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A. G. Bradford to James Denver

A. G. Bradford to James Denver
Creator: Bradford, A. G.
Date: March 18, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C., to Kansas Territory's governor James H. Denver, suggests that the effort to admit Kansas Territory as a state under the Lecompton Constitution likely would fail in the U.S. Congress. Bradford also seeks Denver's support for Bradford's attempt to receive an appointment as Superintendent of Indian Affairs and comments upon Denver's future political opportunities in California.


A. J. Bradford to James W. Denver

A. J. Bradford to James W. Denver
Creator: Bradford, A. G.
Date: April 1, 1858
A. G. Bradford, writing from Washington, D.C., to Governor James W. Denver, reports that the U.S. House of Representatives passes the Crittenden-Montgomery resolution, which proposed to resubmit the Lecompton Constitution to a vote in Kansas Territory. Bradford predicts, however, that a House-Senate conference committee would endorse the Senate's version of the Lecompton Constitution bill, which proposed the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Bradford adds that he believes both houses of Congress would agree to admit Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution.


Amelia Josephine Labedia to James W. Denver

Amelia Josephine Labedia to James W. Denver
Creator: Labedia, Amelia Josephine
Date: March 8, 1857
Amelia Labedia, a Native American from one of the New York Indian tribes, wrote this letter of complaint to James W. Denver, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. She was angered by white squatters who mistreated these native tribes by burning down their houses, ransacking their fields, and driving them off their land. White settlers had no legal claim to these lands, but they settled on them nevertheless. The New York Indian tribes--which consisted of the Seneca, Onodaga, Cayuga, Tuscarora, Oneida, St. Regis, Stockbridge, Munsee, and Brothertown nations--had been given land in Kansas Territory according to the treaty of 1838.


H. P. A. Smith to James W. Denver

H. P. A. Smith to James W. Denver
Creator: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: June 3, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver, reports on events of May 30, 1858, involving Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker's attempt to arrest George W. Clarke on charges that Clarke participated in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Smith questions Walker's authority to arrest Clarke, observing that Walker's arrest warrant had been issued by a justice of the peace from a township, Mapleton, that did not yet exist. Smith comments on the general state of unrest in the area, and declared that the "County is in fact in open rebellion . . . . complete anarchy prevails." He encourages Governor Denver to come to Fort Scott to assess the situation for himself and to help restore order.


H. P. A. Smith to James W. Denver

H. P. A. Smith to James W. Denver
Creator: Smith, H. P. A.
Date: May 16, 1858
H. P. A. Smith, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver, reports that conditions were peaceful in the southeast section of the territory. Smith states that he had accompanied a group of dragoons on an unsuccessful mission to find and arrest James Montgomery and other free state supporters, who allegedly had engaged in violent activities in the area. Smith comments that, in his view, the "ultra Pro Slavery party" was partly responsible for the unrest in southeast Kansas Territory, but he also believes that "moderate free-state" supporters should act to stop the violence.


Hugh S. Walsh to James W. Denver

Hugh S. Walsh to James W. Denver
Creator: Walsh, Hugh Sleight
Date: November 22, 1858
Acting territorial governor Hugh S. Walsh, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, to former territorial governor James W. Denver, describes his strategy for the upcoming session of the territorial legislature. Walsh expresses the opinion that the legislature, due to voting irregularities, is not truly representative of the people of the territory. He hopes to convince the legislators to resign and call for new elections.


J. Thompson to James W. Denver

J. Thompson to James W. Denver
Creator: Thompson, J.
Date: October 10, 1858
Thompson, writing from the Department of Interior in Washington, D.C., to Governor James W. Denver, urges Denver to remain in the position of territorial governor as a service to the Buchanan Administration and the Democratic party. Thompson indicates that President Buchanan believes Denver could prevent Kansas from seeking admission to the union until it had "the requisite population." Denver, in spite of Thompson's appeal, left office on October 10, 1858.


J. Williams to James W. Denver

J. Williams to James W. Denver
Creator: Williams, J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver, complains about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemns both proslavery and free state violence and maintains that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.


James H. Noteware to James W. Denver

James H. Noteware to James W. Denver
Creator: Noteware, James H.
Date: March 5, 1858
James H. Noteware, superintendent of schools for Kansas Territory, writes from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver seeking the governor's support for Noteware's effort to establish a school system in Kansas Territory.


James W. Denver

James W. Denver
James W. Denver served as the acting Territorial Governor of Kansas from December 21, 1857, through May 12, 1858, before he was named as the seventh Territorial Governor of Kansas, serving from May 12 to July 3, and July 30 through October, 1858. This photograph was taken some time after his service as Territorial Governor.


