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Showing 1 - 22 of 22 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Capretio

Capretio
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Around 1866
A manuscript copy of a guitar solo titled "Capretio" by Henry Worrall. Worrall published his solo guitar instrumental "Capretio on a Mexican Air" about 1866 with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. The copyright of this piece was credited to J.L. Peters and Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. Worrall's manuscript copy of his "Capretio" [presented here] may date from an earlier or later period. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Carmencita

Carmencita
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Around 1896
A guitar solo titled "Carmencita" in manuscript by guitarist Henry Worrall. Worrall published his solo instrumental "Carmencita Series of Mexican Dances" with E.B. Guild music publisher of Topeka, Kansas, about 1896. The date of Worrall's manuscript copy of "Carmencita" [presented here] is unknown. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Carmencita. Series of Mexican dances guitar solo

Carmencita. Series of Mexican dances guitar solo
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1896
Guitarist Henry Worrall published this series of solo guitar instrumentals with E.B. Guild music publisher of Topeka, Kansas. The title page credits Worrall as the author of "Sebastopol" and other celebrated pieces for guitar. The dances include: 1. The Don, 2. The Donna, 3. Don Roberto, 4. Senora Petit, 5. Don Pasadena 6. Senora Puerto, 7. Senor Grazio, 8. Don Juan. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Celebrated violet waltz varied for the guitar

Celebrated violet waltz varied for the guitar
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1853
Guitarist Henry Worrall published his solo instrumental "Violet Waltz" with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. This copy comes from Worrall's personal collection. The many penciled notations included throughout this copy are presumed to be Worrall's. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Chimes of E

Chimes of E
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Between 1850 and 1900
This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript copy of a solo guitar instrumental he called "Chimes of E." This piece is presumed to be an original composition or arrangement by Worrall. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Cowboy hat

Cowboy hat
Creator: John B. Stetson Hat Company
Date: between 1935 and 1950
Beige wool felt Stetson cowboy hat. Belonged to Roy Faulkner (1911-1981), the "Lonesome Cowboy." He sang and played guitar, violin, musical saw, and harmonica on radio stations throughout the Midwest, including WIBW in Topeka. Faulkner also worked at KFKB in Milford, Kansas, a station owned by John R. Brinkley, the infamous "Goat Gland Doctor." In addition to radio performances, Faulkner also toured the U.S. with the Purple Sage Riders (not Gene Autry's Riders of the Purple Sage). He retired from show business in 1950, at which time he retired to Topeka. Purchaed in Denver at the Stockman-Farmer Supply Company, a business where Faulkner occasionally performed.


Dr. John Brinkley's radio station XERA

Dr. John Brinkley's radio station XERA
Date: Between 1930 and 1940
Dr. John Brinkley's radio station XERA in Villa Acuña, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the Rio Grande River from Del Rio, Texas.


Fantasia on Lucy Long

Fantasia on Lucy Long
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
A guitar instrumental by Henry Worrall is included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only the "Fantasia on Lucy Long." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Floating gems, composed and arranged for the guitar by Henry Worrall

Floating gems, composed and arranged for the guitar by Henry Worrall
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1860
Henry Worrall published this instrumental composition for solo guitar with A.C. Peters & Bros, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1860. Worrall's Floating Gems included four individual pieces: 1. Storm Waltzes, 2. Medley of Airs, 3. Fantasia, On Lucy Long, 4. Two Songs Without Words. This edition includes only song number four. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Harmonica

Harmonica
Creator: M. Horner, Inc.
Date: between 1928 and 1935
Hohner Chromatic harmonica with box. Belonged to Roy Faulkner (1911-1981), the "Lonesome Cowboy." He sang and played guitar, violin, musical saw, and harmonica on radio stations throughout the Midwest, including WIBW in Topeka. Faulkner also worked at KFKB in Milford, Kansas, a station owned by John R. Brinkley, the infamous "Goat Gland Doctor." In addition to radio performances, Faulkner also toured the U.S. with the Purple Sage Riders (not Gene Autry's Riders of the Purple Sage). He retired from show business in 1950, at which time he retired to Topeka.


