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Environment - Geology - Flint Hills

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Showing 1 - 15 of 15 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Biface from 14HV302

Biface from 14HV302
Date: Unknown
This biface was recovered from the surface of an archeological site in Harvey County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. It is made of local Florence chert from the Flint Hills.


Cattle in Flint Hills

Cattle in Flint Hills
Creator: Richards, Don
Date: Between 1960 and 1970
Cattle in Flint Hills.


Dart Points from 14DP407

Dart Points from 14DP407
Date: Unknown
These two dart points were collected from an Archaic period archeological site in Doniphan County and donated in 2018 to the Kansas Historical Society. The projectile points are made of Florence chert, which outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma. After knapping, dart points would be mounted to the dart foreshaft, which would in turn be connected to the dart shaft. The assembled dart would then be thrown with an atlatl (spearthrower).


Flint Hills, Kansas

Flint Hills, Kansas
Creator: Ketchum, Berne
Date: Between January 1, 1985 and January 12, 1985
The colored slide shows a view of the Flint Hills Region. This natural prairie grassland runs north and south through east-central Kansas. It is one of the largest areas of native grasslands left in the United States.


Flint Hills, Kansas

Flint Hills, Kansas
Creator: Ketchum, Berne
Date: 1985
This colored slide shows the Flint Hills. This natural prairie grassland runs north and south through east-central Kansas. It is one of the largest areas of native grasslands left in the United States.


Flint Hills, Kansas

Flint Hills, Kansas
Creator: Ketchum, Berne
Date: 1985
This colored slide show the Flint Hills. This natural prairie grassland runs north and south through east-central Kansas. It is one of the largest areas of native grasslands left in the United States.


Flint Hills, Kansas

Flint Hills, Kansas
Creator: Ketchum, Berne
Date: 1985
This colored slide shows an aerial view of the Flint Hills Region. This natural prairie grassland runs north and south through east-central Kansas. It is one of the largest areas of native grasslands left in the United States.


Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject old west towns - prairie

Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject old west towns - prairie
Creator: Kansas Film Commission
Date: 1980s-2000s
These are panoramic photographs of locations in Kansas created by the Kansas Film Commission to promote scenes to film companies. The panoramics were created by taking individual photos and taping them together. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by subject and then location. Subjects included in this part of the collection are old west towns, parks, people, and prairie.


Kansas Flint Hills

Kansas Flint Hills
View of an unknown location in the Kansas Flint Hills. This image was transferred from the William H. Avery Manuscript Collection #137, General Files, Interior, Department of Proposed True Prairie National Park.


Large Biface from the Thompson Gardens Site, 14CO1509

Large Biface from the Thompson Gardens Site, 14CO1509
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This biface was recovered from the Thompson Gardens site in Cowley County. A biface could have been used as a cutting tool or, with more work, turned into specific tools. It is made of local Florence chert from the Flint Hills region. It weighs over 2.5 pounds and is 10.25" long and 4.25" wide. The site was a large Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated there during a salvage archeological investigation in 1995.


Projectile Points from the Avoca Site, 14JN332

Projectile Points from the Avoca Site, 14JN332
Date: 500-1000 CE
These projectile points were recovered from the Avoca site in Jackson County, a Grasshopper Falls phase site occupied during the Early Ceramic period. The two corner-notched dart points on the top row are made of local chert from the Flint Hills region. Dart points would be mounted to the dart foreshaft, which would in turn be connected to the dart shaft. The assembled dart would then be thrown with an atlatl (spearthrower). The three Scallorn arrow points on the bottom row are also made of local chert. Scallorn points are small corner notched or expanding stem arrow points with barbed shoulders. Bows and arrows appear during the Early Ceramic Period and were in use into the 1800s. Grasshopper Falls phase occupations characteristically have both dart and arrow points.


Projectile Points from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1

Projectile Points from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1
Date: 1400-1750 CE
These arrow points were recovered from the Larcom-Haggard site in Cowley County. All are made of Permian chert from the Flint Hills region and they get their pinkish color as a result of the material being carefully heated before manufacturing to improve the chert's knapping qualities. Though small and thin, the side-notched and triangular arrow points would have been extremely effective on the hunt. The Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village was discovered in an old river meander with a modern gravel quarry greatly impacting the site. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated there in 1996 as the final stage of a salvage project.


Quail, Flint Hills, Kansas

Quail, Flint Hills, Kansas
Creator: Ketchum, Berne
Date: 1985
This colored slide shows a view of a quail standing at the base of a small tree or bush in the Flint Hills region. The Flint Hills is a natural prairie grassland region which runs north and south through east-central Kansas. It is one of the largest areas of native grasslands left in the United States.


Stemmed Arrow Point from the Radio Lane Site, 14CO385

Stemmed Arrow Point from the Radio Lane Site, 14CO385
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This arrow point was recovered at the Radio Lane site, a large Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in Cowley County. The point has a parallel stemmed base and is made of local Florence chert from the Flint Hills region. The point gets its pinkish color as a result of the material being carefully heated before manufacturing to improve the chert's knapping qualities. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated at the site in 1995.


The Tuttle Creek story

The Tuttle Creek story
Creator: Blue Valley Film Committee
Date: Between 1954 and 1956
The people of the Blue River Valley in Kansas produced this short film as part of their campaign against the construction of a dam and reservoir on the Big Blue River in the Flint Hills of Northeast Kansas, north of Manhattan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers proposed a series of flood control projects in the Missouri River basin beginning in the late 1930s. The Pick-Sloan plan authorized by Congress in the Flood Control Act of 1944 called for a series of large dams and levees on rivers in the basin. The film argues that the large flood control measures proposed by the Corps of Engineers are unnecessary and ineffectual and flood prevention methods through small retention dams in individual watersheds are less invasive and more effective. Despite heavy local opposition, construction of the Tuttle Creek dam began in 1952 and it became fully operational by July 1962. The dam displaced 3000 people and ten towns including Stockdale, Randolph, Winkler, Cleburne, Irving, Blue Rapids, Shroyer, Garrison, Barrett, and Bigelow.


Showing 1 - 15

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