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A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen
Creator: Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-
Date: December 11, 1919
Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.


A. H. Gufler to Governor Henry Allen

A. H. Gufler to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Gufler, A. H
Date: December 22, 1919
In this letter, grocer A. H. Gufler writes the governor about the dangers of "anti-profiteering." The governor has called for a special legislative session to address labor disputes and had received many letters on the matter. In this correspondence, Gufler includes an article published in Collier's Weekly that compares the working family in 1880 and 1921.


A.M. Meyers to Governor Henry Allen

A.M. Meyers to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Meyers, A.M.
Date: December 31, 1919
In this letter, Meyers outlines ten items that he suggests would "fix" the proposed industrial court legislation. The legislation would have a tribunal decide on labor problems between employers and their employees.


A.P.Barrett  to Governor Allen

A.P.Barrett to Governor Allen
Creator: Barrett, A.P.
Date: January 9, 1920
A.P.Barrett, of Pratt, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry Allen, of Topeka, congratulating him on the "good fight" and expressing gratitude for his work in developing the industrial court. The Kansas Court of Industrial Relations was created in 1920 to mediate between labor and industry. The court was abolished in 1925.


Alexander Howat interview

Alexander Howat interview
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: April 12 - 14, 1921
In this series of articles, Alexander Howat, president of the Kansas miners, pleads the cause of organized labor and denounces the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations in an interview with Topeka Journal staff reporters. The reporters were Wm Huggins, Jr, son of the current Court of Industrial Relations judge, and Mildred Reed, daughter of a former judge.


Allen and Gompers debate letters

Allen and Gompers debate letters
Creator: Colliers Magazine
Date: November 27, 1920
In these letters submitted to the Colliers Magazine, Kansas Governor Henry Allen and Samuel Gompers, of the American Federation of Labor, continue the debate over the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations and workers' right to strike. The letters were written two months after the Allen-Gompers debate on the strike issue held in Carnegie Hall New York.


Art Welch to Governor Henry Allen

Art Welch to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: United Mine Workers of America
Date: January 4, 1920
Art Welch, secretary to Local Union 960, Mulberry, Kansas, writes to Governor Allen opposing the proposed Court of Industrial Relations. The legislation would have a tribunal decide on labor problems between employers and their employees. Unions throughout the state generally opposed the creation of an "industrial court" that opposed the right to strike. This proposed legislation, Senate bill 1, successfully passed both the house and senate and became law in January 1920.


Can't fix women's wages

Can't fix women's wages
Date: July 11, 1925
The Kansas Court of Industrial relations is not empowered to determine minimum wage for women and minors in industry reads an article in the Kansas City Star. The constitutional right of the Industrial Court to fix wages continued for several years following the creation of the Court by a special session of the Kansas Legislature in 1921. Challenged by the Topeka Packing Company and the Topeka Laundry Company in the United States Supreme Court, the court was declared unconstitutional in 1925.


Court of Industrial Relations annual reports

Court of Industrial Relations annual reports
Creator: Kansas. Court of Industrial Relations
Date: 1920-1924
These annual reports of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations include legal cases and opinions, overviews of industrial conditions, financial statements, factory inspections, accidents, laws, employment services, and state mine inspections. The Kansas legislature created the Court of Industrial Relations by special legislation in January 1920 following a series of coal strikes in Southeast Kansas. The court's purpose was to resolve labor disputes between labor organizations and employers and it caused considerable debate throughout the United States. The United States Supreme Court declared the court unconstitutional in 1923. The Kansas Public Service Commission succeeded the court in 1925. Volumes 1(1920), 2(1921), 3(1922), 4(1923), and 5(1924) are included. The Court had 3 judges each session and the following served as judges at various times: W. L. Huggins, Clyde M. Reed, George H. Wark, Jas. A. McDermott, John H. Crawford, Henderson S. Martin, and Joseph Taggart.


D. A. Banta to Governor Henry Allen

D. A. Banta to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Banta, D. A.
Date: December 31, 1919
D. A. Banta, a district judge from Great Bend, writes Kansas Governor Henry Allen, of Topeka, about the proposed industrial court legislation. In the letter, Judge Santa tells the governor he has had opportunity to read the initial draft of the legislation and offers suggestions on how the document may be improved. The Court of Industrial Relations was created by special session of the Kansas legislature in 1920. During its viability, the court presided over several employee/employer disputes. In 1923 the law was declared unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court. The court was abolished in 1925.


Daisy L. Gulick to Vicente Villamin

Daisy L. Gulick to Vicente Villamin
Creator: Gulick, Daisy L.
Date: June 27, 1928
This letter by Daisy Gulick, Factory Inspector in the Women's Division of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, was written in response to Vicente Villamin's inquiry about a report on child labor in Kansas beet fields that had been written in 1922. Gulick wrote that no copies of this report were left, but that from her personal experience she could confidently state that there was no exploitation of child labor during the beet harvest. Children in Kansas over ten years old could be excused from school for two weeks during the harvest, provided that they made up the schoolwork that they missed.


Decision of U.S. Supreme Court blow to Kansas

Decision of U.S. Supreme Court blow to Kansas
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: April 13, 1925
"Hours of labor in packing houses and other industries cannot be regulated by states through commissioners or industrial courts" is the decision handed down by the United States Supreme Court on the constitutionality of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations.


