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Description of J. H. Kagi by E. R. Moffet

Description of J. H. Kagi by E. R. Moffet
Creator: Moffet, E. R.
Date: March 4, 1860
Apparently written for James Redpath and R. J. Hinton on March 4, 1860, this handwritten sketch of John H. Kagi is the reflection of long-time acquaintance E. R. Moffet, then of Davenport, Iowa. Moffet knew Kagi from the time the latter was two years old and became reacquainted with him in Kansas Territory. They spent time in "prison" together in October 1856 and in this somewhat odd manuscript, Moffet recreates some "Prison Scenes or Dialogue" and subsequently includes some correspondence from Kagi. Moffet recounts Kagi's second arrest, bail, and March 1857 altercation with Rush Elmore at Tecumseh, Kansas Territory.


Discharge papers, 1856

Discharge papers, 1856
Date: October 1, 1856
Discharge papers issued for Lieutenant John Henry Kagi (Kagey) of Company B, 2nd Reg't, Kansas Volunteers from the Kansas Free State Army.


J. H. Kagi to his father

J. H. Kagi to his father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: April 14, 1857
Having finally made and returned from his long-delayed trip to Nebraska City, Kagi writes his father from Lawrence, Kansas, where he had gone almost immediately "on business." Although he can't discuss the particulars for fear of "bribed P.M. [post master?] spies," Kagi makes some interesting observations about freestate "prospects" throughout the territory, which "look much more hopeful now than when I left." Kagi mentions some land investment opportunities and the expected arrival of Governor Robert Walker, who would not last long if he tried to enforce the "bogus laws."


J. H. Kagi to his sister

J. H. Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: June 8, 1859
From Cleveland, Ohio, Kagi jokingly writes his sister that, in the absence of any letters from the family, he fears they had set off for "Pikes Peak, and had died of suffering on the route, as others have." Kagi expects to leave in order to take up his "business in earnest" shortly--that is, to implement John Brown's plan and move on Harpers Ferry, Virginia.


J. H. Kagi to his sister

J. H. Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: March 5, 1858
On his 23rd birthday, March 5, 1858, Kagi (now identified by an alias "Maurice Maitland") writes a very circumspect letter to his sister from Springdale, Iowa, expressing his satisfaction with "the present political prospects"--"Every thing is working just to suit me--nothing could suit me better"--and his interest in knowing "what you have learned about J. H." (presumably, himself, J.H. Kagi).


J. H. Kagi to his sister

J. H. Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry, 1835-1859
Date: May 20, 1857
On May 20, 1857, Kagi writes his sister from Lawrence, Kansas, explaining that he has been sick with the measles for some time but is now just busy writing for the newspaper and "preparing laws for the Free State Legislature," which was scheduled to convene in June. "We shall try hard to put the State Government into operation."


J. H. Kagi to his sister

J. H. Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 27, 1857
On December 27 (or perhaps 29), Kagi writes to his sister from Springdale, Iowa, in the midst of "a very long & tedious journey." He informs her that his party would leave on the "cars" for Chicago soon, but cautions her "not for your life" to tell anyone where he was or what he was about, and tells her that he will soon be taking an assumed name. [According to historian Stephen Oates, "To Purge This Land With Blood," John Brown returned to Kansas in November, 1857, and enlisted Kagi and a few others in a new company, which set out in early December for Ohio and some additional training in preparation for Brown's planned assault on the "Slave Power in Virginia." On the way, around numerous campfires, Brown apparently encouraged and instructed his young recruits on the just nature of their cause, etc. As it turned out, the company wintered at Springdale while Brown went alone to Ohio.]


J. H. Kagi to his sister and father

J. H. Kagi to his sister and father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Kagi write that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi is confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."


J. H. Kagi to "My dear father"

J. H. Kagi to "My dear father"
Creator: Kagi, John Henry, 1835-1859
Date: March 3, 1857
Once again, from Topeka, Kagi wrote his father that his long planned trip to Nebraska City had to be delayed, this time because of high water on the "Kaw river" that "prohibited my crossing" and the state convention, which started in one week. On the positive side, he was still bothered by "the jarring of my head" (the blow inflicted by Elmore with his cane), his wound (gun shot) had nearly healed.


