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Hattie Parkerson at the Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas

Hattie Parkerson at the Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
Two photographs of Hattie Parkerson, the adopted niece of Isaac Goodnow, with her cats at the Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Hattie Parkerson at the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Hattie Parkerson at the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
This is a photograph of Hattie Parkerson, Isaac Goodnow's adopted niece, at the Isaac Goodnow home in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow's residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow's residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: October 15, 1938
A photograph of the Isaac T. Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied, is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow correspondence

Isaac Goodnow correspondence
Date: 1826-1940
This series of the Isaac Tichenor Goodnow collection includes sent and received correspondence of Isaac T. Goodnow (1814-1894) and also the correspondence of his brother, William E. Goodnow (1807-1876). This correspondence includes early courtship letters between Isaac and his future wife, Ellen Denison, as well as letters between William and his future wife, Harriet Paddleford. There are also several letters written by their brother, Jotham Goodnow. The correspondence is arranged in chronological order. Box 6 includes undated letters arranged by the first letter of the correspondent's last name. Isaac Goodnow moved to Kansas in 1855 and established the town of Manhattan and Bluemont Central Colllege. He died on March 20, 1894.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
A photograph of a Mr. Charlson in the driveway of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied, is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
A photograph showing the backyard of the Isaac Goodnow residence in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
These are two photographs of Mrs. Payne with her daughter and Hattie Parkerson, Isaac Goodnow's adopted niece, at the Isaac Goodnow home in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: Between 1938 and 1939
This is a photograph of the Isaac T. Goodnow house well. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The company had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas. He died in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
These are two photographs of the Isaac Goodnow property. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The company had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas. He died in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
Two photographs featuring Hattie Parkerson at the Isaac T. Goodnow residence. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac T. Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac T. Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1936
A view of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, and came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Isaac Tichenor Goodnow
Isaac Goodnow was an early resident of Manhattan, Kansas, and was a free-state supporter. He was a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention and was one of the founders of Bluemont College.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1972
Several views of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: 1957
Three views of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1972
Three photographs of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow house, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1972
Five views of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied, is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow house and barn, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow house and barn, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1965
Views of the Issac Goodnow house and barn in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1972
Four views of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Views of the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Views of the Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1889
Two views of the Isaac Goodnow house in Manhattan, Kansas. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, and came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which has developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas, until his passing in 1894. The house that he and his wife Ellen occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


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