Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

Narrow your results

1700-1799 (1)
1800-1819 (2)
1820s (1)
1830s (1)
1854-1860 (3)
1861-1869 (8)
1870s (38)
1880s (42)
1890s (1)
1900s (1)
1910s (3)
1920s (2)
1930s (1)
1940s (1)
1950s (1)
1960s (2)
1970s (1)
1980s (1)

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Valentine diner buildings, Enterprise, Kansas Valentine diner buildings, Enterprise, Kansas

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 733,572
Bookbag items: 38,935
Registered users: 11,902

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 86

Category Filters

Type of Material - Unpublished documents - Government records - Proclamation

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 86 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)
Next Page >


A - D

A - D
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1873-1877 : Osborn)
Date: 1873 - 1876
The documents in this file address various topics related to the State of Kansas. This description does not cover all the topics in this file. A letter on December 2, 1875, from H. M. Aller, introduces three individuals to Kansas Governor Osborn and states that he vouches for these men's financial and social integrity. A letter on March 26, 1875, from James Brown, informs the Governor a re-survey was made by the order of the Secretary of the Interior in 1871. In the letter, Brown states the southeast corner of Kansas is 20 miles below Boston and hopes the Governor will issue a proclamation extending the jurisdiction of the State of Kansas. A letter on January 7, 1875, from W. P. Campbell, writes to Governor Osborn relating to the consolidation of the fifth, seventh, and ninth Judicial District.


Arbor Day

Arbor Day
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters are from various individuals regarding Arbor Day to Kansas Governor John Martin. Some are asking if there is an Arbor Day or supporting the celebration of Arbor Day, especially educators and schools. Others are asking for a proclamation from the governor and copies of it. Many letters also discuss planting trees as the main activity for an Arbor Day celebration.


Asylum for Imbecile & Idiotic Youth, Lawrence

Asylum for Imbecile & Idiotic Youth, Lawrence
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883: Glick)
Date: 1883-1885
These letters ranging from Dec. 11, 1883 to Jan. 3, 1884 are from H. M. Greene, Superintendent of the Kansas State Asylum for Imbecile and Idiotic Youth, and Geo. J. Barker, attorney, to Kansas Governor G. W. Glick. They are discussing a shooting that took place in one of the rooms of the asylum. One letter is a description of the whole incident according to H. M. Greene. Both Greene and Barker are writing to Kansas Governor G. W. Glick to delay the governor's proclamation of this case.


Barber county organization records

Barber county organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1872 to 1873
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the memorial to Governor Osborn asking for a census to be taken of Barber County, an affidavit by H.T. McCarty to be the census taker, the completed census, and the proclamation by the governor naming county officials and designating Medicine Lodge as the temporary county.


Barton County organization records

Barton County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1872
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the completed 1872 census for Barton county, several letters about the organization and census of the county, a list of people stating that the census that was taken did not comply with legislative law, and the proclamation by Governor Harvey appointing county officials and designating Great Bend as the temporary county seat.


By the President of the United States, a proclamation: whereas it appears that the public good will be promoted by eliminating certain lands within the State of Kansas from the Kansas National Forest

By the President of the United States, a proclamation: whereas it appears that the public good will be promoted by eliminating certain lands within the State of Kansas from the Kansas National Forest
Creator: Taft, William Howard, 1857-1930
Date: February 24, 1913
This proclamation by President William H. Taft changes the boundaries of the Kansas National Forest. The original forest boundaries are illustrated on the diagram from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. The forest was located west of Garden City and south of the Atchison, Topeka, and Sante Fe Railroad in Finney, Haskell, Grant, Kearny, and Hamilton counties. The proclamation excludes land west of Syracuse, Kansas and east of the Colorado border.


Cities, 1st Class

Cities, 1st Class
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters are from various individuals regarding the establishment of first class cities, based on population, to Kansas Governor John Martin. The first documents list the first and second class cities along with the year they were established. These letters discuss the name for the first class cities, later called Kansas City and Wichita. Many people chose the name Kansas City with a signed petition. Other suggested names include Wyandotte and Martin City. Besides suggesting a name, other letters ask for a proclamation. There is a Governor's Proclamation for the declaration of first class city to Wichita.


