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Education - Segregation and desegregation - William Reynolds v. Topeka Board of Education

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Douglas School in Topeka, Kansas

Douglas School in Topeka, Kansas
Date: May, 1902
A view of Douglas School, which was attended by African American students, located on Polk Street between 3rd and 4th Streets inTopeka, Kansas. The photograph was submitted to the Kansas Supreme Court as exhibit A in the case of William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka of the State of Kansas.


Douglas School in Topeka, Kansas

Douglas School in Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 1902
A view of Douglas School, which was attended by African American students, located on Polk Street between 3rd and 4th Streets in Topeka, Kansas. The photograph was submitted to the Kansas Supreme Court as exhibit A in William Reynolds vs The Board of Education of the City of Topeka of the State of Kansas.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions
Creator: Stark, J. M.
Date: September 6, 1902
Deposition taken for Kansas Supreme Court case William Reynolds, plaintiff v. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, defendant. John P. Rogers, Shawnee County Surveyor, was questioned about the elevation, slope, and drainage around the schools in question: Lowman Hill and Douglass. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1905
These set of records are depositions related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1905
These set of records are depositions related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, mandamuses

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, mandamuses
Creator: Burch, Rousseau Angelus, 1862-1944
Date: March 1903
Original proceedings in mandamus, writ denied, opinion of the Kansas State Supreme Court was written by Justice Burch. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceeding in mandamus

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceeding in mandamus
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: April 28, 1902
Proceeding in mandamus filed with the Kansas State Supreme Court. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceedings in mandamus

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceedings in mandamus
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1904
These records are proceedings in mandamus related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, stipulation

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, stipulation
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902
These set of records are stipulations related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds v. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, original proceeding in mandamus

William Reynolds v. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, original proceeding in mandamus
Creator: Wilson, W. H.
Date: May 1903
These records relate to the original proceedings in mandamus and return to alternative writ of mandamus, filed with the Kansas State Supreme Court. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


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