was under the supervision of the State Board of Administration before coming under the control of the Board of Penal Institutions, which was eventually reorganized as the Department of Corrections. It housed women who had committed crimes against the state. In 1980, the facility became co-correctional and the name was changed to the Kansas Correctional Institution at Lansing in 1983.


Administration building at the Larned State Hospital, Larned, Kansas

Administration building at the Larned State Hospital, Larned, Kansas
Creator: McAlister, Cecil
Date: Between 1960 and 1969
A photograph of the administration building at Larned State Hospital in Larned, Kansas.


Administration building at the Osawatomie State Hospital, Osawatomie, Kansas

Administration building at the Osawatomie State Hospital, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1940
A photograph showing the administration building at the Osawatomie State Hospital in Osawatomie, Kansas. The hospital was established by the State of Kansas in 1866 and had beds for 12 patients when it opened. By the end of the next year it housed 22 with applications for 50 more.


Administration building, Kansas State Penitentiary

Administration building, Kansas State Penitentiary
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This is a view of the administration building at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas.


Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the administration building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Adolph Fontroy and William Gentry, prisoners 9303 and 9498

Adolph Fontroy and William Gentry, prisoners 9303 and 9498
Creator: Kansas State Penitentiary
Date: January 25, 1901
This photograph shows inmates, Adolph Fantroy, prisoner #9303 and William Gentry, prisoner #9498. Variations of spelling for Adolph Fantroy includes Fontroy. William Gentry was received at Kansas State Penitentiary on October 25, 1900 from Labette County, Kansas for prostitution.


Adolph Fontroy and William Gentry, prisoners 9303 and 9498, Kansas State Penitentiary

Adolph Fontroy and William Gentry, prisoners 9303 and 9498, Kansas State Penitentiary
Creator: Kansas. Dept. of Corrections
Date: January 25, 1901
Glass plate negative of Adolf Fontroy and William Gentry, prisoners 9303 and 9498, of the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas.


Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence

Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: October 10, 1904-January 24, 1908
In this correspondence with George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Adolph Roenigk addresses issues related to the Pawnee Indians. In the letter dated October 10, 1904, Roenigk explains that "a Battle between the Potowatomie and the Pawnee Indians was fought here [Lincoln, Kansas] in 1863." According to Roenigk, between 14 and 16 Native Indians were killed during the fighting. Similarly, Roenigk's letter of October 24, 1906, concerns violence between Kansans and Native Indians during the late 1860s when a man named Solomon Humbarger and Solomon's brother were attacked by Native Indians. After killing one of their chiefs Roenigk states that Humbarger was shot in the thigh with an arrow.


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