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Annual meeting report of the Hodgeman County Historical Society

Annual meeting report of the Hodgeman County Historical Society
Creator: Pitts, Frances
Date: September 09, 1966
A report of the regular Annual Meeting of the Hodgeman County Historical Society, Jetmore, Kansas. Listed are the officers and directors who were elected. Frances Pitts, Secretary, signed the report.


Annual reports of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company to the State Corporation Commission

Annual reports of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company to the State Corporation Commission
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: 1945-1959
The Santa Fe railroad compiled and filed these reports by law with the Kansas Corporation Commission and the Interstate Commerce Commission.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1904

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1904
Creator: Kansas. State Charitable Institutions
Date: 1904
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report, the chaplain's report, and statistical tables on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1912

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1912
Creator: Kansas. Board of Control
Date: 1912
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Control of State Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent and parole agent. General statistics on the school are also listed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1916

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1916
Creator: Kansas. Board of Corrections
Date: 1916
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report as well as general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1918

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1918
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1918
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report as well as general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1920

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1920
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1920
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, parole, and farm and garden. Also included are general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1922

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1922
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1922
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Listed in this item is the superintendent's report and general statistics. Also included are individual accounts of the students and their circumstances before coming to the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1924

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1924
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1924
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, secretary, stewardess, and parole agent. Also listed are general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1926

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1926
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1926
This is the twenty-third biennial report of the Boys' Industrial School in Topeka, Kansas. Samuel G. Clarke was the superintendent.The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent and secretary. Also listed are general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1928

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1928
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1928
This is the twenty-fourth biennial report of the Boys' Industrial School in Topeka, Kansas. Louis D. White was the superintendent. The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, secretary, and parole agent. Also listed are general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1930

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1930
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1930
This is the twenty-fifth biennial report of the Boys' Industrial School in Topeka, Kansas. W. A. Smith was the superintendent. The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, medical agent, and parole agent. Also listed are general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1932

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1932
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1932
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, parole agent, head matron, and farm superintendent. General statistics on the school are also listed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1942

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1942
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Social Welfare
Date: 1942
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1946

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1946
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Social Welfare
Date: 1946
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1950

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1950
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Social Welfare
Date: 1950
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1952

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1952
Creator: Kansas. State Department of Social Welfare
Date: 1952
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1954

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1954
Creator: Kansas. State Department of Social Welfare
Date: 1954
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1958

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1958
Creator: Kansas. State Department of Social Welfare
Date: 1958
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from various departments as well as general school statistics.


Biennial report of the State Reform School, 1892

Biennial report of the State Reform School, 1892
Creator: Kansas. State Charitable Institutions
Date: 1892
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report, the physician's report, and statistical tables on the Boys Reform School as well as tables for the other charitable institution operated by the State. These include the Topeka Insane Asylum, Osawatomie Insane Asylum, Institution for Deaf and Dumb, Intuition of the Blind, Soldiers' Orphan's Home, Asylum for the Idiotic and Imbecile Youth, and the Industrial School for Girls.


Biennial report of the State Reform School,1898

Biennial report of the State Reform School,1898
Creator: Kansas. State Charitable Institutions
Date: 1898
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the engineer's report, the physician's report, and general statistics of the institution.


Board of Agriculture Treasurer's Annual Reports

Board of Agriculture Treasurer's Annual Reports
Creator: State Board of Agriculture
Date: 1871-1873, 1876
These records include the treasurer's annual reports of the State Board of Agriculture and related vouchers. The January 10, 1872 report, written by treasurer Thomas Murphy, itemizes the proceeds of the Kansas State Fair. Murphy's reports were audited by J.K. Hudson and E.S. Niccolls. The 1873 report was prepared by treasurer George N. Veale and the 1876 report by J.C. Wilson. Additional auditors include A.J. Burdick, W.A. Johnston, J.P. Davis, C.H. Graham, and D.W. Finney.


Drought reports, Kansas Territory

Drought reports, Kansas Territory
Date: 1860
These accounts describe conditions in Kansas Territory in terms of the 1860 drought. Among the topics mentioned are the price of land (both in the past and currently), the number of settlers (often diminished from past numbers), the nature of crops, and available produce. The report includes accounts from Mosley (a buffalo hunter) from Greenwood County; an African-American named Buckner from Otoe County; Thomas A. Hill of Greenwood County; Rev. Henry Moys of Madison County; John L. Pratt of Butler County; H. I. Hunter, B. F. Vanhorn, Judge Graham, and Myrock Huntley of Madison County; Peter Welsh of Osage County; William Thurman; Osage Indians; John Jones of Ottawa Creek; S. N. Howe of Coffey County; E. Condit of Woodson County; and J. C. Lambdin of Butler County. One of the letters copied in this report is addressed to W. F. M. Arny, and was written by J.C. Lambdin.


Eighth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, 1891-1892

Eighth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, 1891-1892
Creator: Kansas State Board of Agriculture
Date: 1893
This biennial report from the Kansas State Board of Agriculture contains two parts and the page numbering starts over at the beginning of Part II. The volume contains a section on each county, providing summary information about the history of the county, a description of the landscape, crops, livestock, schools, and churches. A large number of tables with statistics about Kansas residents and crop yields, broken down by county, are also included. Other chapters are devoted to interesting subjects such as apiculture, artificial forests, loco weeds, and chinch bugs.


Fifteenth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, 1905-1906

Fifteenth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, 1905-1906
Creator: Kansas State Board of Agriculture
Date: 1907
This biennial report from the Kansas State Board of Agriculture includes information on the selection, cultivation, and harvesting of Indian corn, ideas for improving the conditions of farm life, and information on commercial fertilizers. There are various kinds of statistics for each county that include population, acreages, livestock, and assessed valuation of property. There are also a number of tables listing statistics for all counties. The proceedings and activities of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture are included beginning on page 977. Please see the table of contents on image 8 to determine appropriate page numbers. Page numbering starts over after page 1264. This section contains compiled statistics from the 1905 Kansas decennial census but individuals are not listed. A general index starts on page 61 of the Decennial Census section at the back of the volume.


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