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T. C. Davis family and house in Leavenworth, Kansas T. C. Davis family and house in Leavenworth, Kansas

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Government and Politics - State Government - Governors - Paulen, Benjamin Sanford

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A. H. Gufler to Governor Ben Paulen

A. H. Gufler to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: Gufler, A. H
Date: February 2, 1927
In this letter, A.H. Gufler expresses disappointment in the language of the new Kansas cigarette law and encloses a newspaper article by the associated press in which Governor Paulen is quoted.


A.H. Gufler to Representatives E.H. Rees and L.R. Cowden

A.H. Gufler to Representatives E.H. Rees and L.R. Cowden
Creator: Gufler, A. H
Date: March 3, 1927
A.H. Gufler, vice president of The Theo. Poehler Mercantile, writes to state representatives encouraging legalization of cigarettes in Kansas. The new cigarette law, H.B. 1 under consideration, was signed into law by Governor Paulen in 1927.


Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas

Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas
Date: August 1, 1928
This photograph shows Senator Arthur Capper, Kansas Governor Ben Paulin, Vice President Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray standing from left to right while visiting the Pawnee Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas on August 1, 1928. The men visited the Pawnee Capitol, commonly referred to as the First Territorial Capitol at Fort Riley, when Senator Capper was visiting Kansas. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor

Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor
Date: Between January 12, 1925 and January 14, 1929
This portrait shows the 23rd governor of Kansas, Ben S. Paulen from Fredonia, Kansas.


Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor

Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor
Date: 1915
This photograph represents Ben S. Paulen while in office serving as Kansas Senator for District 13.


Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor

Ben S. Paulen, Kansas Governor
Date: Unknown
This portrait represents Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen prior to being in office from 1925 to 1929. At the time the portrait was taken, Paulen was the Chairman of the State Board of Social Welfare.


Benjamin S. Paulen, Kansas Governor

Benjamin S. Paulen, Kansas Governor
Creator: Hill, F.W.
Date: March 17, 1927
This black and white photograph shows Kansas Governor Benjamin S. Paulen sitting at his desk in the governor's office to commemorate his signing of the Kindergarten bill. Individuals in the photograph are identified on the back of the photograph from left to right.


Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas

Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O.W.
Date: August 1, 1928
This sepia colored photograph shows Kansas Governor Benjamin S. Paulen shaking hands with members from the Osawatomie tribe at the dedication ceremony for the restoration of the state's first territorial capitol in Pawnee, Kansas. Standing in the middle watching the handshake is United States Senator from Kansas, Charles Curtis.


C. E. Booz to Governor Ben Paulen

C. E. Booz to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: Booz, C.E.
Date: January 22, 1927
In this letter, C. E. Booz, of the McPherson Hail Insurance Company, writes Kansas Governor Ben Paulen opposing legislation to repeal the Kansas Anti Cigarette law.


Governor Ben Paulen's residence, Fredonia, Wilson County, Kansas

Governor Ben Paulen's residence, Fredonia, Wilson County, Kansas
Date: 1961
These four photographs show the exterior of Governor Ben Paulen's residence in Fredonia, Wilson County, Kansas. Paulen was a banker who served as governor from January 1925 to January 1929. He died in Fredonia on July 11, 1961.


Governor Ben Paulen campaign correspondence

Governor Ben Paulen campaign correspondence
Creator: Peck, Dr. F. Jesse
Date: Between 1925 and 1929
Correspondence to Kansas Governor Ben Paulen regarding campaign matters.


Governor Ben S. Paulen, Western University correspondence

Governor Ben S. Paulen, Western University correspondence
Date: September 15, 1926-September 23, 1926
Correspondence between Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen, regarding Western University in Quindaro, Kansas.


Herbert Clark Hoover, Strong City, Kansas

Herbert Clark Hoover, Strong City, Kansas
Date: August 20, 1928
This sepia colored photograph shows Herbert Clark Hoover, Republican candidate for Presidency, with members of the Kansas Republican party campaigning in Strong City, Kansas. The campaign trip took Hoover from Dodge City to Topeka. Individuals captured in the photograph are identified on the reverse of the photograph.


John L. Frye to Governor Ben Paulen

John L. Frye to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: Frye, John
Date: January 20, 1927
John Frye writes to Governor Paulen with his concerns about repeal of the Kansas anti-cigarette law.


Kansas Senate 1925

Kansas Senate 1925
Creator: Boeger, Topeka
Date: 1925
This photograph represents members of the 1925 Kansas Senate Legislature with their names listed below their portrait. In the center is Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen who held office from 1925 to 1929.


Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union permanent records

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union permanent records
Date: 1910-1939
These permanent records of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union include the records of the treasurer, contracts concerning publications, sworn statements of elected trustees, correspondence with potential speakers, candidate information relating to prohibition laws in Kansas, and meeting minutes. There is also correspondence concerning the Kellogg-Briand Pact, an international peace agreement signed in 1928. One letter clearly disapproves of Maude Royden, an English suffragist, from fulfilling her presentation for the Y.W.C.A on account of her tobacco use. A copy of the charter of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Kansas, signed by Secretary of State Frank J. Ryan is also included. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.


Ku Klux Klan bill

Ku Klux Klan bill
Creator: Johnson, Douglas
Date: 1925
Kansas state senator Douglas Johnson introduced Senate Bill No. 269 which was known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. By amending sections 17-501 and 17-503 of a 1923 revised Kansas statute, the bill would have allowed any foreign, charitable, or religious group to operate in Kansas without a state charter. Many Kansans opposed the bill on the grounds that it would have made it easier for the KKK to operate in the state. Governor Paulen opposed the bill and the house defeated its passing with 57 yes and 65 no. During the 1920s the Ku Klux Klan grew in numbers nationwide and enjoyed immense popularity.


National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Governor Ben Paulen

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
Date: March 13, 1925
The Kansas branch of the NAACP in Kansas City wrote this letter to Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen in Topeka. The NAACP thanked Governor Paulen for not passing Senate Bill 269 known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. If passed, this bill would have allowed organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan to operate in Kansas without taking out a charter. Governor Paulen disagreed with the bill and discouraged its passing. The bill failed in the Kansas House of Representatives with 65 nays and 57 yeas.


Senator S. F. Paul to Governor Ben S. Paulen

Senator S. F. Paul to Governor Ben S. Paulen
Creator: Paul, S. F.
Date: December 16, 1924
A letter from Senator S. F. Paul to Kansas Governor Ben Paulen, regarding inspection charges and weighing charges of the State Grain Department.


W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission

W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission
Creator: Branham, W. R.
Date: March 20, 1925
Oxford, Georgia resident, W. R. Branham, writes the Kansas State Prison Commission of Topeka (Shawnee County) for information on the effect the abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Kansas abolished its first capital punishment law in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until the 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynching) occurred in the state during that period. See William Eaton Hutchison to W. R. Branham, March 23, 1925.


William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham

William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham
Creator: Hutchison, William Easton, b. 1860
Date: March 23, 1925
Pardon Attorney Wm. Easton Hutchison of Topeka (Shawnee County) replies to Oxford, Georgia, resident W. R. Branham concerning the effect the state's abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Hutchison responds that he has no data on the subject and cannot tell whether there has been an increase or decrease in murder rates since the abolition in 1907. Hutchison considers the change in the law a change in name only since previous governors refused to carry out the execution order, he explains, making the original law ineffectual. Kansas abolished capital punishment in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynchings) occurred in the state during that period. See W. R. Branham to Kansas State Prison Commission, March 20, 1925.


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