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A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 1, 1886
A.B. Campbell, Kansas Adjutant General, of Parsons, telegrams Kansas Governor John Martin, of Topeka, stating that another railroad engine has been killed and that he is leaving to investigate. This is in response to the local authority's request for National Guard troops during the railroad strike in the three state area.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 4, 1886
The Kansas adjutant general at Parsons sends a telegram to Governor John Martin of Topeka asking the governor for permission to furnish the mayor of Parsons with one hundred guns to preserve peace in the city. A strike of railroad workers on the Missouri Pacific Railroad at Parsons led company and city officials to ask the governor to arm citizens and for call out the militia.


Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston

Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: James, Ada L.
Date: November 6, 1912
Ada James, President of the Political Equality League of Wisconsin, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, President of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in Topeka, Shawnee County. James congratulated Johnston on the successful passage of a universal suffrage amendment to the state constitution.


Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston

Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: Shaw, Anna Howard, 1847-1919
Date: November 6, 1912
Anna Shaw, president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, announcing that women in Kansas had gained the vote.


Arthur Capper to Major General Clarence Danielson

Arthur Capper to Major General Clarence Danielson
Creator: Capper, Arthur, 1865-1951
Date: June 02, 1944
Arthur Capper's telegram to General Danielson relays the concerns of Kansas farmers who fear that their supply of POW labor is about to run out.


B. S. Gaitskill and C. D. Sample to Clyde M. Reed

B. S. Gaitskill and C. D. Sample to Clyde M. Reed
Creator: Gaitskill, B.S.
Date: December 6, 1919
In this telegram, B. S. Gaitskill and C. D. Sample, court appointed receivers, tell Clyde Reed, secretary to Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen, of Topeka, of the following places where shipments of coal have gone. Coal mine operations in southeast Kansas stopped due to labor strikes and the state took control of the mines. Volunteers carried out the day-to-day work. During this period, court appointed receivers directed all activities.


C. B. Woodward to Governor John Martin

C. B. Woodward to Governor John Martin
Creator: Woodward, C.B.
Date: March 13, 1886
Labette County sheriff, C.B. Woodward, tells Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka he is unable to control the strikers who have captured the train engines by force. He is requesting military support. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


C.E. Faulkner to Governor John Martin

C.E. Faulkner to Governor John Martin
Creator: Faulkner, C.E.
Date: March 30, 1886
C.E. Faulkner, of Parsons, Kansas, writes Kansas Governor John Martin, of Topeka, stating the strike is not over. The strike had been settled and workers returned to work when trouble disrupted in Texas. Employees who had participated in the strike were not allowed to return to their jobs. Railroad workers in Parsons were informed of this and refused to end the strike in that area.


Clem Blangers to Senator Arthur Capper

Clem Blangers to Senator Arthur Capper
Creator: Blangers, Clem
Date: January 30, 1946
A telegram from Clem Blangers, Salina, Kansas, to Kansas Senator Arthur Capper of Topeka. Blangers, Secretary of the Salina Building Trades Council, requested something be done for the returning war veterans and the jobs that they had left behind that were now being filled by German prisoner of war workers. He asked that the prisoners be removed so that the veterans can have work available.


Clyde Reed to Cryus Dudley

Clyde Reed to Cryus Dudley
Creator: Reed, Clyde Martin, 1871-1949
Date: December 17, 1919
In this letter, Clyde Reed, secretary of Governor Arthur Capper, tells Cyrus Dudley, mayor of Preston, Kansas, that a shipment of coal has been delivered under emergency. "There is no way it can be changed after coal has been shipped." The state took over operations of the southeast Kansas coal fields following several labor disputes that resulted in a mine workers' strike. To remedy the problem during the winter of 1919, the Kansas State Supreme Court granted authority to operate the mines to the state of Kansas. Volunteers were called in to man the mines during this period. Frequent exchanges such as this occurred when coal deliveries to communities were delayed or unsatisfactory coal shipments were received. In this telegram, Mr. Reed tells the mayor to increase his stock of coal while there is opportunity.


