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Curriculum - 7th Grade Standards - Kansas History Standards - 1880s to 1920s (Benchmark 4) - Women's suffrage (Indicator 1) - Arguments for universal suffrage

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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Child labor and woman suffrage

Child labor and woman suffrage
Creator: The Club Member
Date: January 1907
This brief article in The Club Member describes the problem of child labor, arguing that in states where women had the right to vote "child labor and illiteracy have ceased to be problems." This information is taken from an article called "Treason of the Senate" by David Graham Phillips.


E. W. Hoch to Lilla Day Monroe

E. W. Hoch to Lilla Day Monroe
Creator: The Club Member
Date: July 1908
This eloquent letter, which serves as the frontspiece of the July 1908 issue, outlines E. W. Hoch's reasons for supporting women's suffrage. Hoch wrote that "the right to participate in government rests primarily, I think, upon the ability to contribute virtue and intelligence to government and that women possess this fundamental qualification." Above the letter is a formal portrait of Hoch. Lilla Day Monroe, the recipient of the original letter, was editor of The Club Member and an active supporter of women's rights.


Liberty or freedom

Liberty or freedom
Creator: The Farmer's Wife
Date: November 1891
This brief article in the Populist paper The Farmer's Wife explains why Kansas women supported suffrage. According to the article, which quotes Benjamin Franklin, "they who have no voice or vote in the electing of representatives do not enjoy liberty."


Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.


Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner
Date: Between 1890 and 1910
Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka's leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).


Lucy Browne Johnston

Lucy Browne Johnston
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1911 and 1915
Lucy Browne Johnston, 1846-1937, was an active participant in several Kansas reform movements and organizations. She served as president of the Kansas Federation of Women's Clubs, and was involved in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, helping to gain the vote for Kansas women in 1912. She was married to William Agnew Johnson, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court.


O. Gossard to Lucy Johnston

O. Gossard to Lucy Johnston
Date: November 2, 1912
O. Gossard, owner of a hardware and farm supply store in Oswego, Labette County, wrote this letter to Lucy Johnston regarding the upcoming election to determine whether or not Kansas women would gain universal suffrage. He assured her that he still supported women's suffrage because "every woman in the United States should have the same and Equal rights with every man in the U.S." He also promoted the cause of suffrage at a local meeting of Republicans.


Teachers' salaries

Teachers' salaries
Creator: The Club Member
Date: December 1906
In this article, Elizabeth J. Hauser describes how the disparity between male and female teachers' salaries is due in large part to the fact that women do not have the right to vote. According to the author, in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho--where women did have full suffrage--teachers' salaries were higher overall and women received salaries equal to those of their male counterparts.


The Suffrage Song Book

The Suffrage Song Book
Creator: Roby, Henry W.
Date: 1909
This song book contains 28 songs (all set to common tunes) that express the women's rights perspective. Titles include "Dare You Do It?" and the "Great Army," both to the tune of the "Battle Hymn of the Republic"; "Freedom's Anthem" to the tune "Swanee River"; "Three Blind Men" to "Three Blind Mice"; "Woman" to the song "America" and many others. The lyrics of these songs illustrate the major issues in the women's rights movement. The songs were written by Henry W. Roby, a prominent medical doctor, and published by Crane and Company in Topeka, Kansas.


The annual K.E.S.A. convention

The annual K.E.S.A. convention
Creator: The Club Member
Date: December 1907
This article discusses the most recent meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, held in Topeka. The main business conducted at the meeting was discussion about whether or not the Kansas chapter should withdraw from the national association. Lila Day Monroe, president of the K.E.S.A., offered her reasons for supporting this withdrawal. Her resolutions explain the goals of the K.E.S.A. and are intended to inform readers of The Club Member about this very important decision. The vote on the measure was almost unanimously in favor of withdrawal. The article also notes that at this meeting the organization voted to make The Club Member their official magazine.


The female vote

The female vote
Creator: The Club Member
Date: May 1909
This article outlines the resolutions made at the annual convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association meeting on October 30, 1908. These resolutions explain the reasons why these women supported female suffrage, including their belief that "we deem it more direct, more womanly, more dignified to cast our own ballot than to ask some man for his vote on a matter that concerns us vitally." As stated near the beginning of the article, the members of this group took their cue from the declaration of women's rights from the first suffrage convention in the United States, held at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.


Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.

Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: December 1908
This article outlines the resolutions made at the annual convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association meeting on October 30, 1908. These resolutions explain the reasons why these women supported female suffrage, including their belief that "we deem it more direct, more womanly, more dignified to cast our own ballot than to ask some man for his vote on a matter that concerns us vitally." As stated near the beginning of the article, the members of this group took their cue from the declaration of women's rights from the first suffrage convention in the United States, held at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.


Women and state affairs

Women and state affairs
Date: Between 1910 and 1920
This clipping from an unidentified newspaper provides a humorous poem poking fun at Kansas men who are opposed to the women's suffrage movement. In the poem, a husband laments that his wife simply can't understand the importance of politics because she is too concerned with providing for her family.


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