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A.M. Campbell on the Battle of Washita

A.M. Campbell on the Battle of Washita
Creator: Campbell, A.M.
Date: October 10, 1905
In this item, A. M. Campbell relates his experiences regarding the Delawares, the Southern Cheyennes, Black Kettle, and the Battle of Washita. Serving as a ferry boat operator in Lawrence, Kansas Territory during the early 1850s, Campbell explains that he was "well acquainted" with Black Kettle and the members of his band. As the item indicates, Black Kettle was killed in 1868 during the Battle of the Washita in Oklahoma.


About labor trusts

About labor trusts
Creator: Martin, George W. (George Washington), 1841-1914
Date: June 6, 1900
A letter written by George W. Martin of Kansas, to Representative Chester I. Long in Washington, D.C., on labor trusts and their economic impact on the nation.


A brief sketch of Indian tribes in Franklin County, Kansas in 1862-1906

A brief sketch of Indian tribes in Franklin County, Kansas in 1862-1906
Creator: Romig, Joseph
Date: 1906
This item, written by missionary Reverend Joseph Romig of Franklin County, Kansas, contains a detailed history of the Native American tribes of Franklin County, Kansas, from 1862-1906. The cover indicates it is "for the benefit of the future generation of the county."


Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence

Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: October 10, 1904-January 24, 1908
In this correspondence with George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Adolph Roenigk addresses issues related to the Pawnee Indians. In the letter dated October 10, 1904, Roenigk explains that "a Battle between the Potowatomie and the Pawnee Indians was fought here [Lincoln, Kansas] in 1863." According to Roenigk, between 14 and 16 Native Indians were killed during the fighting. Similarly, Roenigk's letter of October 24, 1906, concerns violence between Kansans and Native Indians during the late 1860s when a man named Solomon Humbarger and Solomon's brother were attacked by Native Indians. After killing one of their chiefs Roenigk states that Humbarger was shot in the thigh with an arrow.


Albert Henning to George W. Martin

Albert Henning to George W. Martin
Creator: Henning, Albert
Date: August 16, 1905
In this letter to George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Albert Henning describes finding "the body of an indian with a number of bullet holes in his body." According to Henning, the Indian that he found was killed by a party of men from Oberlin who had gathered together in the aftermath of a March 1879 attack by the Northern Cheyenne under Dull Knife.


Belle R. Greene to George W. Martin

Belle R. Greene to George W. Martin
Creator: Greene, Belle R.
Date: March 28, 1907-April 3, 1907
In this correspondence with George W. Martin, Belle R. Greene, daughter of Jesse Greene, discusses the material covered in her father's papers from the period when he worked at the Shawnee Indian Methodist Manual Labor School. As Belle Greene indicates in her letters to G.W. Martin, her father's papers are full of details regarding the individuals he dealt with at the Methodist school.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 20, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses information related to the Sac and Fox tribe. Green, proprietor of Green's Library and Museum in Olathe, Kansas, explains that he interviewed a missionary named Samuel Black, who once served as a missionary for the Sac and Fox. Green explains that Black assisted in recruiting African American men to fight in Company K, 1st U.S. Colored Troops.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 28, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses details of Sac and Fox history.


Dewitt C. Goodrich to George W. Martin

Dewitt C. Goodrich to George W. Martin
Creator: Goodrich, Dewitt C.
Date: January 16, 1911
In this letter to George Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Captain Dewitt C. Goodrich writes regarding an attack that occurred near Victoria, Kansas, in October 1867. According to Captain Dewitt, he was six miles east of Fort Hays, Kansas, working on "subdividing townships." His party of eight people, which included three African American soldiers that were provided by the U.S. Government for protection, hid from the Indians in a nearby ditch. However, Goodrich recalls that others were not so lucky, including a civilian working at Fort Hays who was "scalped, full of arrows and badly mutilated with butcher knives."


Emanuel F. Heisler correspondence

Emanuel F. Heisler correspondence
Creator: Heisler, Emanuel F.
Date: July 15, 1912
In these two letters, Emanuel F. Heisler discusses the Old Shawnee Indian Mission near Kansas City, Kansas.


Fannie W. Nadeau to George W. Martin

Fannie W. Nadeau to George W. Martin
Creator: Nadeau, Fannie
Date: June 27, 1910
In this brief letter to George W. Martin, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Fannie Nadeau provides answers for 11 questions sent to her by Ida M. Ferris. The typed document contains the 11 questions composed by Ida Ferris, and the handwritten letter contains Nadeau's answers to those same questions.