Cities, 2nd class

Cities, 2nd class
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1886
These letters are from various individuals regarding the establishment of second class cities, based on population, to Kansas Governor John Martin. The second class cities with signed petitions for incorporation include Dodge City, Great Bend, Hutchison, Larned, and South Topeka. There are also Governor's Proclamations for the declaration of second class city to Great Bend, Hutchison, and Larned. See "Cities, 1st Class" (Item number: 454842) for a list of first and second class cities along with their dates of incorporation.


Cities, 2nd class

Cities, 2nd class
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1888
These letters are from various individuals regarding the establishment of second class cities, based on population, to Kansas Governor John Martin. The second class cities with signed petitions for incorporation include Fort Scott, Galena, Greensburg, Holton, Lyons, Marion, and Marysville. There are also Governor's Proclamations for the declaration of second class city to Holton and Marion. While most cities are asking for incorporation for the first time, some cities are asking for a change from 3rd class to 2nd or from 2nd class to 1st. See "Cities, 1st Class" (Item number: 454842) for a list of first and second class cities along with their dates of incorporation.


Cities, 2nd Class

Cities, 2nd Class
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1887
These letters are from various individuals regarding the establishment of second class cities, based on population, to Kansas Governor John Martin. These letters also include oversize maps important for the city's incorporation. The second class cities with signed petitions for incorporation include Coffeyville, Belleville, Caldwell, Washington, Nickerson, Kingman, Concordia, Council Grove, Garden City, Garnett, Harper, and Horton. There are Ordinances and Governor's Proclamations for the declaration of second class cities to Belleville, Caldwell, Nickerson, Osborne, Kingman, Council Grove, Concordia, and Garden City. See "Cities, 1st Class" (Item number: 454842) for a list of first and second class cities along with their dates of incorporation.


Cities &Towns : Winfield

Cities &Towns : Winfield
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1879-1883 : St. John)
Date: 1879
This file includes a proclamation from Kansas Governor St. John on February 27, 1879, that declares the city of Winfield a city of the second class based on a certificate from the Mayor and Council of Winfield showing that the city has attained a population of over 2,000 residents.


Comanche County organization records

Comanche County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1873-1875
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the memorial to the governor asking for a census to be taken, an affidavit by A. Updegraff to be census taker, the completed census, and the proclamation by the governor appointing county officials and designating Coldwater as the temporary county seat.


County Affairs, Comanche County

County Affairs, Comanche County
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1885 to 1886, are from the residents and offices of Comanche County, Kansas regarding county affairs to Kansas Governor John Martin. Many letters discuss the organization of the county including the controversy surrounding the organization. Other letters discuss the appointment of individuals to various offices including the notary public, county clerk, county commissioners, probate judge, and the city of Coldwater as the temporary county seat. Also, a Governor's Proclamation of the official organization of Comanche County as well as the temporary county seat of Coldwater is included. Comanche County was first politically organized in 1873; however, this was fraudulently done. On February 27, 1885, the county was reorganized.


County Affairs, Gove County

County Affairs, Gove County
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1886, are from the residents and offices of Gove County, Kansas regarding the county's organization to Kansas Governor John Martin. A majority of the letters are signed petitions confirming that the population requirements are met to make Gove City a temporary county seat. There are also newspaper clippings regarding the organization of Gove County. A Governor's Proclamation appoints a census taker for Gove County. Lastly, a letter from the Kansas State Executive Department makes the organization of Gove County official. Gove county was organized on September 2, 1886 and named for Union soldier Grenville L. Gove, Company F, 11th Kansas Cavalry.


County Affairs, Graham County

County Affairs, Graham County
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1880 to 1887, are from the residents and offices of Graham County, Kansas regarding county affairs to Kansas Governor John Martin. There is a copy of the Governor's Proclamation that made Graham County officially organized. There is another official letter for the designation of a permanent county seat. Multiple letters discuss the moving of county offices to other buildings. There are also warranty deeds. Graham County was organized on April 1, 1880 and named for Captain John L. Graham, a Civil War soldier with Company D, 8th Kansas Volunteers, who was killed at the Battle of Chickamauga.


County Affairs, Grant County

County Affairs, Grant County
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1887 to 1888, are from the residents and offices of Grant County, Kansas regarding its organization to Kansas Governor John Martin. Many of the letters are signed petitions confirming the population requirements are met for the county's organization. A Governor's Proclamation appoints an official to verify that the county meets requirements. Other letters request the appointment of the county seat and county officials like the commissioners, sheriff, clerk, and census taker. Grant County was organized on June 9, 1888 and named for General Ulysses S. Grant.


