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Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence

Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: October 10, 1904-January 24, 1908
In this correspondence with George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Adolph Roenigk addresses issues related to the Pawnee Indians. In the letter dated October 10, 1904, Roenigk explains that "a Battle between the Potowatomie and the Pawnee Indians was fought here [Lincoln, Kansas] in 1863." According to Roenigk, between 14 and 16 Native Indians were killed during the fighting. Similarly, Roenigk's letter of October 24, 1906, concerns violence between Kansans and Native Indians during the late 1860s when a man named Solomon Humbarger and Solomon's brother were attacked by Native Indians. After killing one of their chiefs Roenigk states that Humbarger was shot in the thigh with an arrow.


J.R. Mead to George W. Martin

J.R. Mead to George W. Martin
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: October 13, 1908
In this letter to George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, J.R. Mead of Wichita, Kansas, discusses the events surrounding the Treaty of Little Arkansas.


J.R. Mead to George W. Martin

J.R. Mead to George W. Martin
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: May 18, 1903
In this item, J.R. Mead of Wichita, Kansas, describes a Native American shield that he once owned. Written in response to a query from George W. Martin, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Mead's letter describes how the shield was decorated, as well as the materials used in its construction.


James Mead to his father

James Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: December 1, 1860
James Mead, a rancher and trader from Saline County, Kansas Territory, writes this letter to his father, who lived in Davenport, Iowa. Mead and his companions are going to "the river" to send a load of buffalo meat and buffalo robes to the folks back home. He also mentions a trading excursion he has taken recently to a Kaw Indian camp about twenty miles from his trading post, listing the goods that were traded. Although other settlers were suffering during the drought of 1860, Mead and those in the vicinity are faring quite well. He once again mentioned Lincoln's election and inquired about whether or not "the Union is dissolved." The letter dated November 22, 1860, which is also on page 1 of this item is described as item #90625. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James Mead to his father

James Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: January 11, 1861
In this letter, James R. Mead writes to his father concerning his buffalo hunting and trading. He has just returned from a trading trip. He does not know what to do with all of the robes, so he plans to send them to his father. He includes some advice about the best way to care for and sell these robes. He is hoping to come home to Davenport, Iowa, for a visit in the spring, but only if the fur prices were on the rise. In a few days he is heading north to get more furs. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James Mead to his father

James Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: February 14, 1861
James R. Mead writes this letter from his ranch and trading post near the Saline River to his father in Davenport, Iowa. He vehemently declares that the stories about suffering settlers in Kansas Territory were "bare-faced lies." He wishes that those in the East would stop sending relief supplies because "it all goes into the hands of favorites" and Kansas would be better off without it. He also provides his father advice, telling him to appreciate his home in Iowa and to stay out of the way of any enemies. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James Mead to his father

James Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: November 22, 1860
James Mead writes from Salina, Kansas Territory to his father who lived in Davenport, Iowa. Apparently, Mead has heard news of Lincoln's election, but he does not know any specifics. The main focus of the letter is Mead's experiences buffalo hunting--he intends to send his father some of the meat. Between September 1 and the date of this letter (November 22, 1860), he had shot 355 buffalo and killed 250 wolves. He has saved 250 buffalo hides and plans to sell them in St. Louis, Missouri. Also contained on this sheet is the first page of a letter dated December 1, 1860. This second letter is item 90626. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James R. Mead to his father

James R. Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: December 25, 1859
In this letter, Mead informs his father, who still lived in Davenport, Iowa, that he has established a trading post along the Saline River in Kansas Territory in order to trade with the Indians. Mead, along with his business partners, has stored up meat for the winter and has built a comfortable house. Apparently, times were still very difficult in Kansas, although Mead seems to have fared quite well. The letter ends with personal advice to his father about a mare who was no longer worth keeping. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James R. Mead to his father

James R. Mead to his father
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: August 13, 1859
In this letter, James Mead writes from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, to his father about his efforts to secure a claim. He includes information about the people of the territory, the beautiful vegetation, and the flourishing towns. Mead also writes of the immense amount of traffic along the Santa Fe Trail and of the roads to Lecompton and Topeka, which he declares are "the best roads I ever saw anywhere." In addition, he describes the buildings of Burlingame, Kansas Territory, and the make up of the community. At the end of the letter, he mentions the new constitution, which "is all Free State." These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James R. Mead to his father and others

James R. Mead to his father and others
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: November 7, 1859
In this letter, James R. Mead describes his first buffalo hunt to his family and friends. He had recently returned from this adventure and apparently he was extremely successful, having killed thirty buffalo. He provides a rather detailed description of a buffalo's appearance so his friends and family would have a mental picture of this magnificent animal. Mead also mentions other wild animals, such as prairie dogs and rabbits, commenting on their plumpness. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James R. Mead to his mother

James R. Mead to his mother
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: December 25, 1860
In this letter addressed to his mother, James Mead writes about his life on the frontier near the Saline River, Kansas Territory. He assures her that he has plenty of groceries, including sugar, meal, flour, beans and apples, as well as coffee and tea. He also informs her that he has sent the family a load of buffalo meat and robes, and he discusses the local fur trade, listing different animals in the area. Mead briefly describes his long term plans, stating that he would ultimately like to go into stock raising. Throughout the letter, he emphasizes the flourishing trade going on in Kansas, in one instance writing that "everybody trades." These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


James R. Mead to his sister

James R. Mead to his sister
Creator: Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836
Date: December 25, 1859
James R. Mead writes this letter from his home "somewhere in the West." He has a trading post about twenty miles north of the Saline River and west of Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. He describes in detail the abundance of wildlife, calling western Kansas the "Land of Plenty." Mead and his business partners trade with the Kaw Indians, mostly for furs. His first impression of this tribe was unfavorable, but in his later years he came to respect the Kaw and believed that they were an honest people. He also mentions the Copperhead Indians, who were more fierce and warlike than the Kaw. Mead and his companions are building a blockhouse in case there is trouble. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.


The Chisholm Cattle Trail

The Chisholm Cattle Trail
Creator: Howes, Cecil, 1880-1950
Date: 1940-1950
This item, written by Kansas City Star editor Charles Cecil Howes, concerns the Chisholm Trail, its origins, and its impact on Kansas. Howes explains that the Chisholm Trail was named after Jesse Chisholm who, along with James R. Mead, "freighted goods over the trail for years." According to Howes, Chisholm was a "half-breed Indian who engaged in the trading business for many years and established several trading posts in the Indian Territory [most of the land west of the Mississippi during that period]."


Trails correspondence

Trails correspondence
Date: 1905-2003
Letters, accounts, correspondence, and reminiscences of trails. Some trails covered are the Chisholm, California, Palo Duro, Jones and Plummer, Oregon, and the Butterfield Overland.


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