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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Benjamin S. Paulen, Kansas Governor

Benjamin S. Paulen, Kansas Governor
Creator: Hill, F.W.
Date: March 17, 1927
This black and white photograph shows Kansas Governor Benjamin S. Paulen sitting at his desk in the governor's office to commemorate his signing of the Kindergarten bill. Individuals in the photograph are identified on the back of the photograph from left to right.


Governor William Graves evolution received correspondence

Governor William Graves evolution received correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1995-2003 : Graves)
Date: 1999
William Graves compiled this series of correspondence on the teaching of evolution in public schools from letters he received in 1999 while governor of Kansas. The letters are responding to an April 1999 decision by the Kansas State Board of Education to remove evolution from Kansas teaching standards. Out of the hundreds of letters Graves' office received on this topic, he destroyed all but thirty. Copies of related articles and editorials from The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, U.S. News and World Report, and the Oregonian sent with the correspondence have not been included here due to copyright restrictions.


Johnston Lykins' Shawnee verb conjugations

Johnston Lykins' Shawnee verb conjugations
Creator: Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876
Date: 1842
In his journal Johnston Lykins, a missionary to the Shawnee Indians in Kansas Territory, jotted down verb conjugations for the Shawnee alphabet he had developed while working at the Shawnee Mission. The notes include both singular and plural forms of the verb "to strike" in English and in Shawnee.


Johnston Lykins Journal Entries

Johnston Lykins Journal Entries
Creator: Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876
Date: February 23, 1842-March 5, 1842
Dr. Johnston Lykins, a Baptist missionary to the Shawnee Indians in Indian Territory (present-day Kansas), edited the Shawnee Sun, a newspaper printed in the Shawnee language. In these journal entries from 1842, Lykins wrote about his efforts to teach Shawnee pupils how to read under this alphabet (the Shawnee language had no written system). Lykins also spent some time traveling to visit and treat the sick.


Jotham Meeker to Rev. Lucius Bolles

Jotham Meeker to Rev. Lucius Bolles
Creator: Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855
Date: February 13, 1839
In this letter, Jotham Meeker, a missionary to the Ottawa Indians, provided a description of his work teaching the Ottawa how to read and write in their own language. According to Meeker, the Ottawa were eager for their children to learn English as well. Meeker's mission was located near present-day Ottawa, Kansas. Reverend Lucius Bolles, the recipient of this letter, was Meeker's contact at the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions.


Report of the majority, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

Report of the majority, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus
Date: 1880
This report, written by the majority party of the Senate select committee investigating the Exodus, outlines the majority's conclusions about why Southern blacks were emigrating to the North during the post-Civil War period. This committee, composed of majority and minority parties, had taken testimony from hundreds of people having direct knowledge of the exodus movement. In essence, the majority party (the Democrats) concluded that blacks in the South had not emigrated due to "any deprivation of their political rights or any hardship in their condition" in their home state. Furthermore, the report maintained that aid societies in the North (such as the Freedmen's Aid Association of Topeka) were working with the Republican Party to encourage black emigration for purely political means. The majority party was composed of three senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), and George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio).


Student working on arithmetic

Student working on arithmetic
Date: Between 1890 and 1920
This photograph shows a young boy standing at a chalk board working on arithmetic.


The making of a textbook, Kansas State Printer

The making of a textbook, Kansas State Printer
Creator: Smith, Steve
Date: Between 1933-1944
This silent film shows the production of a geography textbook by the Kansas State Printer, Topeka, Kansas. William C. Austin served as Kansas State Printer between 1911-1915 and 1933-1944. This film was probably made during his second term. Photographed by Steve Smith.


Vocabulary of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)

Vocabulary of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)
Date: Between 1830 and 1855
This vocabulary of the Shawanoe (Shawnee) Indians includes the English word or numeral followed by a phonetic spelling of the Shawnee translation. The chart includes numbers, common nouns such as "man" and "deer," and simple phrases such as "I am very well." The origin of the vocabulary is unknown, but Jotham Meeker, a Baptist missionary in Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) did devise a written language for the Shawnee, which had previously been only a spoken language. The notation on the top of the manuscript reads "H. Howe 1875, p. 590."


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