County Affairs, Hamilton County

County Affairs, Hamilton County
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1885 to 1886, are from the residents and offices of Hamilton County, Kansas regarding its organization to Kansas Governor John Martin. Many of the letters are signed petitions confirming the population requirements are met for the county's organization. A Governor's Proclamation appoints an official to verify that the county meets requirements. Other letters request the appointment of the county seat and county officials like the commissioners, clerk, and census taker. Hamilton County was organized on January 29, 1886 and named for Alexander Hamilton.


Cowley County organization records

Cowley County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1870
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the memorial to the governor and the proclamation from the governor appointing county officials and designating Winfield as the temporary county seat.


Crime and criminals : miscellaneous

Crime and criminals : miscellaneous
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1873-1877 : Osborn)
Date: 1874 - 1876
A telegraph in January 1875 asks the Governor if any steps will be taken by the State to arrest the prisoners who escaped from Hays. A letter from S. N. Wood, on March 1, 1875, concerning the sentence of Daniel Romigh and Charles Loomis. A letter on January 15, 1875, from E. S. W. Drought, requests money from the State to defray a train Jared, one of Quantrill's men and the Younger Brothers. A letter on March 15, 1875, from P. Dermmitt, Sheriff of Texas, states they arrested a man named Willis Jackson and asks if an award is being offered for his capture. A certified copy dated March 30, 1875, of the Amendment information in the case of the State of Kansas vs. Willis Jackson. A letter on April 26, 1876, J. Wade Mcdonald, County Attorney, advises Governor Osborn that Willis Jackson has been convicted of murder in the first degree.


Crime and criminals : rewards ; proclamations

Crime and criminals : rewards ; proclamations
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1873-1877 : Osborn)
Date: 1873 - 1876
A list of proclamations with dates from Kansas Governor Osborn. A letter on May 15, 1875, from C. B. Owen, Sheriff of Green County in Missouri, states he has captured Albert Russ alias Alexander Preston and asks if he wants him held until September and if there is a reward for his capture. A letter from Francis McNulty, on November 9, 1876, states the Sheriff has information on the whereabouts of Peat Johnson, charged with the murder of two young men. A letter from H.R. Crowell informs Governor Osborn on April 19, 1876, the Baxter Bank was robbed by two men during the busiest part of the day, and they took $3,000. A letter on February 11, 1876, concerning the reward of $200 for the arrest of A. J. Mowry. The following documents concern rewards and proclamations for the capture and arrest of criminals.


Decatur County organization records

Decatur County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1879-1880
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the proclamation from the governor appointing county officials and designating Oberlin as the temporary county seat. Also, a letter certifying the county seat results between Decatur Center and Oberlin, with Oberlin having the most votes. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Edwards County organization records

Edwards County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1874
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the memorial to the governor asking that a census be taken, two completed censuses, and the proclamation by the governor appointing county officials and designating Kinsley as the temporary county seat. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Ellis County organization records

Ellis County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1867-1870
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the memorial to the governor listing who should be Ellis County's county officials and designating Hays City as the temporary county seat. Also included is a letter certifying votes for Hays City as the county seat and for various county buildings to be contracted for.


Emancipation of slaves

Emancipation of slaves
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1863-1865 : Carney)
Date: 1863
B. W. Lewis Bros. of Glasgow, Missouri, writes Governor Thomas Carney of Topeka, Kansas, concerning its plan to send emancipated slaves to Kansas. The letter claims a high number of slaves are escaping their masters and are only recovered at considerable expense. The firm outlines a plan to free its slaves by November 1, 1863 and send them to Kansas by boat. The letter asks Governor Carney if he is aware of any objections to this plan. The letter claims that most of the slaves near Glasgow will have escaped to Kansas by year's end. President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves in areas controlled by Confederate forces, became effective January 1, 1863. As a Union slave state, Missouri was not legally affected by the proclamation.


Ford County organization records

Ford County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1872-1873
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is the 1873 census of Ford County, the memorial to the governor, miscellaneous letters, and the proclamation appointing county officials and designating Dodge City as the temporary county seat.


Showing 1 - 25
Next Page >

Copyright © 2007-2021 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.