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Conditions at Camp Funston correspondence

Conditions at Camp Funston correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: July 10, 1918-July 19, 1918
This correspondence deals with complaints about the treatment of servicemen at the hospital in Camp Funston. Written during the summer of the Influenza of 1918, these various pieces of correspondence indicate the extreme concern shown for the health of the men being treated at Funston. Particularly interesting is the letter to Governor Capper that was sent to him by "an Anxious Mother." In the letter, the unknown mother of a soldier hospitalized at Camp Funston pleads with Governors Capper to do something about the poor food and sanitary conditions at the facility. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Death by causes: influenza

Death by causes: influenza
Creator: Kansas State Board of Health
Date: 1918
This summary of deaths, compiled by the Division of Vital Statistics of the Kansas State Board of Health, details the total number of deaths that resulted during the Influenza of 1918. Often referred to as the Spanish Flu during the period, the Influenza of 1918 took a significant toll on Kansas with 2,639 recorded deaths. However, the death toll across the globe was much worse, with estimated deaths varying anywhere from 50 million to 100 million people. To view the full, two volume report see unit 220786. In the full volume (UID 220786 ), there is a page for each county, and additional pages for larger cities ? possibly the first class ones. Each page bears a number that corresponds to the number on the page of statistics for this unit. Numbers 1 thru 105 are assigned to the 105 counties in alphabetical order. Numbers 200-400 are assigned to the cities within those counties Examples: 1 = Allen County 201 = Iola, Allen County 105 = Wyandotte County 205 = Kansas City, Wyandotte Co. 305 = Rosedale, Wyandotte Co. (You'll notice that the companion number for County 5 is 405 as to not duplicate 205 and 305.) In the full volume, you can go from county to county quickly by using the Page Selection drop down menu (on the upper left-hand side of the image).


Deaths by counties: Topeka City

Deaths by counties: Topeka City
Creator: Kansas State Board of Health
Date: 1918
This information, gathered for the Kansas State Board of Health's Division of Vital Statistics, details the number of deaths in Topeka from the Influenza of 1918. As indicated by the number 10 which represents influenza deaths, Topeka had 57 people die during the 1918 outbreak.


Governor Arthur Capper to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners

Governor Arthur Capper to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: June 16, 1917
In this letter to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Leavenworth, Kansas, Governor Capper explains that the State Board of Health and the Federal Government is "making a special effort to keep the military camp at Fort Leavenworth, and the country immediately adjacent thereto, in the best possible sanitary condition to the end that the health of the soldiers in the camp as well as the health of the citizens generally in that community may be protected." This item demonstrates the fact that the state and federal authorities were concerned about health and sanitation well before the outbreak of the Influenza of 1918.


Kansas State Board of Health letterpress book

Kansas State Board of Health letterpress book
Creator: Crumbine, Samuel J. (Samuel Jay), 1862-1954
Date: December 12, 1905 -October 16, 1906
Dr. Samuel Crumbine kept this letter press book of outgoing correspondence during the first two years of his tenure as secretary of the Kansas State Board of Health. The letters proceed in chronological order. A partial alphabetical index to correspondents is available at the back of the volume. The letters in this volume were "pressed" from the originals onto copy paper using water and a heavy weight at the time of their creation. The impression process was a crude form of preservation and was prone to error. Too much or too little water, or weight, could result in a poor copy. Many of the letters in this volume will be difficult to read, and some may not be legible, but they accurately reflect the condition of the letter pressings. Some pressings that were impossible to read in grayscale were scanned in color to help bring out the text.


Samuel Crumbine to Governor Arthur Capper

Samuel Crumbine to Governor Arthur Capper
Creator: Crumbine, S.J.
Date: June 16, 1917
In this letter to Governor Capper, Samuel Crumbine, Secretary of the Kansas State Board of Health, addresses the issue of a sanitation zone around all military installations in the state of Kansas. Crumbine explains that, at the annual meeting of the State Board of Health (June 13-14, 1917), the Board passed resolutions to "sanitate" the zone around military installations per the requests of the Federal Government. One such resolution declared all "outside, unfly proofed toilets a public nuisance and a menace to public health." Such seemingly trivial measures indicate that military installations were important concerns for the public, as well as the Board of Health, well before the outbreak of the Influenza of 1918.


Summary of deaths

Summary of deaths
Creator: Kansas. Board of Health
Date: 1918
These two reports by the Division of Vital Statistics, Kansas Board of Health, compile statistics on Kansas deaths by cause and by county for 1918. The first volume reports death by cause; the second by county. During World War I, an influenza epidemic swept around the world killing millions. Evidence suggests the disease started in Kansas with most deaths occurring in 1918. The county numbers are listed in the volume on counties. The disease numbers are listed in the volume on causes. The social condition section likely refers to marital status (single, married, widowed, divorced, and unknown). The nativity section likely refers to native born or foreign born. In this full volume, there is a page for each county, and additional pages for larger cities ? possibly the first class ones. Each page bears a number that corresponds to the number on the page of statistics at UID 217181. Numbers 1 thru 105 are assigned to the 105 counties in alphabetical order. Numbers 200-400 are assigned to the cities within those counties Examples: 1 = Allen County 201 = Iola, Allen County 105 = Wyandotte County 205 = Kansas City, Wyandotte Co. 305 = Rosedale, Wyandotte Co. (You'll notice that the companion number for County 5 is 405 as to not duplicate 205 and 305.) In the full volume, you can go from county to county quickly by using the Page Selection drop down menu (on the upper left-hand side of the image).


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