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Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas

Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Galey, Thomas
Date: July 17, 1930
These two photographs show the Charles Hadsell house, as well as the location of John Brown's fort, located near the Marais des Cygnes massacre site in Linn County, Kansas. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire on them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years, Hadsall built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941, the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961, it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963, the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. Today the park is operated as the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site.


Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas

Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1960 and 1965
These two photographs show the Charles Hadsall house after renovation. The house is located on the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men, and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire on them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years, Hadsall built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941, the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961, it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963, the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. The Maraid des Cygnes Massacre site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas

Charles Hadsall house at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas
Date: 1963-1965
Multiple views of the Charles Hadsall house after renovation. This house is located on the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men, and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. In 1941 the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961 it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963 the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964.The Marais des Cygnes Massacre site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Charles Hadsell house near John Brown's fort, Linn County, Kansas

Charles Hadsell house near John Brown's fort, Linn County, Kansas
Date: 1911
This is a photograph of the Charles Hadsell house that was built near John Brown's fort, close to the Marais des Cygnes massacre site. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamilton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, where they captured 11 free-state men. The Missourians marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June 1858, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years Hadsall built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941 the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961 it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and, in 1963, the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. Today the park is operated as Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Dedication of historical marker at Trading Post cemetery, Linn County, Kansas

Dedication of historical marker at Trading Post cemetery, Linn County, Kansas
Date: October 09, 1941
A photograph showing the dedication of a historical marker at Trading Post cemetery in Linn County, Kansas. Near Trading Post is the site of the Marais de Cygne Massacre, which occurred on May 19, 1858. A memorial to those killed and wounded in the massacre is located at the Trading Post Cemetery. The Marais des Cygnes Massacres site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Display at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas

Display at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1965 and 1975
A black and white photograph of a display at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site in Linn County, Kansas. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men before marching them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years Hadsall, built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941, the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961, it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963, the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964.


Fortified cabin built by John Brown, Linn County, Kansas

Fortified cabin built by John Brown, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1970
This is an artist's rendering of a fortified cabin built by John Brown at the site of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. On May 19, 1858, proslavery supporters killed five and wounded five free-state supporters in a ravine near Trading Post, Kansas in Linn County. The massacre, which followed earlier guerrilla warfare activities on both sides, shocked the nation and became a pivotal event in the "Bleeding Kansas" era. In late June 1858, abolitionist John Brown constructed a fortified cabin, illustrated here, at the site of the massacre. The fort was reported to have been two stories high, walled up with logs and with a flat roof. Water from a spring ran through the house and into a pit at the southwest corner. Although the fort no longer stands, the site is listed as a National Historic Landmark administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Governor Payne Ratner at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre site, Linn County, Kansas

Governor Payne Ratner at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre site, Linn County, Kansas
Date: December 16, 1939
This photograph shows Governor Payne H. Ratner speaking at the Marais des Cynges Massacre site in Linn County, Kansas. The site commemorates the killing of 11 free-state men by Missouri border ruffians on May 19, 1858. In 1941, the Kansas Legislature took ownership of the site, and in 1963 the Kansas Historical Society took final control establishing a museum and maintaining the site and buildings as a State Historic Site.


Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject old west towns - prairie

Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject old west towns - prairie
Creator: Kansas Film Commission
Date: 1980s-2000s
These are panoramic photographs of locations in Kansas created by the Kansas Film Commission to promote scenes to film companies. The panoramics were created by taking individual photos and taping them together. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by subject and then location. Subjects included in this part of the collection are old west towns, parks, people, and prairie.


Lone Tree marking the site of the Marais de Cygnes massacre

Lone Tree marking the site of the Marais de Cygnes massacre
Date: Between 1880 and 1920
Several images of the Lone Elm tree marking the site of the Marais des Cygnes massacre in Linn County, Kansas. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men, and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. In 1941 the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961 it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963 the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. Today the park is operated as Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre historical marker at the cemetery, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre historical marker at the cemetery, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1956
A photograph showing a historical marker at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre cemetery, Linn County, Kansas. The marker was erected by the Kansas State Historical Society and the Kansas Department of Transportation. The Marais des Cygnes Massacre site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre park, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre park, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Harvey, John
Date: Between 1970 and 1976
This photograph shows Reese Hamilton standing by a stone marker and pointing to the ravine where free-state men were shot by Missourians at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre Park, Linn County, Kansas. The site is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre park, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre park, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society. Library and Archives Division
Date: 1965
A photograph showing the ravine at Marais des Cygnes Massacre Park where five free-state men were killed by Missourians on May 19,1858, Linn County, Kansas. The park is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre park and marker, Linn County

