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People - Notable Kansans - McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846

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Delaware Indians to T. Hartley Crawford

Delaware Indians to T. Hartley Crawford
Creator: Delaware Indians
Date: January 6, 1840
This is a copy of a letter that Isaac McCoy sent on behalf of the Delaware Indians. McCoy was a missionary in Indian Territory (present-day Kansas), and Crawford was Commissioner of Indian Affairs. In the letter, the Delaware asked for government patents that would prove their ownership of their new lands in Indian Territory. Apparently, some of their lands had also been claimed by Kansa Indians. The Delaware refer in this letter to a treaty signed on September 24, 1829, and express their desire to be permanently settled in this new territory. However, the Delaware did not enjoy a permanent home in Kansas--treaties in 1854 and 1860 diminished Delaware lands and, in 1867, the Delaware were moved to present-day Oklahoma.


Field notes of the survey of the Cherokee Lands

Field notes of the survey of the Cherokee Lands
Creator: McCoy, John Calvin, 1811-1889
Date: September 21, 1837
This item contains the details of land surveys conducted by John C. McCoy on Cherokee Lands in 1836 and 1837. McCoy's field notes contains details such as the types of trees, topography, size and course of streams, soil condition, etc. According to the first entry, McCoy began the survey "in accordance with the instructions of Isaac McCoy" and "commenced at the N.W. corner of Quapau Lands on the East bank of the Neosho. River and run thence up with the meanders of the same."


Isaac McCoy

Isaac McCoy
Date: 1831
A portrait of missionary Reverend Isaac McCoy at age 47. Copied from a painting. Born the son of a Baptist preacher in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1784, McCoy spent his youth in Louisville, Kentucky. He married at age nineteen and moved to the Indiana Territory to preach in communities of settlers, French traders, and Indians. While there, McCoy witnessed what he considered the degradation and suffering of tribes at the hands of whites. He was one of the first to suggest the removal of Eastern tribes to the West. McCoy achieved mild success operating missions in Michigan and Indiana Territory, and training future Kansas missionaries, such as Jotham Meeker, Johnston Lykins, and Robert Simmerwell. He spent progressively more time in Washington D.C., lobbing for the establishment of reservations in the future states of Kansas and Oklahoma. McCoy found sympathy for his proposals, and in 1830 personally surveyed future Indian lands in what would become Kansas. The following year McCoy moved his family to Westport, Missouri, near present-day Kansas City.


John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams

John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: McCoy, John Calvin, 1811-1889
Date: February 09, 1885
In this item, from John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams of the Kansas State Historical Society, McCoy discusses his early experiences in Kansas. McCoy, who came to Kansas City in 1830 to perform missionary work with his father Isaac McCoy and mother Christiana McCoy, was an active figure throughout Kansas from 1830 until his death in 1889. In this letter to Adams, McCoy relates the details of people he came into contact with, including a number of Native Americans.


Map of Indian lands in Kansas

Map of Indian lands in Kansas
Creator: McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846
Date: 1830-1836
This map represents all the surveys of Indian lands completed by missionary Isaac McCoy between the years 1830 and 1836. McCoy, a missionary to the Ottawa and Pottawatomie tribes in Michigan, was convinced that Indians should be moved to new lands west of the Mississippi River. He took some Indian delegates on exploring missions in addition to his work as surveyor, missionary, and teacher. The map was redrawn by H. J. Adams.


McCoy spoon

McCoy spoon
Creator: Robert Keyworth
Date: between 1830 and 1834
This spoon belonged to Christina Polke McCoy, wife of Baptist minister and missionary, Isaac McCoy. Christina Polke was born in Kentucky in 1787. She married Isaac McCoy in 1803. The McCoys spent thirty years in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Indian Territory (now Kansas and Oklahoma) as missionaries to the American Indians living in those areas. In 1828, the United States government sent McCoy to survey lands west of the Mississippi River to determine whether tribes from the east could be resettled there. His report provided information used to draft the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The McCoys remained in the area that would become Kansas City for the next decade, continuing their missionary work. In 1842, Isaac returned to Kentucky, where he died four years later. Christina lived in a house built for her by her son in Kansas City until her death in 1850.


Names and numbers of Indian tribes which must have possessions in the Indian Territory

Names and numbers of Indian tribes which must have possessions in the Indian Territory
Creator: McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846
Date: November 1, 1832
Isaac McCoy, a Baptist missionary and surveyor, compiled this list of Indian tribes and their estimated populations. McCoy advocated Indian removal to western lands because he believed that the white man's influence on natives was corrupting. On this chart he listed about 45 tribes from all over the eastern United States. Only some of these tribes were relocated to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas). "Do" is an abbreviation for "ditto."


Ottawa Indians to President John Quincy Adams

Ottawa Indians to President John Quincy Adams
Creator: Ottawa Indians
Date: February 17, 1829
This letter to President John Quincy Adams was written by seven Ottawa Indians, including two who had completed a surveying trip with missionary Isaac McCoy. These Ottawas, who had been offered lands west of the Mississippi, appeared to be pleased with the new lands in Indian Territory and wished to move there alongside McCoy and another missionary named Johnston Lykins. The letter was written from Fort Wayne, Indiana, but these Ottawas had originally resided in Michigan. The seven Indians who dictated this letter signed their mark to the bottom of the document.


People with partial Omaha ancestry born before 1830

People with partial Omaha ancestry born before 1830
Creator: McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846
Date: Between 1836 and 1838
This manuscript lists the names of American Indian people who were identified as having partial Omaha ancestry and who were born before 1830. This document is part of the Isaac McCoy collection. A Christian missionary, McCoy lobbied Washington officials in the 1820s for the removal of Indian tribes east of the Mississippi to unoccupied areas in the West. By the 1830s McCoy worked for the United States government, selecting and surveying locations for the immigrant Indians and establishing and maintaining missions and schools.


Reminiscences of Pioneer Days

Reminiscences of Pioneer Days
Creator: Harris, Nelly McCoy
Date: January 01, 1916
These reminiscences tell the early history of Kansas City, Kansas and Missouri as written by Mrs. Nelly McCoy Harris. The stories were published in Kansas City newspapers.


The Indian tribes of Kansas

The Indian tribes of Kansas
Creator: Howes, Cecil, 1880-1950
Date: 1940-1950
This item was written by Charles Cecil Howes sometime after World War II in order to educate the public about the Native American tribes in Kansas. As Howes indicates, the "fourth Saturday of September of each year has been designated by the Kansas legislature as American Indian Day when the schools and the public are to make proper observance in honor of the Native Americans and their service to the country. Most patriotic organizations and many of the schools provide special programs for the day particularly honoring the thousands of Indians who served well and honorably in two World Wars."


William E. Connelley to C.L. Phifer

William E. Connelley to C.L. Phifer
Creator: Connelley, William Elsey, 1855-1930
Date: December 25, 1923
In this letter to C.L. Phifer, editor of the Kansas City Kansan, William E. Connelley writes about Shawnee prophet Ten-squa-ta-wa (also known as La-u-le-was-I-kaw). Connelley explains that Ten-squa-ta-wa was at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811, and was with the Shawnees when they moved to the area that soon became Kansas.


Showing 1 - 12

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