David Kelso to Governor John Martin

David Kelso to Governor John Martin
Creator: Kelso, David
Date: March 30, 1886
In this telegram, David Kelso, attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railway, tells Governor John Martin the strike has become vicious. A mob has been involved in lifting rails, destroying property, and people are becoming afraid as local authorities cannot contain the violence. The railroad strike of 1886 occurred after reports of layoffs affecting Missouri Pacific workers in Texas reached the railroad engineers and shop workers in Kansas.


Earl M. Smith to Senator Arthur Capper

Earl M. Smith to Senator Arthur Capper
Creator: Smith, Earl M.
Date: April 20, 1945
This is a telegram from Earl M. Smith, Concordia, Kansas, to Kansas Senator Arthur Capper, Washington D.C. With World War II taking much of the male labor force overseas, prisoners of war were brought in to do many of the jobs left behind. Smith, the president of the Cloud County Farm Bureau, requested that more prisoner of war workers from the Concordia camp be available to help with a labor shortage that the area was having.


F.E. Shaw to Governor John Martin

F.E. Shaw to Governor John Martin
Creator: Shaw, F.E.
Date: March 26, 1886
F.E. Shaw, Sheriff of Atchison County, writes Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka regarding striking railroad workers. Shaw states that he will protect the railroad property that belongs to the city and county if the railway company will supply men to do the work necessary to get the trains running. The railroad strike of 1886 occurred after reports of layoffs affecting Missouri Pacific workers in Texas reached the railroad engineers and shop workers in Kansas. Although the governor had been successful in negotiating the end of an earlier strike in 1885, problems continued and public support waned.


Fred Iles correspondence

Fred Iles correspondence
Date: 1906-1930
Fred Iles was assistant right of way and tax agent for the Kansas Town and Land Company which bought and sold lands on the right of way of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway Company. In 1917, he assumed Ernest Warren Cline's position as right of way agent, responsible for representing the railroad's interest in all matters concerning the acquisition and disposition of land on the right of way. This correspondence includes Iles' activities and expenses accounts at the behest of E. W. Cline and the CRI&P Railway.


G. D. Stockwell to Representative Albert Cole

G. D. Stockwell to Representative Albert Cole
Creator: Stockwell, Glenn Dale, 1901-1964
Date: August 17, 1951
This is a telegram from Glenn Dale Stockwell, sent from Topeka, Kansas, to United States Representative Albert Cole, Washington, D.C. Stockwell, who was a resident of the Blue River Valley and a leading opponent of the Tuttle Creek dam construction, writes about the record rainfalls and the river discharge figures showing how inadequate the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program is for flood control.


George W. Scott papers

George W. Scott papers
Creator: Scott, George W., 1850-1920
Date: 1889-1899
Business correspondence, arranged chronologically, of George W. Scott, one of the first residents of Edgerton, Kansas. A large portion of the collection is correspondence between Scott and Frank S. Hammond, Scott's partner in a 20,000 acre ranch in the Texas panhandle. Much of the correspondence deals with their attempts to raise cattle, lease the land, and sell or trade the property. Hammond worked as a general manager for several railroads (Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad Company; Kansas City, Shreveport, and Gulf Railway Company; and the Kansas City, Watkins, and Gulf Railway Company) that were in the process of expanding their lines, and mentioned these activities in his letters. Due to their real estate investments in Texas, many letters come from banks, insurance agents, and land surveyors in the panhandle. Scott also served as secretary for the Johnson County Fair Association and owned the Gardner Lumber Company. Scott frequently corresponded with creameries, dairy farmers, wholesale dry goods retailers and seed merchants, including the Kansas Seed House owned by Frederick W. Barteldes in Lawrence. Also included are invoices, checks, contracts, and inventory lists from various businesses.


Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: April 5, 1886
Kansas Governor John A. Martin of Topeka telegrams Adjutant General Colonel A. B. Campbell of Parsons about conditions in Parsons during the 1886 Missouri Pacific Railway Strike. Colonel Campbell has written the governor asking permission to provide arms for the citizens of Parsons to protect the peace. In this telegram, Governor Martin asks the Colonel if it would "be better for the citizens to organize a militia company under command of Major Kniffin or some other experienced officer?"


Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 15, 1886
In this telegram to Colonel Campbell, Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka responds to a request for militia units at Parsons, Kansas, to help maintain order during a strike of railroad workers. The governor does not favor using the militia except in the "direst necessity." He asks Colonel Campbell to insist that the sheriff and people of Labette County, Kansas, preserve the peace. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Governor John Martin to Governor John Marmaduke

Governor John Martin to Governor John Marmaduke
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 17, 1886
In this telegram, Kansas Governor John Martin asks Missouri Governor John Marmaduke to join him in being a mediator in ending the railroad strike. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


H.M. Hoxie to J.B. Van Dyne

H.M. Hoxie to J.B. Van Dyne
Creator: Hoxie, H. M.
Date: May 18, 1885
In this telegram, Missouri Pacific Railway Company vice president H. M. Hoxie of St. Louis, Missouri, asks J.B. Van Dyne, of Sedalia, Missouri, if he has discharged any men for participating in the railroad strike. Strikers in Parsons, Kansas, refused to return to work after hearing men who participated in the strike in Texas had been let go.


H.M Hoxie telegram to Governor John Martin

H.M Hoxie telegram to Governor John Martin
Creator: Hoxie, H. M.
Date: March 24, 1886
H.M. Hoxie, third vice president of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, telegrams Kansas Governor John Martin. In this telegram, Hoxie asks Governor Martin to write a proclamation condemning the actions of Missouri Pacific Iron Mountain workers from other states who are attempting to intimidate Kansas workers through threats and destruction of railroad property. At the time of this telegram problems between the company and employees continued to mound. Although Governor Martin remained sympathetic to the workers, mob behaviors, such as those described in this telegram created an atmosphere that eventually forced him to take action.


J.B. Van Dyne to H.M. Hoxie

J.B. Van Dyne to H.M. Hoxie
Creator: Van Dyne J.B.
Date: May 18, 1885
J.B. Van Dyne of the Missouri Pacific Railway Company, Sedalia, Missouri, responds to of the Missouri Pacific Railway vice president H.M. Hoxie of St. Louis, Missouri, regarding the treatment of striking workers. Railway employees in Parsons were refusing to return to work following successful negotiation of the railroad strike. Kansas Governor Martin has asked railway Vice President Hoxie to determine the accuracy of complaints that negotiation agreements were violated.


J. D. Rogers to Representative Albert Cole

J. D. Rogers to Representative Albert Cole
Creator: Rogers, J. D.
Date: August 17, 1951
This is a telegram from J. D. Rogers, Marysville, Kansas to United States Representative Albert Cole. Rogers writes that he is opposed to the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program which he believes will destroy more productive property than it will save. He is in favor of a flood control program that will conserve all productive property in the entire Kansas River watershed.


J. P. Thomas to Governor Henry J. Allen

J. P. Thomas to Governor Henry J. Allen
Creator: Thomas, J.P.
Date: December 19, 1919
The mayor of Portis Kansas, J. P. Thomas, telegrams Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen about the poor condition of coal received. The state had taken over the southeast Kansas coal fields following a series of coal strikes in the winter of 1919. Communities experienced delays in shipments of coals and oftentimes coal not well suited to their needs.


John Marmaduke to John Martin

John Marmaduke to John Martin
Creator: Marmaduke, John
Date: April 2, 1886
Missouri Governor John Marmaduke telegrams Kansas Governor John Martin regarding the Missouri Pacific Railway strike of 1886. Marmaduke states he has issued a proclamation resuming traffic of the Missouri Pacific trains and warning persons involved not to interfere with operations of the train or railroad property.


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