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United States mail delivery vehicle, used by the Syracuse, Hamilton County, Kansas post office United States mail delivery vehicle, used by the Syracuse, Hamilton County, Kansas post office

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Draft of the Wakarusa treaty

Draft of the Wakarusa treaty
Creator: Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877
Date: December 08, 1855
On November 21, 1855, Charles W. Dow, a free-state man, was shot by Franklin N. Coleman, a pro-slavery leader, near Hickory Point, Douglas County, in a dispute over a claim. Sheriff Jones, of Douglas County, arrested Jacob Branson, who lived with Dow. Branson was subsequently taken from Sheriff Jones by a group of free-state men. Sheriff Jones and approximately 1500 militia volunteers from Missouri laid seige to Lawrence, claiming there was a rebellion. By December 8, the free-state forces, led by James Lane, Charles Robinson and Lyman Allen, convinced Governor Shannon that they were only planning to defend Lawrence, not go on the offensive. These documents, from what came to be called the "Wakarusa War," include an officer's commission and several discharges of members of the Kansas Rifles No. 1--the free-state militia--and a draft of the treaty that was signed by Lane, Robinson, and Governor Wilson Shannon to end the "war."


Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe

Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe
Creator: United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Date: December 28, 1845
This treaty allowed the U. S. government to create a road connecting the western portion of Missouri to New Mexico (which was still in the hands of Mexico at this time). The treaty goes into some detail about the specifications for this road. It bears the signature of ten Kansa leaders and three Indian commissioners, included George Sibley. Attached to the back of the treaty is a travel pass for the "bearer of this, a Kansas Indian," allowing him undisturbed passage and requesting that he be provided with any necessary supplies. The document is dated August 16, 1825, but the note on the back is dated 1845.


Treaty between the United States of America and the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Indians

Treaty between the United States of America and the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Indians
Creator: United States
Date: October 14, 1865
This item, a treaty signed between the U.S. and the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, was concluded on October 14, 1865, and proclaimed on February 2, 1867, during the presidency of Andrew Johnson. The treaty deliberations took place at a camp along the Arkansas River in Kansas, and was led by U.S. Commissioners John Sanborn, William Carney, Thomas Murphy, Kit Carson, William Bent, Jesse Henry Leavenworth (son of General Henry Leavenworth), and James Steele.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 1, Field notes

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 1, Field notes
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1830-1838
This volume includes field notes and surveys of Indian lands and some treaties made between the U. S. and various Indian tribes (1830-1838). Included are several maps of Indian reservations in Kansas. William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) served as Indian Superintendent for the central superintendency until his death in 1838. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.


Wakarusa Treaty

Wakarusa Treaty
Creator: Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877
Date: December 8, 1855
A draft of an agreement between Governor Wilson Shannon, representing the territorial government, and Charles Robinson and James Lane, representing the free state movement, settling the dispute that resulted in the Wakarusa War. In essence, Robinson and Lane pledged to "aid in the execution of any legal process" against individuals involved in rescuing free state supporter Jacob Branson provided that these individuals received a hearing before a U.S. District Court judge. This compromise ended the Wakarusa War.


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