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John McCannon to James B. Abbott

John McCannon to James B. Abbott
Creator: McCannon, John
Date: July 24, 1858
John McCannon, who had once served as Quartermaster for the Kansas free state militia, wrote from Little Osage, Kansas Territory, to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas. McCannon reported that peace reigned in the area in the wake of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre of the past May. Referring to the current Constitutional controversy, he proclaimed, "Lecompton can not live on the Osage," as there were not enough proslavery supporters in the area to approve it were it put to a popular vote. McCannon did not seem to be concerned that U.S. troops had recently arrived at Fort Scott, for reasons unknown to him, as local towns thrived and crops flourished.


Territorial Census, 1855, District 5

Territorial Census, 1855, District 5
Creator: Barbee, William
Date: January-March 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There was an index and summary at the end of the census enumeration. For District 5, the place of election was the house of Hy. Sherman, on the old John Jones improvement, on Pottawatomie Creek. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Fifth District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, at the southern boundary of the Fourth District; thence east along the same to the northwest corner of the Sac and Fox Reservation; thence due south along the western line thereof and due south to the south branch of the Neosho River, about seventy miles above the Catholic Osage Mission; thence down the said river to the north line of the reserve for New York Indians, and east along said line to the head waters of Little Osage River, or the nearest point thereto; and thence down said river to the Missouri State line, and up said line to the place of beginning."


Territorial Census, 1855, District 6

Territorial Census, 1855, District 6
Creator: Barbee, William
Date: January-February, 1855
This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There was a summary of voters in the 6th district at the end of the enumeration. For District Six, the place of election was the house of H. T. Wilson, at Fort Scott. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Sixth District follows: "Commencing on the Missouri State line, in Little Osage River; thence up the same to the line of the reserve of the New York Indians, or to the nearest point thereto; thence to and by the north line of said reserve to the Neosho River, and up said southern line of the Territory; thence by the southern and eastern lines of said Territory to the place of beginning."


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