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Type of Material - Unpublished documents - Government records - Legislative - Legislative acts (bills, resolutions, memorials)

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An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: February 20, 1990
The Kansas Legislature passed Senate Bill 77 in 1990. Known as the "hard-40" bill, the bill allowed for a maximum forty-year prison sentence for persons convicted of premeditated murder. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. A strong supporter of capital punishment, Governor Mike Hayden signed the forty-year bill after efforts to pass a death penalty bill failed in the legislature. Kansas did not reinstate capital punishment until 1994.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: January 31, 1985-April 09, 1985
The Kansas Legislature passed H.B. 2135 on April 2, 1985. The bill proposed to reinstate capital punishment in Kansas. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. Governor John Carlin vetoed the bill, his fourth and final veto of a death penalty bill during his eight year administration. The legislature failed to override the veto. Kansas reinstituted capital punishment in 1994. The cover sheet recording legislative and gubernatorial action on the legislation is included with the vetoed bill.


An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto

An act concerning crimes and punishments and procedures relating thereto
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: April 22, 1994
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 2578 on April 8, 1994. The bill reinstated the death penalty for the crime of capital murder, as defined in the bill. In 1972, the U. S. Supreme Court decision in Furman v. Georgia overturned capital punishment laws in many states, including Kansas. The murder of 19 year old college student Stephanie Schmidt in 1993 prompted reinstatement of the law, ending 22 years of debate. Though opposed to capital punishment, Governor Joan Finney allowed the bill to become law without her signature, April 22, 1994. The absence of the governor's signature is apparent on the official enrolled version of the bill represented here.


An act relating to crimes and penalties

An act relating to crimes and penalties
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. This bill file includes several different versions of the bill. The final version of the bill prescribes the punishment of death or life imprisonment for persons convicted of first degree murder. The bill allows the jury trying the case to decide the form of punishment. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870. See also, "Punishment for Murder in the First and Second Degree," Laws of Kansas, 1935, Chapter 154.


An act relating to crimes punishable by death

An act relating to crimes punishable by death
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1935
With the capital punishment law repealed in 1907, the Kansas Legislature made several unsuccessful attempts at reinstatement in 1927, 1931, and 1933. In 1935, the legislature succeeded in reinstating the death penalty with House Bill 10. A companion bill, House Bill 11 (1935), prescribed hanging as the method for inflicting the death penalty in all cases. The bill also provided for the executioner, the time and place of execution, and cases of insanity, pregnancy, and escape. Although Kansas abolished the death penalty in 1907, no executions by state authority had occurred since 1870.


An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree

An act relating to kidnaping in the first degree
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1955
In 1955, the Kansas Legislature expanded the state's capital punishment law with Senate Bill 80 to include the crime of kidnapping. Since the death penalty was reinstated in Kansas in 1935, after its repeal in 1907, only persons convicted of first degree murder were eligible for execution. Senate Bill 80 limits the application of the death penalty to kidnappers who have harmed their captives, though in case of a jury trial the jury is to assign the punishment. While no state-authorized executions occurred in Kansas between 1870-1944, the state executed fifteen persons between 1944-1965.


An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901

An act to amend section 8, article 2, of chapter 31 of the general statues of 1901
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1907
The Kansas Legislature passed House Bill 66 by January 18 and Governor Edward W. Hoch signed the bill into law on January 30, 1907. The law abolished capital punishment in Kansas by prescribing life imprisonment, instead of the death penalty, as punishment for persons convicted of first degree murder. While executions by state authority were legal in Kansas from 1861-1907, the legislature imposed tighter regulations in 1872 that required the time of execution to be ordered by the governor. Kansas governors between 1872-1907 refused to issue execution orders, as required by law, effectively banning state authorized executions during that period. Governor Hoch was a strong opponent of capital punishment.


An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure

An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1872
Following the controversial, public execution of William Dickson in Leavenworth (1870), the state legislature passed Senate Bill 18 (1872) to regulate procedures for carrying out a death sentence. The act provides that the punishment of death must be by "hanging by the neck." The act also provides that the time of the execution must be ordered by the governor. In effect, this law imposed a ban on state executions since no governor ever ordered an execution between 1872-1907, the year the law was repealed. Dickson's execution would be the last conducted under state law for 73 years.


An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas

An act to repeal all poll tax laws in the state of Kansas
Creator: House of Representatives
Date: January 1913
This act was created by the Kansas House of Representatives in an attempt to do away with any poll taxing which required Kansas voters to pay a small fee before being able to cast their ballot. Poll taxing affected people of all races in Kansas. This act was not passed. Poll taxing continued in Kansas until the early 1960s when a federal amendment was passed which made poll taxing unconstitutional in all states.


Concurrent resolution amending the constitution of the state of Kansas

Concurrent resolution amending the constitution of the state of Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: February 18, 1867
This resolution by the Kansas state legislature calls for an election on an amendment to the state constitution supporting black male suffrage. If approved by the white male voters, the word "white" would be removed from the state constitution, particularly section one of article five, thereby allowing black males to vote. This amendment to the Kansas constitution was defeated. The issue became moot in 1870 with the ratification of the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which made it illegal to deny a citizen the right to vote because of "race, color, or previous condition of servitude."


