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A farm out west.  Emigration folder of the great Rock Island route

A farm out west. Emigration folder of the great Rock Island route
Date: 1897
This Chicago & Rock Island railroad pamphlet promotes agricultural production and settlement in the southwestern states of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.


A map of  the route and land grant of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway

A map of the route and land grant of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway
Creator: Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company
Date: 1871
A large, sectional map of the central United States showing the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway with its land grants plus the connecting railroads. The Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad runs from Junction City, Kansas, and Sedalia, Missouri, to meet at Parsons, Kansas, and continue on to the Mexican border and Houston, Texas. There is also a small, inset map of the entire United States with the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway and its connecting lines shown.


Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Asa Tongat is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Asa Tongat is identified on the image as being Kiowa, but another known example of the same image identifies him as Kiowa-Apache. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Ase-tite, Comanche, in Indian Territory

Ase-tite, Comanche, in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of Ase-tite, a Comanche, was made in Indian Territory in the late 1870s by William P. Bliss. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss, as do two other known examples of the same image.


Big Horse and family

Big Horse and family
Date: Between 1867and 1870
This photograph shows Cheyenne Indian Big Horse, his wife, and small child. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory

Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa chief Big Tree is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Black Kettle's daughter, Cheyenne, in Indian Territory

Black Kettle's daughter, Cheyenne, in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card made by William P. Bliss in the 1870s identifies the subject as the daughter of Black Kettle, the Cheyenne chief who was killed in the Battle of the Washita in 1868. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1874-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss.


Buffalo Spring Ranch

Buffalo Spring Ranch
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: January 13, 1876
This pencil sketch of the "Buffalo Spring Ranch, Indian Territory, as seen from the north east" is taken form the Ado Hunnius diary.


Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of Cat-in-pait, a Kiowa man, is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory

Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: January 16, 1876
This pencil sketch of the New Post of Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory, is taken from the Ado Hunnius diary and depicts the post from "east of square." The drawing shows the post trader, C. S. store house, Adj. office, Q.M.[x]. House, and stables.


Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory

Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Comanche man and woman is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Comanche man in Indian Territory

Comanche man in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of a Comanche man was made in Indian Territory in the late 1870s by William P. Bliss. The cabinet card has a notation identifying the subject as a Comanche chief named Lone Wolf, but this is likely an error. Another example of the same photograph identifies the subject as being a Comanche named Wild Horse. William Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss, as does the other known example of the same image.


Composite of Satanta and other Native American images

Composite of Satanta and other Native American images
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1867 and 1875
This carte-de-visite is a composite of ten Native American images believed to have been made in the late 1860s and early 1870s by William S. Soule. At least some of the images were likely made in Indian Territory; some may have been made in Kansas. The featured photo in the center is of Satanta, the Kiowa chief. Starting at the top, immediately above Satanta, the remaining images are (moving clockwise): Arapaho camp; two Arapaho girls; Kiowa or Kiowa-Apache man named Asa Tongat; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne woman; Cheyenne man; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne or Arapaho woman; and, two unidentified young women. Two of the photos are an exact match of a known Soule image (Satanta and Arapaho camp). Two others have the same subjects as known Soule images, but depict them in a different pose (two Arapaho girls and the Cheyenne or Arapaho woman). Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work. Three of the photographs in the composite are also included in the Wilson collection as individual cartes-de-visite--Asa Tongat (Item 227905), the Cheyenne man (Item 303271), and the Cheyenne woman (Item 303272).


Daughters of Stumbling Bear, Kiowa Indian

Daughters of Stumbling Bear, Kiowa Indian
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of two Kiowa girls, identified as daughters of the chief Stumbling Bear, was made by William P. Bliss in Indian Territory in the late 1870s. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss, as does the one other known example of the image.


Dodge City Cowboy Band on a round-up

Dodge City Cowboy Band on a round-up
Date: 1890s
View of men, some of whom are members of the Dodge City Cowboy Band, on a round-up in Indian Territory. Visible are a chuck wagon (with "L. N. York C.O.D." written on its canvas cover), men on horseback, dogs, the Dodge City Cowboy Band with their instruments, and a herd of cattle in the background.


First Cherokee Regiment day book

First Cherokee Regiment day book
Creator: Parks, Robert Calvin, d. 1864
Date: November 10, 1862-March 31, 1863
A semi-official journal covering the period Nov. 10, 1862-Mar. 31, 1863, during which time the author served with the 1st Cherokee Regiment (Confederate) in the Indian Territory under Colonel Stand Watie. It contains copies of general & local orders, movements of the unit, and events. Portions of the first few pages are missing. During the Civil War, most of the members of the Cherokee Nation who had been removed from Georgia to Oklahoma under the treaty of 1835 allied themselves with the Confederacy. The 1st Cherokee Regiment was organized in 1861. Robert Calvin Parks was a captain in Company B at the time he kept this day book. The regiment played an important role in several battles along the border of Indian Territory. References are made to Clara, Robert's wife; Sterling Price Parks, their son; Thomas J. (Jeff) Parks, Robert's brother; Aunt Susan Taylor, the wife of Richard Taylor, Robert's uncle & his mother's brother; the Riders & Albertys, relatives of Clara; and James Butler, husband of Robert's cousin and the man who shot & killed Robert.


Frizzle Head, Kiowa, in Indian Territory

Frizzle Head, Kiowa, in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card of Frizzle Head, a Kiowa, was made in Indian Territory in the late 1870s by William P. Bliss. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1875-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss.


General order no. 17

General order no. 17
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: April 5, 1869
General order no. 17, issued for one regiment of the 19th Kansas Cavalry, on Walnut Creek, Indian Territory, concerns the status of abandoned property.


General order no. 3. R. H. 2

General order no. 3. R. H. 2
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 3, 1869
Colonel Samuel Crawford of Fort Cobb, Indian Territory, issued this general order to discourage the seizure of Indian ponies by members of the 19th Cavalry.


General order no. 4. R. H. 2

General order no. 4. R. H. 2
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 11, 1869
Colonel Samuel Crawford, Camp No. 19 (possibly in Indian Territory) issues general order no. 4 concerning the care of the horses of the 19th Kansas Cavalry.


General order no. 5. R. H. 2

General order no. 5. R. H. 2
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 12, 1869
Colonel Samuel Crawford of Camp No. 19 (possibly Indian Territory) issues general order no. 5 commending several members of the 19th Kansas Cavalry for their neat and orderly appearance and excusing them from ground detail.


General order no. 6

General order no. 6
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 18, 1869
Colonel Samuel Crawford of Camp 20 (possibly Indian Territory), 19th Kansas Cavalry, issues general order no. 6 concerning the proper instruction of soldiers.


General order no. 7. R. H. 2

General order no. 7. R. H. 2
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 22, 1969
Colonel Samuel Crawford of the 19th Kansas Cavalry, at Camp 20 on Medicine Bluff Creek, Indian Territory, issues general order no. 7 announcing a general dismounted inspection of the regiment.


General order no. 8

General order no. 8
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: January 26, 1869
Colonel Samuel Crawford of the 19th Kansas Cavalry, at Medicine Bluff Creek, Indian Territory, issues general order no. 8 concerning the creation of morning reports for the regiment.


General order no. 9

General order no. 9
Creator: United States. Army. Kansas Cavalry Regiment, 19th (1868-1869)
Date: February 3, 1969
Colonel Samuel Crawford of the 19th Kansas Cavalry, at Medicine Bluff Creek, Indian Territory, issues general order no. 9 announcing a general inspection for the regiment.


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