J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"

J. H. Kagi to "My dear sister"
Creator: Kagi, John Henry, 1835-1859
Date: February 13, 1857
On February 13, 1857, Kagi informed his sister in Bristol, Ohio, that he wouldn't be able to make the expected spring trip home afterall. He did plan to travel to Nebraska City for a few days, but because he was due to appear in court later in the spring, or lose the $8000 bail that had been posted for him, he didn't have time to journey east. He planned to be back in Topeka for the "Great Mass Convention" of freestate me on March 10. (See, Wilder, Annals of Kansas, 157)


John Henry Kagi to Adda

John Henry Kagi to Adda
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: May 15, 1858
John H. Kagi, one of John Brown's most trusted lieutenants, wrote from St. Catherine, Canada, to inform his friend, albeit in "figurative" language, about the change in their plans--"all depends upon caution."


John Henry Kagi to William A. Phillips

John Henry Kagi to William A. Phillips
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: February 7, 1859
One the back of this "original" letter, "W. A. P." (William A. Phillips) noted that it was written by John H. Kagi, a Brown lieutenant, "after taking the Negroes captured in Missouri near the southeast Kansas line. The last armed exploit of John Brown in Kansas."


John H. Kagi to his father

John H. Kagi to his father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 4, 1856
From Topeka, Kansas Territory, Kagi writes his father about his (Kagi's) personal situation and more generally about the civil war in Kansas Territory. Several thousand "armed Missourians" had been committing outrages against free state citizens with the support of proslave leaders--Wilson Shannon, Samuel Lecompte, and Daniel Woodson. Freestaters, according to Kagi, are just then mounting an effective defense of both Lawrence and Topeka, both primary targets of the proslavery forces.


John H. Kagi to his father

John H. Kagi to his father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: December 20, 1856
Released after three months from "prison" in Kansas Territory, John H. Kagi writes his father (who still resided in their native Ohio, but was then in Nebraska City, Nebraska) from Topeka, Kansas Territory. He describes the poor state of his health and finances, as well as politics and future plans. Kagi wants his father, and/or his father's money, in Kansas Territory as soon as possible.


John H. Kagi to his father

John H. Kagi to his father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: January 26, 1857
Kagi writes his father, who was still in Nebraska, regarding his continuing problems with proslavery officials in Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Kagi was arrested again (and quickly made bail). He was nearly killed by a mob while there "to report the proceedings" of the territorial legislature, which opened on January 12, 1857. This was the first legislature to meet in Lecompton. The second page of the letter is written on the back of a printed item "Appeal of Kansas to the Voters of the Free States" from the "Kansas Tribune,"


John H. Kagi to his sister

John H. Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry, 1835-1859
Date: January 4, 185[7]
From Topeka, Kansas Territory, shortly after the end of his imprisonment at Lecompton, John Kagi writes his sister in Bristol, Ohio, a mostly personal letter to say he is eager to return for a short visit, but, he writes, "I love Kansas dearer than ever, and feel more like laboring with my whole soul's strength for the triumph of her rights."


John Kagi to his sister

John Kagi to his sister
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: November 20, 1856
John Henry Kagi, sometimes known as Brown's "Secretary of War," is "in prison at Lecompton," Kansas Territory, when he writes this letter to his sister on November 20, 1856. Kagi, along with John Ritchie and several other free-state partisans, had been arrested by U.S. Marshal I. B. Donelson, supported by federal troops, on September 18 at Topeka, and subsequently charged with "highway robbery." (See, Kansas Historical Collections, 4:561) Although "in prison," Kagi assures his sister that he is safe and could be rescued at anytime; "I hesitate only because we may get out some other way, and because a forcible rescue would bring on a terrible winter war, which I do not wish to see." Kagi was killed during John Brown's Harpers Ferry raid in October, 1859.


Reception of John Brown & party at Grinnell, Iowa

Reception of John Brown & party at Grinnell, Iowa
Date: February 26, 1859
John Brown wrote these notes on the generous "Reception of Brown & Party at Grinnell, Iowa," where they were "kept for two days free of cost," re-supplied, and provided with significant cash for there journey north. Brown also mentioned friends at Tabor and "our reception among the Quaker Friends" at Sprindale, Iowa, on February 26.


Richard Realf to John Brown?

Richard Realf to John Brown?
Creator: Realf, Richard, 1834-1878
Date: May 31, 1858
The Englishman, Richard Realf, another of Brown's trusted followers, wrote to his "uncle" (John Brown?) from Cleveland, Ohio, regarding the threat of arrest that faced him and some of his associates (George Gill, John Kagi, et al), as well as the expenses they were incuring. He also was troubled by the news that certain people knew of certain of their activities, including "a certain Mr. Reynolds (colored) who attended our convention" and "has disclosed its objects to the members of a secret society (colored) called "The American Mysteries" or some other confounded humbug."


Showing 1 - 19

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