Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

George Henry family, Stanton County, Kansas George Henry family, Stanton County, Kansas

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 731,863
Bookbag items: 37,992
Registered users: 11,655

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 25

Category Filters

Places - Historic sites - El Quartelejo

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 25 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three of the many side notched arrow points that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These arrow points were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The notches aided in hafting the point to the arrow shaft.


Awls from the El Cuartelejo Site, 14SC1

Awls from the El Cuartelejo Site, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three of the many bone awls that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These awls were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. Awls were usually made from deer bone and used as a perforating tool in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing. The awl on the left was made from a whitetail deer ulna and the awl in the center from a deer metapodial. The awl on the right was made from a rib, which, when the tip broke was never used again.


Biface from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Biface from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This biface was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. This biface was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. A biface, like this one, could have been used as a cutting tool or, with more work, turned into a specific tool.


Biface from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Biface from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown is a large biface recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The biface may have been stored for future use (what Archeologists call a cache), been meant for trade, or had some other significance we today do not know.


Bone Ornament from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Bone Ornament from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown is a bone ornament that was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. This artifact was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The bone ornament has cut marks visible on each end. It was made from a medium sized animal.


Bone Ornaments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Bone Ornaments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are five bone ornaments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. They were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The bones are from a small animal, such as a rabbit. They may have been used as ornaments or intended to be bead blanks. Some of the ends are scored, as though in preparation for snapping off a bead.


Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This ceramic pipe fragment was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The pipe was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The fragment possibly represents a mouthpiece for a pipe or a fragment of a tubular style pipe called a "cloud blower."


Dismal River Vessel from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Dismal River Vessel from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1575-1625 CE
This Dismal River pottery vessel was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The micaeous (mica in the clay) pot was reconstructed from many individual sherds, with the spaces filled in with plaster. It stands 16 cm high. The El Cuartelejo site is the only known Plains Apache Pueblo in the Kansas and is further east than any other Pueblo.


Dismal River Vessel from El Cuarteljo, 14SC1

Dismal River Vessel from El Cuarteljo, 14SC1
Date: 1675-1725 CE
This Dismal River pottery vessel was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The micaeous (mica in clay) pot was reconstructed from many individual sherds, with the spaces filled in with plaster. The El Cuartelejo site is the only known Plains Apache Pueblo in the Kansas and is further east than any other Pueblo.


Drilled Bone Ornament from  El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Drilled Bone Ornament from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This thin modified bone was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. This artifact, possibly an ornament, was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Drills from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Drills from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are ten of the drills that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These drills were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Drills were used to bore holes in softer material than the drill itself, such as hides, shell, wood, or soft stone. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Early Excavations at El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Early Excavations at El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1898-1939
Shown are views of early excavations at El Cuartelejo site in Scott County including a view of the 1898 excavation by Williston and Martin of the University of Kansas, a grinding bin inside the pueblo, and the 1939 Smithsonian Institute camp (right center) during their excavations at the site. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


El Quartelejo Monument Scott County, Kansas

El Quartelejo Monument Scott County, Kansas
Creator: Walker, Russell W.
Date: February 28, 1948
This black and white photograph shows a view of the El Quartelejo Monument in Scott City, Kansas. This site located north of Scott City, Kansas and along Ladder Creek inside the Lake Scott State Park, is the archeological remains of a Indian pueblo. A group of Taos Indians migrated to the region from New Mexico around 1664 to escape Spanish oppression and to live among the Plains Apache Indians. To honor this historical area, a granite marker was erected in 1925 by the Kansas Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. In 1964, the ruins were recognized as a National Historic Landmark. The ruins are deteriorating and are considered a "at risk" site.


Excavations at El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Excavations at El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1975-1976
These four views are of the excavations at El Cuartelejo in Scott County. These photographs were taken during the 1975 and 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools. Shown are Kansas Historical Society archeologists and volunteers excavating in 1976, mapping in 1975, an excavated hearth in Room 7 in 1975, and the exposed pueblo in 1975. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Incised Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Incised Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three of the many ceramic pipe fragments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The pipes have been incised, before the they were fired, with horizontal and vertical incised lines. Two of the pipes retain traces of dottle (tobacco residue) within the bowls. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These pipe fragments were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program.


Obsidian Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Obsidian Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are two obsidian arrow points that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These arrow points were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. There is no natural source of obsidian in Scott County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache).


Pipe Bowl Fragments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Pipe Bowl Fragments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
These two pipe bowl fragments were recovered from the El Cuartelejo during the 1970 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Both pipe bowl fragments show polish on the exterior. They do not appear to have been smoked. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Pipestone Pipe Fragments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Pipestone Pipe Fragments from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three of the many pipe fragments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. All three fragments were made of pipestone. The soft fine grain material enabled the carver to shape and smooth the pieces and incise lines around two of the bowls. The artifacts were recovered during the 1970 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Polished Ceramic Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Polished Ceramic Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are four pipe fragments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These artifacts were recovered during the 1970 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The pipe stem and bowl fragments show no traces of having been smoked. The exterior has been polished or burnished. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Scapula Hoe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Scapula Hoe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This bison scapula hoe fragment was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County during the 1970 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Before the hoe broke, the hoe's maker removed the long spine that runs the length of the scapula (shoulder blade), beveled and sharpened the edge, and hafted it to a handle. The drilled hole was likely added after it broke, either as a lace hole for repair or for repurposing as an ornament. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Scrapers from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Scrapers from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are 11 scrapers that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The scrapers were made of a variety of cherts including Smoky Hill silicified chalk from western Kansas and Alibates agatized dolomite from the Canadian River valley in Texas. The scrapers may have been hafted onto a handle and used to scrape hides. They would have required periodic resharpening. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These scrapers were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school.


Side-Notched Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Side-Notched Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
These three side-notched arrow points were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These arrow points were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The notches on the arrow points aided in hafting the point to the arrow shaft. All three points were made of a type of chert called Smoky Hill silicified chalk. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Southwestern Pottery from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Southwestern Pottery from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
These seven pottery sherds were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The pottery sherds were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. All are decorated on both the exterior and interior. They resemble pottery from Pueblo sites and may have arrived as whole vessels, either brought or traded into El Cuartelejo. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Southwestern Style Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Southwestern Style Pipes from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are two pipe fragments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These pipes were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. Both pipes appear to have been burnished (polished) on the exterior. The smaller has incised vertical lines around the rim. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Triangular Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Triangular Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three triangular arrow points that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These arrow points were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Archeologists identify unnotched arrow points with a triangular shape as Fresno points. Though small and thin, they would have been extremely effective on the hunt. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898.


Showing 1 - 25

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.