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James Hanway to Richard Josiah Hinton

James Hanway to Richard Josiah Hinton
Creator: Hanway, James
Date: December 5, 1859
In response to the Redpath/Hinton notice in the Lawrence Republican, Hanway writes from his home in Shermansville, Franklin County, to share his story about "our friend John Brown," and he hopes their efforts would convey to all Brown's "character" and "motives" and "place him in his true light before the world." Hanway highlights the attempted "rescue of Lawrence" in May 1856 and the subsequent "'Tragedy'" on Pottawatomie Creek. Hanway writes that Brown personally told him "it was a just act, to take the lives of those 5 pro-slave ruffians." He also writes that John Brown was a surveyor who used his profession to gather intellegence among proslavery settlers and that, according to Hanway, the Doyles and others were actively engaged in efforts to run free state settlers out of the area. Hanway specifically denies the story that Frederick Brown was "insane."


John Brown, Jr., correspondence

John Brown, Jr., correspondence
Creator: Brown, John, 1821-1895
Date: February 14, 1861-November 29, 1863
John Brown, Jr., wrote these letters to his wife Wealthy Brown during the early years of the Civil War. He enlisted and served as a Captain of Company K, 1st Kansas Cavalry (later the 7th Kansas Cavalry). Colonel Charles Jennison headed this regiment. It appears his wife and son John were living in Ohio, probably Ashtabula. The letters start while Brown is on a recruiting trip in Canada and Michigan. Many of the letters in January 1862 are written from Camp Jackson and Camp Johnson near Morristown, Cass County, Missouri. Brown's letters from February and March 1862 were written from Humboldt, Allen County, Kansas. Brown writes from Camp Wendell Phillips near Lawrence from most of April and May 1862. The last few letters are written from Madison, Indiana, on his way home to Ohio. The letters are very descriptive of camp life and names of many of the men in his company are mentioned. Several letters mention associates of his father's such as William Partridge and Richard Hinton. Almost every letter mentions how much he misses his family. Native American scouts are also mentioned by Brown as valuable to the war effort. Brown discusses the problems of determining local residents loyalty in the war on the Kansas Missouri border in his letter written January 21, 1862. In the letter dated January 26, 1862, and continued on the 27th, Brown writes that he sent ten black soldiers to save a slave mother and children whose owner was planning to take them further south. In his letter dated March 9, 1862, Brown describes the execution of a soldier named Driscol from Company H who stabbed another soldier, was court martialed, and shot. Brown sent a letter of resignation, because of his continued poor health, to Gen. James Blunt in May 1862. NOTES ABOUT THE IMAGES: Brown frequently made notes in the margins. To make it easier to read these images, the pages with these notes are included twice--first with the original orientation and then again rotated ninety degrees to aid in reading the note. A letter from Hannibal, Missouri, is dated December 7, 1861, but the content of this latter and subsequent letters makes it apparent that this letter was written sometime in January 1862 but before the letter dated January 11, 1862. The images for this letter are placed in the correct order for content but will seem out of order chronologically based on date. The last letter in the group is missing its first page however the content, about primarily family matters, makes it apparent it was written in late 1861 or early 1862. The text version is one file that presents the letters in chronological order, except for the the exceptions noted above. It is necessary to scroll to the appropriate date. SEVERAL PAGES IN VARIOUS LETTERS ARE WRITTEN IN A NUMERIC CODE. This code, between John Brown Jr. and his wife, encrypt private messages between the couple. A key to the code and transcriptions of the coded letters can be found filed with the original letters. The code key and transcriptions are available at the repository upon request. Access is restricted to these particular letters; researchers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian, or provide written permission from same, to see those transcriptions.


Political Antislavery Convention

Political Antislavery Convention
Date: May 29, 1860
This announcement called for a political antislavery convention to be held in Boston on May 29, 1860. The men who called the convention, who were listed at the end of the announcement, believed that neither of the current political parties truly represented their antislavery sentiments. They stated their goal in terms of liberty for all people, both black and white.


Record of arms disbursed by the Kansas State Central Committee

Record of arms disbursed by the Kansas State Central Committee
Creator: Kansas State Central Committee
Date: September 24, 1858
Begining with an entry signed by James Montgomery, acknowledging receipt a Sharps rifle and a Colt revolver "to be used in defense of Kansas," this small leather-bound volume contains over 30 such entries for numerous weapons.


Richard J. Hinton to Thomas W. Higginson

Richard J. Hinton to Thomas W. Higginson
Creator: Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: November 6, 1856
This letter from Richard J. Hinton was written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson, who was a radical abolitionist and agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee. The letter is filled with information about the struggle for Kansas Territory. Hinton mentions the trials of the free state prisoners at Lecompton and Governor Geary's order to arrest other free state figures. Colonel Titus is also threatening to help the U. S. troops arrest free state men. Apparently a Captain Homes [sic] from New York had become so frustrated that he had collected several followers and was determined to administer his own brand of justice. Hinton does not completely approve of such action, claiming that while it is understandable, it is "not generally beneficial to our cause." Hinton had experienced some personal troubles as well, when some thieves who claimed to be free state men carried off the belongings of his company, which was settled at Lexington, Kansas Territory. The letter concludes with updates about the various men in his company.


Richard Josiah Hinton to National Kansas Committee

Richard Josiah Hinton to National Kansas Committee
Creator: Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: October 10, 1856
R. J. Hinton wrote this letter from Lawrence to the members of the National Kansas Committee, offering his suggestions about how to sustain the struggling settlers of Kansas. He proposed the idea of bringing the manufacturing industry into the territory as a source of employment. He also mentioned that a flour mill would be greatly appreciated by Kansans.


Richard Josiah Hinton to Thaddeus Hyatt

Richard Josiah Hinton to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: May 25, 1860
This letter was written by R. J. Hinton to Thaddeus Hyatt while Hyatt was imprisoned in Washington D.C. In the letter, Hinton applauded Hyatt's commitment to the cause of freedom, and assured him that his efforts would not be forgotten. The letter was written on the back of an announcement for a political anti-slavery convention to be held in Boston.


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