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Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company shops, Topeka, Kansas Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company shops, Topeka, Kansas

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Curriculum - 7th Grade Standards - Kansas History Standards - 1860s to 1870s (Benchmark 3) - Fed. Gov. and Indian lands (Indicator 1) - Encroachment on Indian lands

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Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. Land department

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. Land department
Creator: Railway Directory and Advertiser
Date: 1872
This advertisement promotes the sale of 100,000 acres of land along the line of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. According to the ad, these lands have fertile soil and "considerable timber," and are in such high demand that white immigrants are flooding the area.


Council at Medicine Lodge Creek

Council at Medicine Lodge Creek
Creator: Howland, J.
Date: November 16, 1867
This drawing by J. Howland, originally printed in Harper's Weekly, depicts the council between representatives of the U.S. government and the Kiowa and Comanche tribes at Medicine Creek Lodge, Kansas, in 1867. At this council the Kiowa, Comanche, Plains Apache, Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes signed three successive treaties with the United States government, collectively known as the Medicine Lodge treaty.


Immigration

Immigration
Creator: Manhattan Independent
Date: January 6, 1866
This article advertises the many reasons that settlers should come to Kansas, including the pleasant climate and rich natural resources. The unnamed author also promises that immigrants who are willing to work hard can make a good living. The author seems convinced that Kansas will experience a population boom, as there is an abundance of "unoccupied land" ripe for the taking.


Map showing Indian reservations in the United States

Map showing Indian reservations in the United States
Creator: Haskell Institute
Date: 1948
This map, created by Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, depicts all Indian reservations within the continental United States. It also includes the names of agencies and non-reservation schools. It was originally part of a brochure for the National Parks Service.


Settlers on Osage lands, resolution of the legislature of Kansas

Settlers on Osage lands, resolution of the legislature of Kansas
Creator: United States. Congress. House
Date: 1867
This resolution from the House of Representatives mandates that the requirements for settlement under the Homestead Act of 1862 be extended to lands in Kansas recently purchased from the Osage Indians. Copied from The Miscellaneous Documents of the House of Representatives, 2nd session, 39th Congress.


Shooting buffalo from a Kansas Pacific Railroad train

Shooting buffalo from a Kansas Pacific Railroad train
Creator: Harpers Weekly
Date: December 14, 1867
This drawing, from the December 14, 1867 edition of Harper's Weekly, is an artist's depiction of travelers shooting buffalo from a Kansas Pacific Railroad train.


The garden spot of the world

The garden spot of the world
Creator: Council Grove Press
Date: May 25, 1861
This unsigned newspaper article describes the benefits of emigration to Kansas, noting the excellent soil, climate, etc. It also predicts that Kansas will become one of the most popular and fastest-growing states in the country. It appears that the article was intended to refute criticisms of Kansas that had previously appeared in other periodicals.


Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe

Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe
Creator: United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Date: December 28, 1845
This treaty allowed the U. S. government to create a road connecting the western portion of Missouri to New Mexico (which was still in the hands of Mexico at this time). The treaty goes into some detail about the specifications for this road. It bears the signature of ten Kansa leaders and three Indian commissioners, included George Sibley. Attached to the back of the treaty is a travel pass for the "bearer of this, a Kansas Indian," allowing him undisturbed passage and requesting that he be provided with any necessary supplies. The document is dated August 16, 1825, but the note on the back is dated 1845.


Why do people come West?

Why do people come West?
Creator: Kansas Monthly
Date: July 1878
This article, published in the Kansas Monthly, describes why nineteenth-century settlers were eager to immigrate to Kansas. It refers in particular to the fertility of soil in Kansas and its appeal to Eastern farmers.


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