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Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

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Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

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Curriculum - 11th Grade Standards - Kansas History Standards - 1930-1945 (Kansas_Benchmark 2) - Dust Bowl experiences (Indicator 1) - Oral Histories

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Excerpts from taped interviews with John Stadler

Excerpts from taped interviews with John Stadler
Creator: Stadler, John
Date: 1979
This oral history interview with John Stadler, Stevens County, describes his experiences during the dust bowl of the 1930s. He devotes much of the interview to reminiscing about how these dust storms interrupted the daily routines of those living in western Kansas. Stadler worked for the local gas company, and he also supervised the drilling of 443 wells near Hugoton. Copied from Dust Storms as Remembered by Hugoton Citizens.


Interview with Gus Kramer

Interview with Gus Kramer
Creator: Kramer, Gus
Date: 1979
This oral history interview with Gus Kramer of Hugoton, Stevens County, describes his experiences during the dust storms of the 1930s. In it he recounts how difficult it was to make a living, and how the drifting soil clung to everything, clogging engines and seeping through cracks in buildings. He also compares living during the Dust Bowl and Depression to his early childhood, when the area around Hugoton was covered with healthy, green grass. This interview was printed in Dust Storms as Remembered by Hugoton Citizens, a collection of interviews collected by the Hugoton High School Social Studies Club.


Interview with Mrs. Gus (Olive) Kramer

Interview with Mrs. Gus (Olive) Kramer
Creator: Kramer, Olive
Date: 1979
This oral history interview with Olive Kramer of Hugoton, Stevens County, describes her experiences during the dust bowl of the 1930s. She devotes much of her interview to reminiscing about how these dust storms interrupted the daily routines of those living in western Kansas. She also mentions government programs -- such as the cattle purchase program -- that provided relief for citizens suffering from unemployment. During a particularly bad spell, her husband (who also gave an interview) sent her and their children east to Kansas City (it is not clear for how long). Kramer talks also about the emergency hospital set up in the basement of the Methodist Church to care for the residents dealing with dust pneumonia. Copied from Dust Storms as Remembered by Hugoton Citizens.


Transcript of interview with Sherman Brollier

Transcript of interview with Sherman Brollier
Creator: Brollier, Sherman
Date: 1979
This oral history interview with Sherman Brollier, a lawyer in Hugoton, Stevens County, describes his experiences during the dust storms of the "dirty thirties." He focuses particularly on the ways that these storms disrupted his family's day to day existence. To protect his wife Ruth and his daugther Nadine, who both had breathing problems, Brollier took them to Red River, New Mexico to live during the summer. He would often go down to visit them, driving the 330 miles early in the morning or late at night. Brollier had contemplated moving his family away from Hugoton, and in 1937 he traveled west to see if the depression was as severe in the far West. He discovered that the depression had hit those states just as hard, although they did not have to contend with the blowing dust. So, he and his family remained in Hugoton.


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