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Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway parade in Topeka, Kansas Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway parade in Topeka, Kansas

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A. J. Dyck to Arthur Capper

A. J. Dyck to Arthur Capper
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: April 23, 1918
Reverend A. J. Dyck of the Hoffnungsau Mennonite Church, Inman, Kansas, wrote this letter to Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, Kansas, concerning the Third Liberty Loan drive and its impact on the German American community. Dyck explains that the members of his church have bought more than the amount of Liberty Loans required by the established quota in order to prove their loyalty and avoid harassment by "mobs." In addition, Dyck asks Capper if it would be acceptable for members of his church to donate to the Red Cross rather than providing money to support the war effort.


Abram and John Pratt, with two little boys, Studley Home Guard, Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas

Abram and John Pratt, with two little boys, Studley Home Guard, Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas
Date: 1917
Abram Pratt, sitting, and John Pratt with two little boys at the home of Tom Pratt, Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas in 1917. The Pratt men are in their Studley Home Guard uniforms. Cottonwood Ranch was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.


Aged German is given 48 hours to leave city!

Aged German is given 48 hours to leave city!
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: February 19, 1918
This article published in the Topeka Journal covers the story of Daniel Klege. Klege, a 75 year old resident of Topeka, Kansas, and veteran of the Civil War, was ordered to leave Topeka until the end of the war with Germany because he had never registered to become a naturalized U.S. citizen.


Albert Nelson, World War I soldier

Albert Nelson, World War I soldier
Creator: Nelson, Albert
Date: 1918-1919
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Albert Nelson, 353rd Infantry, Machine Gun Company, 89th Division.


Alien registration card for Vena Peters Schock

Alien registration card for Vena Peters Schock
Date: July 25, 1918
This Alien registration Card, issued by the U.S. Department of Justice to Vena Peters Schock of Topeka, KS, was issued during World War I due to Schock's status as a non-naturalized citizen of the United States. During World War I many German Americans were issued similar registration cards that they had to carry at all times. If a non-naturalized German American was stopped without their card, they could face imprisonment until hostilities between Germany and the United States ceased.


All alien enemies liable to arrest

All alien enemies liable to arrest
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: June 19, 1917
This article, published in the June 19, 1917, edition of the Topeka Capital addresses the law prohibiting German immigrants who were not naturalized U.S. citizens from entering the Topeka Business District without a special permit from the U.S. Marshall Office. Anyone violating the law could be placed in jail without trial until the end of the war.


Are You With or Against the Hun?

Are You With or Against the Hun?
Creator: Canton Pilot
Date: April 25, 1918
This article, published in the April 25, 1918, edition of the Canton Pilot, encourages readers to buy Liberty Bonds in order to "show the world where you stand."


Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, Chanute, Kansas

Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, Chanute, Kansas
Date: 1918
This photograph taken during Armistance Day on November 11, 1918 in Chanute, Kansas, celebrates the end of World War I across the globe. In the photograph, a car is driving pulling a coffin with the word "Kaiser" written on the side to represent the death of the German Kaiser.


Bank president is removed for unloyal conduct

Bank president is removed for unloyal conduct
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: June 5, 1918
This article, published in the June 5, 1918, edition of the Topeka Capital, details the removal of Wamego State Bank president and director Loius B. Leach due to "slackerism." Specifically, Leach refused to buy Liberty Loans, would not donate to the Red Cross, and encouraged his son-in-law to evade the draft. In adddition to his removal, Leach was the target of mobs who painted his vehicle yellow and demanded that he fly the America flag.


Boys dressed as soldiers, Syracuse, Hamilton County, Kansas

Boys dressed as soldiers, Syracuse, Hamilton County, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1918
This photograph shows two adults and seven boys dressed as soldiers in Syracuse, Hamilton County, Kansas.


Buy liberty bonds or see U.S. lose

Buy liberty bonds or see U.S. lose
Creator: Canton Pilot
Date: May 2, 1918
This article, published in the Canton Pilot, strongly encourages readers to buy Liberty Bonds in order to win the war against Germany.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows a mess hall at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Baird Company Engravers
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two photographs show the mess hall and kitchen at Remount Station at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two interior views show the barracks at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The barracks were two-story wooden structures erected upon cement foundations with the capacity to house 200 to 250 men. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These five black and white photographs show construction at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell Photo
Date: 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows the nurses' home at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These four panoramic views show Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: 1917
These five black and white photographs show construction at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: August 29, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: September 19, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: July 25, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built as the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


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