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Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1909
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
This sepia-colored postcard shows the backside of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1911 and 1912
This postcard shows a group of men dismantling the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Uhls, Bessie B.
Date: Between 1880s and 1912s
This colored postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This stereograph shows Emma Florilla Adair Remington and her two daughters Ada and Jessie in front of the Adair-Brown cabin before it was moved to the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: 1900
This black and white photograph, copied from the Album Souvenir Letter: Osawatomie, Kansas by Jones Studio, shows the Adair-Brown cabin and an insert of the 1877 Soldiers Monument to honor the men killed in the "Battle of Osawatomie". The cabin, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
This colored postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
This illustration shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
These two sepia-colored photographs show the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Walker, Russell W.
Date: Between 1928 and 1959
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was later sold ,in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the caretakers cottage (on left) and the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1928 and 1965
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was sold, in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This axe head was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The Western or Wisconsin style axe head has a faint manufacturer's mark. It is 22.5 cm long with one bit end measuring 11.9 cm and the other 11.1 cm.


B. F. Stinson and Company Bottle from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

B. F. Stinson and Company Bottle from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1890-1912
This complete bottle was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The clear glass bottle may have once held shoe polish. Embossed on the front and back panels is the advertising "B. F. STINSON & CO BUFFALO, N.Y. U.S.A."


Baker's Standard Flavoring Extracts bottle, 14MM327

Baker's Standard Flavoring Extracts bottle, 14MM327
Date: 1880-1962
A bottle recovered from the original site of the Adair Cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. It's bold lettering announces that it once held Baker's Standard Flavoring Extract made by the Baker Extract Company of Springfield, Massachusetts.


Bowl from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Bowl from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This bowl or sauce dish was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The ten sherds were refit after the excavation. The bowl has a gray and pink floral motif with a silver band around the rim.


"Brother" Cup from the Adair Cabin Site

"Brother" Cup from the Adair Cabin Site
Date: 1858-1912
This porcelain tea cup, missing its handle, was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The base of the cup has the country of origin labeling indicating it was made in Germany. The Tariff Act of 1891 made mandatory country of origin labeling in the United States, though Europe had enacted such laws earlier.


Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These five buttons were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The buttons include a handmade wooden five-hole button with offset holes, two shell 4-hole buttons, a china 4-hole button, and a china 2-hole button. The four white buttons were likely used on shirts, waistcoats, underwear, or for children's clothing. The larger wooden button could have been used for trousers, jackets, and some dresses.


Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These five buttons were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The buttons include two bone 4-hole recessed buttons, half of a dark blue china 4-hole button, a metal loop or shank button that may have once had a pattern, and a small metal 2-hole button.


Canning Jar Liners from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Canning Jar Liners from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These three canning jar lid liners were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. All three liners are made of milk glass. One liner is labeled "WHITE CROWN CAP PAT - 11 - 22 10." Another liner, two fragments refitted, is decorated with concentric rings. The final example has the advertising "GENUINE BOYD'S CAP FOR MASON JARS."


Carter Ink Bottle from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Carter Ink Bottle from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1858-1912
This square machine-made clear glass bottle was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. This small bottle advertises "CARTER'S" ink, which began operation in 1858 in Boston, Massachusetts.


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