Marais des Cygnes Massacre park and marker, Linn County
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society. Library and Archives Division
Date: 1965
A photograph showing Marais des Cygnes Massacre park and site marker, Linn County, Kansas. At this location, five free-state men were killed by Missourians on May 19, 1858. The park is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Harvey, John
Date: Between 1970 and 1976
A photograph showing Reese Hamilton posed with a stone marker at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre Park, Linn County, Kansas. The marker was placed at the location where free-state men were lined up and shot by Missourians. The site is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Harvey, John
Date: Between 1970 and 1976
A photograph showing Reese Hamilton posed with a stone marker at the Marais des Cygne Massacre Park, Linn County, Kansas. The marker was placed at the location where free-state men were lined up and shot by Missourians. The site is owned by the State if Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Harvey, John
Date: Between 1970 and 1976
A photograph showing Reese Hamilton posed with a stone marker at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre Park, Linn County, Kansas. The marker was placed at the location where free-state men were lined up and shot by Missourians. The site is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas

Marais des Cygnes Massacre stone marker, Linn County, Kansas
Creator: Harvey, John
Date: Between 1970 and 1976
A photograph showing Reese Hamilton posed with a stone marker at the Marais des Cygnes Massacre Park, Linn County, Kansas. The marker was placed at the location where free-state men were lined up and shot by Missourians. The site is owned by the State of Kansas and operated by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Phebe Weeks Cummings letters from Linn County, Kansas

Phebe Weeks Cummings letters from Linn County, Kansas
Date: 1857-1861
Several letters from Phebe Weeks Cummings to her sister, Elizabeth Weeks Simmonds. Phebe's letters are sporadic from 1857 to 1861, and all written from Linn County, Kansas. Phebe and her husband Josiah, moved to Kansas Territory in 1857 where Linn County would later be organized. In 1863, they left Kansas, tired of the incursions into Kansas by Missouri "ruffians." They migrated on the Oregon Trail to Walla Walla, Washington Territory where they lived for the remainder of their lives. Phebe died in 1878 and Josiah in 1874. The letters range from family talk, settlement of the area, and of great interest, describing what is believed to the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Missouri border ruffians led a raid into Linn County, Kansas to steal goods and harass freestaters. On May 19, 1858, some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, captured 11 free-state men, and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. Other Weeks' letters can be found on Kansas Memory at Unit ID's: 457224, 457225, 457227, 457228 and 457229.


Reproduction of John Brown's fort in Linn County, Kansas

Reproduction of John Brown's fort in Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1860 and 1890
This photograph shows a reproduction of John Brown's fort at the site of the Marais des Cygnes massacre in Linn County, Kansas. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamilton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men. The Missourians marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June 1858, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years Hadsall built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941 the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961 it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963 the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. Today the park is operated as Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site.


Views of the stone house on the site of John Brown's fort, Linn County, Kansas

Views of the stone house on the site of John Brown's fort, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1930 and 1939
Several views of the stone house built on the site of John Brown's fort, near the Marais des Cygnes massacre. On May 19, 1858, Missouri border ruffian Charles Hamelton and some 30 other men rode through the village of Trading Post, Kansas, and captured 11 free-state men, and marched them into a ravine where they opened fire upon them. Five of the men were killed, five were seriously injured, and one escaped unharmed. John Brown, arriving at the scene toward the end of June, built a "fort" some 220 yards south of the ravine. The land on which the fort was built belonged to Eli Snider, a blacksmith. Later he sold it to Brown's friend Charles C. Hadsall, who agreed to let Brown occupy it for military purposes. Brown and his men withdrew at the end of the summer, leaving the fort to Hadsall. In later years Hadsall built a stone house adjoining the site of Brown's fort, enclosing the spring within the walls of the first floor. In 1941 the Kansas legislature authorized acceptance of the massacre site, including Hadsall's house, as a gift to the state from the Pleasanton Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars. In 1961 it provided funds for the restoration of the building, and in 1963 the entire property was turned over to the Kansas Historical Society for administration. A museum was established in the upper floor of the building in 1964. Today the park is operated as Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site.


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