Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Volume 17, 1926-1928

-

Random Item

Todd Strait's scrapbooks Todd Strait's scrapbooks

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 730,449
Bookbag items: 37,549
Registered users: 11,468

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 2

Category Filters

Community Life - Religion - Christianity - Moravian

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Gottlieb F. Oehler to Eli K. Price

Gottlieb F. Oehler to Eli K. Price
Creator: Oehler, Gottlieb
Date: July 11, 1859
Gottlieb F. Oehler, a Moravian missionary working with the Chippewa and Munsee Indians in Kansas Territory, wrote this letter to Eli Price regarding the mistreatment of Indians and whites' disrespectful attitudes toward Indian lands. Oehler was appalled that white squatters frequently settled on Indian land with no response from the federal government, who should have protected Indian land claims. While most white Americans agreed with the government's approach to removal, Oehler hoped that Price would speak out against federal policies and educate the public in the eastern United States about the treatment of Indians out west.


Thomas L. McKenney to James Barbour

Thomas L. McKenney to James Barbour
Creator: McKenney, Thomas Loraine, 1785-1859
Date: December 13, 1825
Thomas McKenney, the current Superintendent of Indian Affairs, wrote this letter to James Barbour, Secretary of War, explaining the perceived success of the government's attempts to "civilize" Indian tribes. As part of this process of "civilization," the government believed that it was necessary for native groups to become assimilated into white American society by adopting white agricultural methods, Christianity, and other elements of European American culture. Thomas McKenney was a passionate proponent of this system, and so he included a transcription of a letter written by a Cherokee man named David Brown who describes how his people had adopted Christianity, a republican form of government, and other elements of white culture. According to McKenney, as well as many other white Americans during this time period, the "civilization" process had a positive effect on Native Americans. McKenney also advocated Indian removal, writing that "should they retain their present location [within the United States] they will, in the course of a few years, be lost as a race."


Showing 1 - 2

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.