Direct action

Direct action
Creator: The Kansas City Post
Date: 1920
In this speech, Kansas Governor Henry Allen declares the public is through being made the "goat" and there "will be knocking together of heads that will resound throughout the ages unless there is a speedy adjustment of the industrial conditions?" The governor's remarks came after a disruptive coal mine strike that led, in part, to the creation of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations to arbitrate labor issues.


E.H. Murdock to Governor Henry Allen correspondence and miscellaneous

E.H. Murdock to Governor Henry Allen correspondence and miscellaneous
Creator: Murdock, E.H.
Date: December 27, 1919
E.H. Murdock sends Governor Allen suggestions "to protect the CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES against the enormous expense and inconvenience of strikes?" Suggestions,such as this, were frequently received by Governor Allen prior to introduction of legislation creating the Court of Industrial Relations. Allen's opposition to labor strikes as a means of settling disputes and the proposed legislation to end the need for strikes was publicized widely throughout the country. This lead to a high volume of correspondence on the issue, both pro and con.


E.McKee to Governor Henry Allen

E.McKee to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: McKee, E.
Date: March 7, 1920
E. McKee, a civil war soldier, writes to Governor Allen after reading an article "A Substitute for Strikes" in a local newspaper. To Allen, "When I finished the article I said to my son, Read it. There is the man we need for our next president."


F. J. Huseman to Governor Henry Allen

F. J. Huseman to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Ellsworth County Farmers Union
Date: January 10, 1920
F.J. Huseman, president of the Ellsworth County Farmers Union sends a resolution from union members opposing the Industrial Court legislation. The legislation would have a tribunal decide on labor problems between employers and their employees.


F.J. Moss to Governor Henry Allen

F.J. Moss to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Moss, F.J.
Date: January 6, 1920
F.J. Moss writes to Governor Allen about labor in the nation. Included with this letter is an article written by Moss, from Kansas City, Missouri, entitled "Will Our Troubles Decrease or Become Worse" in which Moss calls for the establishment of a minimum wage.


Frank Titus to Governor Henry Allen

Frank Titus to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Titus, Frank
Date: December 8, 1919
Frank Titus writes to Kansas Governor Henry Allen in response to the proposed Industrial Court legislation. The proposed statute would prevent future strikes by having a tribunal settle disputes between employers and employees and would render a decision between the two parties. Titus offers other suggestions that he believes would benefit not only the businesses and their employees but the welfare of Kansas residents.


G.M. Rathbun to Governor Henry Allen

G.M. Rathbun to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Rathbun, G.M.
Date: October 29, 1919
G.M. Rathburn of Sedan, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry Allen at Topeka in opposition to a pro-business speech he delivered on "Direct Action" that was reported in the Kansas City Post. In his speech, the governor strongly opposed labor strikes and admonished both labor and capital's inability to settle disputes by negotiations.


G.S. Battery to Governor Allen

G.S. Battery to Governor Allen
Creator: Battery, G.S. Dr.
Date: January 19, 1920
Dr. G.S. Battery, of the Horse Review Journal, Cawker City, Kansas, writes to Kansas Governor Henry Allen, of Topeka, to humorously describe public interest in the proposed industrial court legislation. The Industrial Court was created in a special session of the Kansas legislature in 1920. It's purpose was to oversee labor disputes in the state. In 1923, the United States Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional.


George Jacobs to Governor Henry  Allen

George Jacobs to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Jacobs, George W.
Date: November 11, 1919
George Jacobs sends Governor Allen a copy of a letter he had sent to President Wilson suggesting the development of a court system for the purpose of resolving labor and capital disputes. In 1920, Kansas passed legislation creating the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, which would have a tribunal decide on labor problems between employers and their employees.


George Jacobs to Governor Henry Allen

George Jacobs to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Jacobs, George W.
Date: February 16, 1920
Publisher George Jacobs of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, writes to Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, about the recent creation of the Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. Jacobs had earlier suggested the creation of a state and national court system designed to settle labor and capital disputes. In this letter, Jacobs requests further information about the Kansas law and thanks the governor "for any courtesy you may show in this connection."


George Jacobs to President Woodrow Wilson

George Jacobs to President Woodrow Wilson
Creator: Jacobs, George W.
Date: October 23, 1919
In this letter, George W. Jacobs of Philadelphia, asks President Wilson to consider a system of county and state courts for the purposes of settling disputes between capital and labor. A copy of this letter was sent to Kansas Governor Henry Allen on November 11, 1919 and in January 1920, Kansas did pass legislation that created the Court of Industrial Relations. This established a tribunal that would decide on labor problems between employers and their employees.


George Rathbun to Governor Henry Allen

George Rathbun to Governor Henry Allen
Creator: Rathbun, G.M.
Date: January 14, 1920
In this letter, George Rathbun of Sedan, Kansas, tells Governor Allen that after being much older than Allen, he knows striking is not the fault of laborers but belongs to the owners and managers of businesses which seem to be more interested in profit than the interest of the people they employ.


Governor Henry Allen to J.C. Bell

Governor Henry Allen to J.C. Bell
Creator: Allen, Henry Justin, 1868-1950
Date: January 10, 1920
In this letter Kansas Governor Henry Allen, of Topeka, writes to J.C. Bell, President of the Central Labor Union. Governor Allen seeks to win the support of the labor unions in proposed legislation that creates a court of industrial relations. The governor has called a special session of the legislation to create an entity where labor disputes can be settled in a fair and civil manner. In this letter Governor Allen asks the labor leader to "take the trouble to get the view point of the public". The Court of Industrial Relations was signed into law in 1920 but dissolved a few years later when it was declared unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court.


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