Fannie W. Nadeau to George W. Martin

Fannie W. Nadeau to George W. Martin
Creator: Nadeau, Fannie
Date: June 18, 1910
In this postcard note to George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Fannie W. Nadeau explains to Martin that Shawpaw kaw kah shot himself around 1863, shortly after completing his will. The picture on the front of the postcard is of the Sac and Fox Indian School near Stroud, Oklahoma, which was the city in which Nadeau lived at the time she corresponded with Martin and with Ida M. Ferris of Osage City, Kansas.


Frank Frantz to George W. Martin

Frank Frantz to George W. Martin
Creator: Frantz, Frank, 1872-1941
Date: November 30, 1904
In this item, United States Indian Agent Frank Frantz, who served as an officer with the Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War, responds to a letter sent by Kansas State Historical Society Secretary George W. Martin. While Frantz admits that he is new to the Osage Agency, he does provide important details on the Osages' current way of life. Frantz explains that the Governor of the tribe was a "fullblood" named O-lo-hah-wal-la who had been "raised to his position of prominence on account of his natural ability and education." Frantz also points out that a number of younger Osages were attending "Carlisle, Haskell, Chilocco and other nonreservation schools, including some of the best colleges and academies in this section of the country."


George Martin correspondence on the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas

George Martin correspondence on the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas
Date: Bulk 1905-1906
These letters were written to George Martin, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, documenting the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas. Some of the letters include county maps where the writers marked the route. Letters were written by M. W. (Mike) Sutton from Dodge City; R. M. Wright, Dodge City; J. W. McNeal, Guthrie, Oklahoma; C. F. Colcord, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Geo. L. Kious,Selden, Kansas; J. D. Greason, Atwood, Kansas; C. P. Lynn, Ness City, Kansas; and Hill P. Wilson, Topeka, Kansas. Most of the letters pertain to the events and/or route through one or two counties known to the specific author. Counties mentioned include Barber, Buffalo (now part of Finney), Clark, Comanche, Decatur, Foote / Gray, Gove, Lane, Meade, Rawlins, and Sheridan. County maps exist for Clark, Comanche, Decatur, Gove, Meade, Rawlins, and Sheridan plus a state map. It is not clear who added the information to the maps. This collection of correspondence was digitized with funds donated by the Shears/Hubbard families in memory of William Chalfant.


George Pierson Morehouse to George W. Martin

George Pierson Morehouse to George W. Martin
Creator: Morehouse, George Pierson, b. 1859
Date: April 16, 1904
In this letter to George W. Martin, George P. Morehouse discusses the "Fool Chiefs" of the Kaw tribe. According to Morehouse, the two "Fool Chiefs" were well-known Kaw leaders who were father and son. Morehouse also mentions that the Kaws "governed and usually operated in all things by threes." Finally, Morehouse states that the title of "Fool Chief" was not an insult but something that "could only be maintained by brave and warlike qualities along with good conduct and wisdom in council."


George W. Martin certificate of appointment

George W. Martin certificate of appointment
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Date: March 08, 1865
This certificate appointing George W. Martin, Register of the Land Office at Junction City, Kansas. The certificate is signed by Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and John Palmer Usher, Secretary of the Interior.


George W. Martin to Ida M. Ferris

George W. Martin to Ida M. Ferris
Creator: Martin, George W. (George Washington), 1841-1914
Date: June 21, 1910
In this letter to Ida Ferris, George W. Martin discusses information regarding the Indian, Black Hawk. Black Hawk, a leader of the Sauk (Sac) tribe, was involved in the War of 1812 and the Black Hawk War. Martin explains that "Black Hawk was never captured but gave himself up voluntarily because his warriors & chiefs were captured" in the aftermath of the Black Hawk War.


