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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Glenn Cunningham

Glenn Cunningham
Creator: D'Ambra, Duke
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
Glenn V. Cunningham, 1909-1988, one of the premiere milers in the 1930s, is shown running as a member of the University of Kansas track team. Born in Atlanta, Kansas, seven year old Cunningham and his thirteen year old brother, Floyd, received severe burns in a schoolhouse fire in 1917. Floyd died of his injuries two weeks later. Although Glenn's physician said he would never walk again, with rehabilitation and personal determination he recovered to become one of the nation's greatest milers. Between 1932 and 1934, Glenn won the Big Six indoor track titles and participated in the 1932 and 1936 Olympics. In 1938, Cunningham became the world's fastest miler as he set a new indoor record at Dartmouth College. In 1978, he was named the outstanding track performer in the 100-year history of Madison Square Garden, and, in 1979, he was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame.


Glenn Cunningham and Archie San Romani, Lawrence, Kansas

Glenn Cunningham and Archie San Romani, Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: D'Ambra, Duke
Date: 1938
A portrait of famed Kansas milers Glenn Cunningham, 1909-1988, and Archie San Romani, 1912-1994, crossing the finish line at the Kansas Relays at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. San Romani beat Cunningham in this race. Throughout San Romani's track career, he beat Cunningham 11 times. Up until 1930, the time barrier for the mile was considered to be four minutes and ten seconds. During the period from 1930 to 1940, that barrier was broken 18 times, and 11 of those new records were set by Kansans Glenn Cunningham with eight and Archie San Romani with three.


Glenn Cunningham and Bill Hargiss

Glenn Cunningham and Bill Hargiss
Creator: D'Ambra, Duke
Date: Between 1930 and 1933
This is a photograph showing Glenn Cunningham and University of Kansas track coach Bill Hargiss. Cunningham who grew up in Elkhart, Kansas, had several nicknames the Kansas Flyer, Elkhart Express and Iron Horse of Kansas. He earned the nicknames when he set world records for the mile. While attending school, his legs were very badly burned in a schoolhouse explosion which was caused when someone accidentally put gasoline instead of kerosene in a heating stove. Cunningham was eight and his brother Floyd was thirteen. Floyd died in the fire. When the doctors recommended amputating Glenn's legs, his parents would not allow the surgery. The doctors predicted he might never walk normally again; however, coupled with hours of a new type of therapy he gradually regained the ability to walk and to run. He attended the University of Kansas and ran on the track team. He competed in both the 1932 Summer Olympics as well as the 1936 Summer Olympics. While on the ship traveling from the U.S. to Germany, he was voted "Most Popular Athlete" by his fellow Olympians. Cunningham won the Sullivan medal in 1933 for his various running achievements in middle distance. In the 1932 Olympics he took 4th place in the 1500 meters, and in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he took silver in the 1500 meters. Cunningham won the Sullivan medal in 1933 for his various running achievements in middle distance. In 1934, he set the world record for the mile run at 4:06.8, which stood for three years. In 1936, he set the world record in the 800 meter run. In 1938, he set a world record in the indoor mile run of 4:04.4. He retired from competition in 1940.


Glenn Cunningham at a track meet possibly in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Glenn Cunningham at a track meet possibly in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Creator: Murphy, Peter F., Jr.
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
This is a photograph showing Glenn Cunningham at a track meet possibly in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The scars on his legs, caused by a rural school fire, are visible in the photograph.


Glenn Cunningham winning the Columbian Mile at Madison Square Garden

Glenn Cunningham winning the Columbian Mile at Madison Square Garden
Date: March 14, 1936
This is a photograph showing Glenn Cunningham winning the Columbian Mile in the K. of C. games at Madison Square Garden. Cunningham won by three yards over Gene Venzke, second, (center) and Joe Mangan, third. Glenn's time was 4:46.8.


Glenn Cunningham with several trophies and medals

Glenn Cunningham with several trophies and medals
Creator: Hixon Studio
Date: Between 1933 and 1934
This is a photograph showing Glenn Cunningham with some of his trophies and medals.


John Henry Kuck, Track and Field Olympian

John Henry Kuck, Track and Field Olympian
Date: Between 1926 and 1928
This black and white photograph shows Olympic champion John Henry Kuck, (1906-1986). Born in Wilson, Kansas, he set over a hundred records during his athletic career in the discus, javelin and shot put. Kuck held the national high school record in the shot put as a student at Wilson High School. He went on to a successful collegiate career at the Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas. In 1926, he became the national collegiate champion in the shot put and javelin. In addition to holding the world record in the shot put, Kuck was one of the first athletes to throw a 16-pound shot over 50 feet. He represented the United States in the 1928 summer Olympics held in the Netherlands where Kuck won the gold medal in the men's shot put. His wining throw broke the previous world record by 13 inches. After the Olympics, in 1929, Kuck became the assistant track and field coach at the University of Kansas. He later moved to Idaho to work in the timber and mining business. For sixteen years he also owned and operated a resort in the Idaho area before moving back to Wilson, Kansas, in October of 1972, with this wife Lida Cooper Wilson. On September 21, 1986, the state's first Olympic gold medallist and 1961 Kansas Sports Hall of Fame inductee passed away at the age of eighty-one in Wilson, Kansas.


Letter sweater

Letter sweater
Date: between 1930 and 1933
University of Kansas letter sweater. Man's wool, v-neck, long-sleeved, pullover sweater with a large blue "K" sewn to chest. Glenn Cunningham wore this sweater while attending the University of Kansas from 1930 to 1933. The sweater is most likely a letter sweater worn by athletes. Cunningham was one of the world's top middle distance runners in the 1930s. He was known as the "Kansas Ironman," as well as the "Elkhart Express" and the "Kansas Flyer." He was born in Atlanta, Kansas,and grew up in Elkhart, Kansas. In 1917, at age seven, he suffered severe burns to his legs in a schoolhouse fire and doctors told him that he would never walk again. Despite this prognosis, Cunningham became one of the premiere runners of the 1930s. He first came to national attention as a senior at Elkhart High School, where he won many state and national titles, including setting the world prep record for the mile at the National Interscholastic Meet. He then attended the University of Kansas, where he won six conference mile runs, two NCAA titles, and eight AAU national titles. He competed in the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles and placed fourth in the 1500M. In the 1936 Olympics he finished second to Jack Lovelock of New Zealand. In 1936 he also broke the world record for 800M. He broke the world record for the mile in 1934 and again in 1938. He also broke the indoor record for the 1500M and the mile seven times. Cunningham retired from racing in 1940.


Olympic track shoe

Olympic track shoe
Creator: Karhu (Finland)
Date: 1952
Red and white leather track shoe made by Karhu, a Finnish sports equipment company. Brown leather outsole with black composition heel. Six metal spikes protrude from bottom layer of toe sole. Wes Santee, an American middle distance track runner from Ashland, Kansas, wore this shoe while competing at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. Santee was a student at the University of Kansas at the time, and had held the world record in the mile race on multiple occasions when he competed at Helsinki.


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