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People - Notable Kansans - Simpson, Jeremiah, 1842-1905

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A party of patches

A party of patches
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: June 6, 1891
This political cartoon drawn by Bernard Gilliam was copied from the satirical magazine Judge presents the Republican perception of the People's (Populist) Party. The artist depicts the People's Party as a hot air balloon made up of a patchwork of pieces, with each piece labeled with the name of the political organization or party that has been subsumed under the banner of the Populists. Some of the more recognizable "patches" include the Prohibition Party, the Greenback Party, the Farmer's Alliance, and the Knights of Labor Party. Inside the balloon's basket are two leading Populists from Kansas, William Peffer and "Sockless" Jerry Simpson.


Campaign songs, as sung by the National Quartette

Campaign songs, as sung by the National Quartette
Date: 1892
This volume of campaign songs includes four pieces that vividly express the major beliefs of the Populist Party. The first song, "For Trampling on the Grass," criticizes the businessmen and bankers who were trampling on the rights of the common people. The second song, "The Republican's Lament," pokes fun at the Republicans who were no longer able to dominate the Populists now that "they have ceased to head our whippings, and have ceased to take our word." The third song, "The Wall Street Badge" describes how the government, according to the Populists, was now in the hands of Wall Street. The final song, "One of His Legs is Longer Than It Really Ought to Be," provides a comic perspective on some of the upcoming elections, including the race between Chester I. Long and "Sockless Jerry" Simpson.


Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon

Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon
Date: between 1892 and 1898
Jeremiah (Jerry) Simpson (1842-1905) served in the Civil War and moved to Barber Co. near Medicine Lodge Kansas in 1878. He unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas House of Representatives on the Independent ticket twice, but served two terms as a populist from 1891-1895 and one term from 1897-1899.


Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon

Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon
Date: between 1892 and 1893
Jeremiah (Jerry) Simpson (1842-1905) served in the Civil War and moved to Barber County near Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1878. He unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas House of Representatives on the Independent ticket twice, but served two terms as a populist from 1891-1895 and one term from 1897-1899. Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


Jeremiah Simpson, United States Representative from Kansas

Jeremiah Simpson, United States Representative from Kansas
Creator: Bell, C. M.
Date: Between 1897 and 1899
Portrait of Jeremiah "Sockless Jerry" Simpson, Populist, United States Representative from Kansas, 1897-1899.


Jeremiah ("Sockless Jerry") Simpson

Jeremiah ("Sockless Jerry") Simpson
Date: 1892
Jerry Simpson in an 1892 debate with Chester I. Long for the seat in United States House of Representatives. Simpson debated Long at Harper, Kansas.


Proceedings of the Alliance Women's Association of Barton County, Kansas

Proceedings of the Alliance Women's Association of Barton County, Kansas
Creator: Alliance Women's Association of Barton County, Kansas
Date: 1890--1891
The Alliance Women's Association of Barton County, Kansas, was organized on July 5, 1890, in Hoisington, Kansas. This pamphlet records their activities for the rest of 1890 and it also contains their constitution and by-laws. The group held a rally in Great Bend, Kansas, on October 24 to precede the elections in November. A Mrs. S. E. McCauley gave a speech that is printed in the pamphlet. Mrs. Fannie McCormick, the People's candidate for State Superintendent of Public Instruction, also gave a speech at the meeting. The organization donated $10 to be used at a barbeque in honor of Jerry Simpson that was to be held later in Hoisington. The officers of the organization are listed in the pamphlet.


Stubborn Facts in a Nutshell.  Manifesto by the State Central Committee of the People's Party.

Stubborn Facts in a Nutshell. Manifesto by the State Central Committee of the People's Party.
Creator: Zercher, Daniel C.,
Date: 1894
This pamphlet was compiled by Daniel C. Zercher on behalf of the State Central Committee of the People's Party. It contains a "Manifesto by the State Central Committee of the People's Party signed by John W. Breidenthal from 1894 and an address on the cause of the "late financial panic: signed by Populist senators and representatives from various states including W. A. Peffer and Jerry Simpson. It discusses the legislative dispute in Kansas between Republicans and Populists, legislation concerning railroads, etc. Statistics related to the various issues are presented. It also includes "Seventy-five Reasons Why I am a Populist." This pamphlet was also published in Swedish (Pam vol. 2 #9 ) and German (Pam. vol. 2 #10)


The foolish appeals of the political tramps

The foolish appeals of the political tramps
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: 1891
This political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge depicts a farmer (representing Uncle Sam) standing in his wheat field talking to a Democrat and two Populists, "Sockless" Jerry Simpson and William Peffer, both from Kansas. These three men are attempting to convince the farmer of the importance of free trade and free silver, but he remains satisfied with the current situation. Meanwhile, across the sea in Europe, there are starving peasants begging for relief. The cartoon is meant as a criticism of the Populists' and Democrats' desire to "save" farmers. Judge magazine, created by artists who had worked at Puck magazine and who allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881.


The poor donkey has too many drivers

The poor donkey has too many drivers
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
In this political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge, Populist senators William Peffer and "Sockless" Jerry Simpson push a boulder (symbolizing the Farmer's Alliance) under the wheel of a wagon that represents the United States. In the driver's seat are five congressmen, each with their own agenda labeled on their sash. The wagon is being pulled by a donkey signifying "democracy." Judge magazine, created by artists who had allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881 and its sales eventually surpassed those of its rival, Puck.


William Peffer scrapbooks

William Peffer scrapbooks
Creator: Peffer, William Alfred, 1831-1912
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
Populist politician William Peffer kept at least three scrapbooks of political cartoons during his six-year term as U.S. Senator from Kansas between 1891-1897. All three volumes are included here in their entirety. The political cartoons he collected appeared in satirical weeklies like Puck, Judge, Harper's Weekly, and various other publications, and feature caricatures of Senator Peffer and other politicians. The cartoons are especially critical of the Populist Party platform.


Showing 1 - 11

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