George Washington Martin

George Washington Martin
Date: Between 1900 and 1914
This photograph shows George Washington Martin holding a unidentified child. In 1857 Martin migrated from Pennsylvania to the Kansas Territory settling in Lecompton, where he secured a position with the pro-slavery paper the, "Lecompton Union", later becoming the "National Democrat". He relocated to Junction City, Kansas, establishing a career as a newspaper editor and publisher with the founding of the "Junction City Union". Actively involved in the community, Martin held several public offices from mayor of Junction City to serving in the Kansas House of Representatives. In 1888 he moved to Kansas City, Kansas establishing the "Daily Gazette" newspaper. Martin was the managing editor of the newspaper until 1899 when he is elected secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. For fifteen years he collected and preserved Kansas history. Martin resigned from this position in February 1914 and was appointed secretary emeritus of the Kansas Historical Society. On March 27, 1914 Martin passed away in Topeka, Kansas.


George Washington Martin to James R. Bickerdyke

George Washington Martin to James R. Bickerdyke
Creator: Martin, George W. (George Washington), 1841-1914
Date: February 19, 1902
In this typed message to James R. Bickerdyke, George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society informs Bickerdyke that Mrs. Julia A. Chase has "concluded to eliminate the portion of her paper about which there is controversy." The correspondence between Hiram Bickerdyke, James R. Bickerdyke, Julia A. Chase, and George W. Martin regarding the Native Indian raids on the Salina, Kansas, area in 1868 dealt with Julia Chase's article "The Straight of It," particularly part of the article which questioned Mary Ann "Mother" Bickerdyke's account of the events. After all, as George W. Martin explains regarding Chase's article, "your mother's reputation as an army nurse is beyond question, and it should not be effected by a controversy of this character."


H.L. Stein to George W. Martin

H.L. Stein to George W. Martin
Creator: Stein, H.L.
Date: May 12, 1902
In this letter to George W. Martin, H.L Stein discusses his recollections of Kickapoo Chief Captain Hamilton. According to Stein, he first met Captain Hamilton at the general store in Atchison, Kansas in 1867.


H.P. Clark to George W. Martin

H.P. Clark to George W. Martin
Creator: Clark, H.P.
Date: March 28, 1907
A letter from H.P. Clark to George W. Martin, Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Clark writes about sending a set of keys that once belonged to the buildings of Fort Wallace, to Mr. Martin as an addition to the collection of the Historical Society.


Harry E. Gillette to George W. Martin correspondence

Harry E. Gillette to George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Gillette, Harry E.
Date: June 12, 1910-August 30, 1910
Items in this correspondence detail the location of various Native Indian missions in Kansas, including the Munsee Mission, the Peoria Mission, the Ottawa Mission, and the Sac and Fox Agency.


Hiram Bickerdyke, Julia A. Chase, and George Washington Martin Correspondence

Hiram Bickerdyke, Julia A. Chase, and George Washington Martin Correspondence
Creator: Bickerdyke, Hiram
Date: June 12, 1905-March 03, 1910
These items contain correspondence between Hiram Bickerdyke (son of Mary Ann "Mother" Bickerdyke), Julia A. Chase (author of "The Straight of It"), and George Washington Martin (Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society). The primary concern of the letters is to correct the deficiencies Bickerdyke found in Chase's article on Indian raids near Salina, Kansas, in 1868.


History of Kansas newspapers

History of Kansas newspapers
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society. Department of Archives
Date: 1916
The subtitle of this publication is "A History of the Newspapers and Magazines Published in Kansas From the Organization of Kansas Territory, 1854, to January 1, 1916." This history includes biographical sketches and some portraits of prominent editors. The bulk of the book contains listings of all of the newspapers published in the state, organized by county and then towns within that county. This listing begins on page 137. Newspapers that were being published in 1916 include the name of the editor/publisher, the frequency, how long it had been published, and notes about any predecessor papers. The information for each county also includes a list of all discontinued newspapers from that county. Each county listing begins with the date it was organized, the origin of the name, and some basic statistics. This volume is an excellent source on the early newspaper history of Kansas. A detailed index begins on page 323. The Kansas State Historical Society was founded by Kansas newspaper editors and its newspaper holdings represent an almost comprehensive collection of the newspapers published in all parts of Kansas, most of which are available on microfilm through interlibrary loan.


Ida M. Ferris to George W. Martin

Ida M. Ferris to George W. Martin
Creator: Ferris, Ida M.
Date: July 11, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Ida Ferris discusses Sac and Fox members, including Black Hawk, who "was not buried on top of the earth, but in a sitting posture with a seat in the grave so his head came even with the top of the ground," and Keokuk. In addition, Ferris states that Walter Battice could provide Martin with "much information concerning the troubles between the Sacs and Foxes."


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