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Educational Legislation

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Educational Legislation
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to educational legislation. Topics included in the correspondence but not limited to is higher education administration corruption, required length of school from primary to high school, and school fundraisers. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Kansas State Legislation

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Kansas State Legislation
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to the Kansas State Legislation. Topics included but not limited to in the file is state legislation appointments, taxation and disability pension. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, agricultural drainage legislation

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, agricultural drainage legislation
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to flood control and agricultural drainage. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, basic science legislation

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, basic science legislation
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929
This file includes subject correspondence relating to the pass or fail of the Basic Science Bill that focuses on chiropracters and non-medicinal practices. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, road legislation

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, road legislation
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to road legislation. Topics in the correspondence cover but is not limited to insterstate repairs and expansions, road funding, and state government control of highways. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


House Bill 602, Committee on Irrigation, Kansas Legislature

House Bill 602, Committee on Irrigation, Kansas Legislature
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1891
An act providing for and regulating the diversion appropriation, storage and distribution of waters in Kansas for industrial purposes within prescribed limits and the construction, maintenance, and operation of creating and providing for water districts.


House Concurrent Resolution No 48. Proposing amendment to the constitution

House Concurrent Resolution No 48. Proposing amendment to the constitution
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: February 13, 1867-February 14, 1867
Adopted by the House and approved by the Senate of the Kansas Legislature at Topeka, this resolution proposed to strike the word "Male" from section one, article five of the state constitution in support of woman suffrage. A public referendum of male voters ultimately defeated the amendment, but it attracted national attention and brought leading suffragists to campaign in the state. The resolution followed the state's ratification of the fourteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution and competed closely with a similar resolution proposing Negro suffrage.


International Brotherhood of Boilermakers and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of America and Governor Henry Allen correspondence

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of America and Governor Henry Allen correspondence
Creator: Allen, Henry Justin, 1868-1950
Date: January 5 - 11, 1920
In response to the proposed legislation for the Kansas Court of Industrial Relation or the "anti-strike law", the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers and Iron Ship Builders writes to Kansas Governor Allen, "we stand true to the dictations of our International Officers and should they order us to protest this legislation, should it be enacted, by striking, or by other means, we would not hesitate to obey their orders". Governor Allen responds by saying there are two classes of labor, one class is patient and so their interests will be considered and another class who likes to use intimidation, but he warns "...by strike nor by other means, shall we bow to the threat of violence and make the law the handmaiden of intimidation."


Ku Klux Klan bill

Ku Klux Klan bill
Creator: Johnson, Douglas
Date: 1925
Kansas state senator Douglas Johnson introduced Senate Bill No. 269 which was known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. By amending sections 17-501 and 17-503 of a 1923 revised Kansas statute, the bill would have allowed any foreign, charitable, or religious group to operate in Kansas without a state charter. Many Kansans opposed the bill on the grounds that it would have made it easier for the KKK to operate in the state. Governor Paulen opposed the bill and the house defeated its passing with 57 yes and 65 no. During the 1920s the Ku Klux Klan grew in numbers nationwide and enjoyed immense popularity.


Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, Act to Incorporate

Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, Act to Incorporate
Creator: Massachusetts. General Court
Date: April 26, 1854
The act of the Massachusetts legislature authorizing the creation of the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, the predecessor to the New England Emigrant Aid Company.


Proclomation

Proclomation
Creator: Allen, Henry Justin, 1868-1950
Date: June 9, 1919
Although women in Kansas already had the right to vote, Kansas Governor Henry J. Allen recalled the Kansas legislature for a special session in June of 1919 for the purpose of extending the U.S. constitutional right of equal suffrage to women.


Senate Concurrent Resolution no. 42 ratifying the Thirteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution abolishing slavery

Senate Concurrent Resolution no. 42 ratifying the Thirteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution abolishing slavery
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: February 7, 1865
The United States Congress proposed the Thirteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution on January 31, 1865, and the Kansas Legislature moved rapidly to ratify it. Senate Concurrent Resolution no. 42 was introduced on February 6th and the Committee On The Judiciary recommended passage as a concurrent resolution the morning of February 7th. The resolution then passed unanimously.


To the people of Kansas

To the people of Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Legislature. House of Representatives
Date: February 1893
This brief statement by the Kansas Republican House of Representatives, led by George Douglass, was written during the Populist War of 1893 in order to affirm that the Republican Party stood for "the supremacy of law and order against anarchy." During this "war," the state had two houses -- the Populist (Dunsmore) House and the Republican (Douglass) House -- both of which claimed to have been the legally elected House of Representatives for the state. Initially the two houses had conducted their business side by side in Representative Hall, but on February 13, 1893, the Populist Dunsmore House barricaded the hall and prevented the Republican congressmen from entering the chambers. The Republican Douglass house responded by attacking the doors of the hall with sledgehammers. Both sides stood at a standstill until February 25, when a decision from the Kansas Supreme Court stated that the Republican House was the legally elected representative body.


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