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Daniel L. Chandler to James H. Buxton

Daniel L. Chandler to James H. Buxton
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: May 5, 1862
This letter, written by Daniel L. Chandler "on the prairie five miles west of Ft. Scott," was addressed to James H. Buxton, a young soldier who had been under Chandler's care as army hospital steward. Chandler expressed joy that Buxton's health continued to improve in Lawrence and that he was being educated. Chandler also related news of Buxton's fellow soldiers and discharge from the Union army.


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: September 11, 1861
A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler describes conditions at the fort, including supplies and food rations. He also discusses his role in caring for sick soldiers.


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: September 25, 1861-October 6, 1861
A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from three locations (West Point, Bates County, Missouri; Mapleton, Missouri; and Kansas City, Missouri) on three separate dates, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler describes in detail his experiences caring for sick and wounded soldiers. He expresses great emotion at the destruction and carnage he's witnessed in Missouri. Chandler also discusses the "humanity" of the army hospital surgeons, whose greatest priority is "the health of the soldier."


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: April 22, 1862
This letter was written by Daniel L. Chandler from Paola, Kansas, to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The first portion of Chandler's letter describes a young soldier named James, apparently recuperating from illness and under Brown's care and supervision in Lawrence. Chandler speaks of promotions and new officers in the army and his contentment with his "humble position" as hospital steward. He also writes of his popularity with the troops and his efforts to obtain "comforts" for them.


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: April 26, 1862
A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from Mound City, Kansas, to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler described promotions and staff changes in the regiments at Mound City, as well as a petition to prevent his removal as hospital steward. Chandler also wrote of the deaths of soldiers and a new order that would discharge soldiers who spent two months in the hospital.


Hannah Russell to Mary Brown

Hannah Russell to Mary Brown
Creator: Russell, Hannah Ripley
Date: December 15, 1861
This letter, written by Hannah Russell from Salem, Massachusetts, on two different dates, was addressed to Mary Brown, the name of both her sister and niece. Russell primarily discusses local efforts in Massachusetts to make clothing for soldiers and those who had escaped from slavery. She told Mary that the antislavery society would send garments to Lawrence on the condition that they would only be given to fugitive slaves. Russell also expressed her fear of a military attack on the United States by Great Britain. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


J. Heath to John Stillman Brown

J. Heath to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Heath, J.
Date: September 30, 1862
A letter written by J. Heath from Paola, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Brown had apparently asked Heath for assistance in helping him become an Army chaplain, but Heath's letter informed him that the request was made too late. Heath also discusses camp life in Paola.


James H. Buxton to D.L. Chandler

James H. Buxton to D.L. Chandler
Creator: Buxton, James H.
Date: April 27, 1862
A letter written by James H. Buxton from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to Daniel L. Chandler, an army hospital steward who had cared for Buxton. James describes life in Lawrence with members of the John Stillman Brown family. He also mentions the removal of troops from Lawrence to Fort Riley and expresses his wish to live with Chandler after the end of the war.


John Donnelly to Miss Brown

John Donnelly to Miss Brown
Creator: Donnelly, John
Date: April 3, 1864
A letter written by John Donnelly from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Donnelly, apparently a friend of Miss Brown's, wrote how much he enjoyed camp life and asked for news from Lawrence. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


John S. Brown to William Brown

John S. Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 13, 1858
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.


John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: September 1, 1863
This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: February 14, 1858
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Brown admonished his son for not writing. He discusses the cold weather and the political conditions in territorial Kansas, including his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. Brown predicted high immigration to Kansas in the coming spring, and also predicted that "Kansas is sure to be Free" and without any slaves within two years.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 21, 1857
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, is a tender, heartfelt piece of correspondence, speaking of the joys and triumphs of living in a new land. Brown enjoyed his time in Kansas, preaching at a local church and working on his claim. He outlined for his son, who was away at boarding school in New Hampshire, his typical day-to-day activities, which included cooking, gardening, and housekeeping. He also wrote of the currently peaceful state of affairs in Kansas.


Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 23, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.


Leigh R. Webber to Esteemed Friend

Leigh R. Webber to Esteemed Friend
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: September 20, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Trenton, Tennessee, likely addressed to a member of the John Stillman Brown family. Webber describes a "jayhawking trip" his regiment took to take goods and food from a local Confederate family. He discusses the treatment of slaves and escaped slaves, both by Confederate locals and his fellow Union troops. A portion of the letter states Webber's opinions on James H. Lane's efforts to arm African-American troops in Kansas.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: January 23, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Kansas City, Missouri, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber begins by recounting other letters he had recently sent to members of the Brown family. He describes the march from Lexington to Kansas City and future plans to continue on to Fort Scott. Webber also discusses his father's recent death.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: December 23, 1864
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Troy, Vermont, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses Kansas politics, particularly the debate between supporters and critics of Senator James H. Lane. He also remarks on the "late successes of the Union armies," and worries that political tensions with Great Britain may escalate into another war.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: August 30, 1862-August 31, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Gibson County, West Tennessee, addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber begins with the news that the troops may return to Kansas, though he and the other soldiers particularly wished to avoid Lawrence due to previous negative experience there. He describes camp news as well as local individuals and commerce. The second portion of Webber's letter relates news that the troops would be sent back to Missouri and expresses dread at the prospect of guerrilla warfare.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: October 22, 1859
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson's role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown's violent actions; while he deemed them "reckless and hopeless," he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown's own religious beliefs and the violence of "the slave power".


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 8, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Bourbon County, Kansas, to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes the march from Kansas City, Missouri, to Fort Scott, Kansas, describing landmarks along the way and discussing the soldiers' state of exhaustion. He continues a discussion from a previous letter regarding his father's death. Webber also describes camp life and future plans to march on to Fort Smith.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: February 1, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Kansas City, Missouri, addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber mainly discusses camp life in Kansas City and the unruly behavior of his fellow soldiers, particularly regarding thievery and drunkenness.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: November 27, 1862
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from the "Camp of Grant's Army near Grand Junction Tenn.," was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber described camp life and mentioned the possibility that the troops would return to Kansas. He also discussed the contrast between "the pomp and circumstance of war" and the "blind bull-dog fight" he witnessed at the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. The last portion of his letter deals with issues such as clothing, Thanksgiving, and other political issues.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: May 28, 1862-May 29, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: August 12, 1862
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Gibson County, West Tennessee, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed insubordination among the troops. He also expressed his opinions on the political situation in the South and conflicting views on slavery. Webber described camp life and the role of individual black army staff. The final portion of his letter said that the draft would soon begin in Kansas.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown, daughter of John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown, daughter of John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: October 22, 1859
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."


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