James W. Denver

James W. Denver
Date: Circa 1857
James W. Denver served as acting Territorial Governor of Kansas from December 21, 1857, through May 12, 1858, before becoming the seventh Territorial Governor of Kansas, serving from May 12 to July 3, and July 30 through October, 1858. This engraving was made while he was serving as a member of the 34th Congress from California, just prior to being appointed acting Territorial Governor for the Kansas Territory.


James W. Denver to his dear wife

James W. Denver to his dear wife
Creator: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 4, 1858
James W. Denver, Governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Louise Rombach of Clinton County, Ohio. The two married in 1856 and had four children. Denver mentions the January 4, 1858, election on the Lecompton Constitution. He describes the tendency of Kansas Territory residents to exaggerate claims of violence, the Legislature's lack of a quorum, and his dissatisfaction with his current situation.


James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas

James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas
Creator: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: December 21, 1857
Initial address from Gov. Denver indicating his instructions from the president.


James William Denver, Report on vote

James William Denver, Report on vote
Creator: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: January 14, 1858
Report on the result of the vote of Dec. 21, 1857 and Jan. 4, 1858 including proclamation on the official vote by acting Gov. Denver, Jan. 14, 1858.


John P. Vaughn to James W. Denver

John P. Vaughn to James W. Denver
Creator: Vaughn, John P.
Date: March 4, 1858
John P. Vaughn writesfrom Sacramento, California, to Kansas Territory Governor James W. Denver, about Vaughn's efforts to get the California legislature to support Kansas's admission as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.


John T. Jones to James W. Denver

John T. Jones to James W. Denver
Creator: Jones, John Tecumseh (Tauy)
Date: January 16, 1858
John T. Jones, an interpreter for the Ottawa Indians, wrote from Washington urging Governor James W. Denver to support ratification of a treaty between the U.S. government and the Ottawas. Jones reported that the Secretary of the Interior was not inclined to support ratification and he believed Denver, who had negotiated the treaty with the Ottawas during his tenure as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, could influence the decision.


Lecompton capitol building correspondence

Lecompton capitol building correspondence
Date: 1858
Correspondence relating to the capitol building in Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lecompton served as the official capital of territorial Kansas from 1855 until 1861. Letters include contractual obligations, claims of work, and inadequate funding from several individuals, including Charles A. Perry, Findley Patterson, and F.J. Marshall.


Lecompton constitutional convention delegates correspondence

Lecompton constitutional convention delegates correspondence
Date: 1858
Correspondence pertaining to the Lecompton Constitutional Convention delegates. A letter from Thomas Ewing, Jr. to Kansas Governor James W. Denver is included. A searchable transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


President of the Council and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas, report

President of the Council and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas, report
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: January 14, 1858
This printed document reported the votes on the Lecompton Constitution from elections held on December 21, 1857, and January 4, 1858. It was prepared by G. W. Deitzler, Speaker of the House and C. W. Babcock, president of the Council of the territorial legislature. The vote showed a majority of 5,574 for the constitution with slavery but 3,012 of those votes came from areas the authors felt were sparsely settled and thus indicated fraudulent votes. The same charges of fraud applied to the election for state officials, though the free state candidates claimed a small majority in all races. The results of the vote on the Lecompton Constitution on January 4, 1858, showed a majority of 10,000 against the Lecompton Constitution as presented in a proclamation from J. W. Denver, Secretary and Acting Governor.


Samuel Medary to James W. Denver

Samuel Medary to James W. Denver
Creator: Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864
Date: January 13, 1859
Governor Samuel Medary, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, to former governor James W. Denver, reports on his successful effort to convince the Territorial House of Representatives to pass a bill establishing a special court to try James Montgomery and other free state supporters allegedly engaged in violence in southeast Kansas Territory.


T. J. Robinson to James W. Denver

T. J. Robinson to James W. Denver
Creator: Robinson, Thomas J.
Date: March 3, 1858
Thomas J. Robinson, writing from Washington D.C. to Governor James W. Denver, speculated that Kansas Territory would be admitted as a state under the Lecompton Constitution. Robinson suggested that Denver's future political prospects would improve from such an occurrence.


Thomas J. Wood to James W. Denver

Thomas J. Wood to James W. Denver
Creator: Wood, Thomas J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Captain Thomas J. Wood, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver, reports on the efforts of the U.S. Army to maintain order in southeast Kansas Territory. Capt. Wood states that he plans to remove all troops from Fort Scott, except for a section of artillery, and he suggests that there was no need to keep any troops in the area.


Showing 1 - 22

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