Henry Worrall with his guitar

Henry Worrall with his guitar
Creator: Grigs, A. D.
Date: Between 1850 and 1870
Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 and died there in 1902. This photograph shows a youthful Worrall standing with his guitar. The photo was probably taken during Worrall's residence in Ohio in the 1850s or 1860s and reproduced later in Topeka by A. D. Griggs, as the border bears his imprint. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Violet Waltz" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms.


Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars

Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars
Date: Between 1880 and 1902
Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas, plays music with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harvey Worrall. Henry and Mary frequently performed together in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Spanish Fandango" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Henry Worrall died in Topeka in 1902. Mary Worrall died in Topeka in 1915.


Medley of airs

Medley of airs
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
Several instrumental pieces by Henry Worrall are included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only Worrall's "Medley of Airs" and is from his personal music collection. The medley includes the following songs: "Whal be King but Charlie," "Spanish Dance," "Gliding Jessy," "Fisher's Hornpipe," "Celebrated Spanish Serenade," and "Smith's West End Serenade." The title page includes the inscription "From Mama [Mary E. Harvey Worrall], March 9th, 1903, 715 Polk St, Topeka." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Musical saw

Musical saw
Date: between 1925 and 1940
Musical saw with copper blade and rhinestone inlay on wooden handle. Belonged to Roy Faulkner (1911-1981), the "Lonesome Cowboy." He sang and played guitar, violin, musical saw, and harmonica on radio stations throughout the Midwest, including WIBW in Topeka. Faulkner also worked at KFKB in Milford, Kansas, a station owned by John R. Brinkley, the infamous "Goat Gland Doctor." In addition to radio performances, Faulkner also toured the U.S. with the Purple Sage Riders (not Gene Autry's Riders of the Purple Sage). He retired from show business in 1950, at which time he retired to Topeka. He bought the musical saw from Sears & Roebuck when he was 17 years old.


Sebastopol

Sebastopol
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Between 1850 and 1900
A manuscript version of guitarist Henry Worrall's celebrated guitar instrumental "Sebastopol." Worrall initially published "Sebastopol" in the 1850s with W. C. Peters and Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. Included among Worrall's surviving music manuscripts are these manuscript editions of the introduction and finale to "Sebastopol." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Sebastopol. A descriptive fantaisie for the guitar, by Henry Worrall

Sebastopol. A descriptive fantaisie for the guitar, by Henry Worrall
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1860
Henry Worrall composed and arranged Sebastopol, a solo parlor guitar piece, and published it in 1860 with A.C. Peters & J.L. Peters, music publishers, Cincinnati, Ohio. The piece was very popular throughout the nineteenth century. Worrall intended the piece to be an imitation of a military bugle and band. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Spanish Fandango

Spanish Fandango
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
Guitarist Henry Worrall published his arrangement of the celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Spanish Fandango" about 1866 with J.L. Peters & Bros., music publisher, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Storm waltzes

Storm waltzes
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
Henry Worrall's solo guitar instrumental "Storm Waltzes" is included here within a series of pieces for solo guitar published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only "Storm Waltzes." This piece contains several movements, including: "A Life on the Ocean Wave," "Waltz," and "Sturm Gallop." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Untitled and Jack

Untitled and Jack
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Between 1850 and 1900
This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript music for two solo guitar instrumentals, one untitled and one titled "Jack." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Worrall's celebrated Mexican air. A capretio for the guitar

Worrall's celebrated Mexican air. A capretio for the guitar
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
Henry Worrall publishes his celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Mexican Air" with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Worrall's guitar school

Worrall's guitar school
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1884
In the 1850s, guitarist Henry Worrall published this popular guitar tutorial with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. By the 1880s, Worrall had acquired copyright to the publication and issued a reprint with the Oliver Ditson Company of Boston, Massachusetts. The tutorial includes instructions, exercises, and popular music for playing solo acoustic guitar. Special instructions for playing Worrall's celebrated "Sebastopol" are also included. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868, and remained there until his death in 1902.


Worrall's select melodies

Worrall's select melodies
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1866
A guitar instrumental by Henry Worrall is included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. Worrall's select melodies include "Prince William's Gallop" and "Princes Henrietta's Waltz." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


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