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Showing 1 - 17 of 17 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Auditor, State

Auditor, State
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1873-1877 : Osborn)
Date: 1874 - 1875
A letter on April 8, 1874, from Daniel W. Wilder, Kansas Auditor, states that Y. C. Collins, Treasurer Clerk, refuses to allow an examination of the Treasury. In the letter, Wilder says he refuses to count the money in the State Treasurers' office and requests that the Treasurer and Clerk not to be notified if it is counted. Another letter from Wilder on May 14, 1874, states the law requires an examination at least once a month without previous knowledge of the party being examined.


Back 'em up, buy extra bonds

Back 'em up, buy extra bonds
Date: Between 1939 and 1945
This World War II era poster for war bonds shows a drawing of General Dwight D. Eisenhower in uniform. Many posters were designed and distributed to promote the sale of war bonds during World War II.


Back the attack!  Buy more bonds

Back the attack! Buy more bonds
Date: Between 1939 and 1945
This World War II era poster of a drawing of a farm family is promoting the purchase of war bonds. Many posters were designed and distributed to promote the sale of war bonds during World War II.


Buy war bonds. Third war loan

Buy war bonds. Third war loan
Date: Between 1939 and 1945
This World War II era poster shows a young boy with tears on his cheeks, wearing a Congressional Medal of Honor and holding an overseas cap with Captain bars. He has apparently lost someone he loves, possibly his father. Many posters were designed and distributed to promote the sale of war bonds during World War II.


Federal government

Federal government
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1865-1868 : Crawford)
Date: 1865-1868
These letters, spanning 1865 to 1868, are from federal government agencies regarding to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford their affairs with Kansas. The government agencies included were the General Land Office, Treasury Department, Department of State, Department of Interior, Department of Education, and Attorney General's office. The agencies wrote about various topics, such as providing donations, Kansas finances, the Paris Exposition, legislation, and a treaty with the Wyandotte nation.


Five dollar bill signed by Georgia Neese Clark Gray

Five dollar bill signed by Georgia Neese Clark Gray
Date: 1950
A five dollar bill signed by Georgia Neese Clark Gray, 1900-1995, of Richland, Kansas. Gray was National Committeewoman for the Democratic Party, 1936-1964, and was appointed by President Harry S. Truman on June 9, 1949 as the first woman to serve as the U. S. Treasurer, 1949-1953.


Governor Walter Stubbs to President William H. Taft

Governor Walter Stubbs to President William H. Taft
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1909-1913 : Stubbs)
Date: January 13, 1910
Kansas Governor Walter Stubbs drafts a letter to U. S. President William H. Taft regarding the collection of federal tax revenues from purveyors of illegal liquor in Kansas. This draft was in response to a letter by R. L. Cabell, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, U. S. Treasury Department, dated January 6, 1910. Kansas first adopted a constitutional amendment on prohibition in 1881 and by 1909 had outlawed the sale of liquor for medicinal purposes. At this time, Governor Stubbs was particularly frustrated by the federal government's refusal to prosecute Kansas bootleggers from whom it was collecting taxes on liquor sales.


Handy money for the poor man

Handy money for the poor man
Creator: Topeka Populist
Date: November 5, 1892
This article presents a condensed version of the Secretary of the Treasury's 1890 report on how much paper money was currently in circulation. Most of this money, according to the report, was tied up in large bills that would never make it into the hands of the common man. One of the major objectives of the Populist Party was to increase the coinage of silver.


H.J. Alvord, departmental claim agent, Washington, D.C.

H.J. Alvord, departmental claim agent, Washington, D.C.
Creator: Alvord, H.J.
Date: 1870
This business card from attorney H.J. Alvord indicates that he was well-versed in dealing with Indian depredation claims. These were predominantly claims filed by Euro-Americans living in the West against Native Americans for crimes they allegedly committed in the years following the American Civil War.


James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

James Barnes Whitaker correspondence
Date: 1855-1909
This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.


James Barnes Whitaker legal documents

James Barnes Whitaker legal documents
Date: 1855-1899
These legal documents belonging to James Barnes Whitaker include mortgages, leases, quitclaim deeds, indentures, warrants issued to the Marshal's office, tax and other receipts regarding Whitaker's real estate business. There are also Internal Revenue licenses for various occupations, records on pension and war claims, including forms from the War Department, Treasury Office, and Department of the Interior Pension Office. Bound volumes include a notebook of war claims and a county surveyor field notebook. James Barnes Whitaker had a long association with the territory and state of Kansas. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County, Kansas, in 1856 from Boston, Massachusetts, and worked as a surveyor there. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He was also commissioned a deputy U.S. Marshal. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units.


Lands, Public (Including Indian lands)

Lands, Public (Including Indian lands)
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889 : Martin)
Date: 1885-1889
These letters, spanning 1885 to 1888, are from the U.S. Treasury Department, government officials, and other individuals regarding public land matters, including Native American lands, to Kansas Governor John Martin. The letters cover various topics including questions about Native American lands, claims, laws, available land, and prices.


L. W. Halbe Collection

L. W. Halbe Collection
Creator: Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981
Date: 1908-1912
The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.


R. L. Cabell to Governor Walter Stubbs

R. L. Cabell to Governor Walter Stubbs
Creator: United States. Treasury Dept. Office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Date: January 6, 1910
A commissioner from the office of internal revenue, R. L. Cabell, United States Treasury Department, writes Kansas Governor Walter Stubbs to clarify his concern over the issuing of federal revenue stamps to purveyors of illegal liquor in Kansas. Kansas first adopted a constitutional amendment on prohibition in 1881 and by 1909 had outlawed the sale of liquor for medicinal purposes. At this time, Governor Stubbs was particularly frustrated by the federal government's refusal to prosecute Kansas bootleggers from whom it was collecting taxes on liquor sales.


Salmon P. Chase

Salmon P. Chase
Salmon P. Chase was the Governor of Ohio from 1855 to 1860. As an attorney, he defended fugitive slaves and was active in the antislavery and free soil movements. He later served as Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln. This image was taken later in his life.


Secretary of state

Secretary of state
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1889-1893 : Humphrey)
Date: 1891
A letter from Kansas Secretary of State, William Higgins, informs Governor Humphrey of the amount remaining in the State Treasury and where the funds are being distributed, leaving very little left in a short amount of time. A separate note from Higgins encloses a copy of Senate Joint Resolution No. 2 with his certificate.


The Grangers' dream of cheap money

The Grangers' dream of cheap money
Creator: Puck
Date: Between 1880 and 1900
This political cartoon from the satirical Puck magazine illustrates the Republican perception of the People's (Populist) Party belief in the coinage of silver and the redistribution of wealth to the masses. In the cartoon, Populist senator William Peffer uses a bellows to propel the windmill of the U.S. Treasury in order to pump out more "greenbacks." Outside the windmill, farmers are hungrily grabbing bags of money and carting them away in wagons. Billboards in the nearby town refer to the rapid inflation caused by the distribution of so much money.


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