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Albert G. Boone to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Albert G. Boone to Thomas Nesbit Stinson
Creator: Boone, Albert G.
Date: January 16, 1860
Albert G. Boone, writing from Westport, Missouri, to Thomas N. Stinson, described his unsuccessful efforts to sell a printing press for Stinson. Boone suggested that Stinson contact "Free Statemen" with whom he was on good terms to see if they could help him sell it. Boone added a postscript to the letter asking about the prospects of a treaty with the Pottawatomie.


Albert Gallitin Boone

Albert Gallitin Boone
Date: Between 1880 and 1884
A full portrait of Col. Albert Gallitin Boone, who was the U.S. Indian Agent for the Cheyenne, Arapahoe, Kiowa, Comanche, and Plains Apache Indian tribes in 1859, 1860, and 1861. He was born in Greenup, Kentucky, in 1802, and died in Denver, Colorado, in 1884. He was a resident of Westport, Missouri, for many years. He was a grandson of Daniel Boone,


Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman

Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: October 06, 1855
In this letter to John A. Haldeman, Andrew H. Reeder informs Haldeman that he has been told that "a new assessment of $5 per share to pay for a Wyandot float of 640 acres has been laid on the town of Tecumseh."


Daniel Boone to W.W. Cone

Daniel Boone to W.W. Cone
Creator: Boone, Daniel Morgan III
Date: August 11, 1879
In this item, Daniel Boone, grandson of pioneer frontiersman Daniel Boone, relates details of his early life in Kansas to W.W. Cole. Boone explains that his family lived just beyond the line that marked one edge of the Delaware Agency, and near to an area of land set aside for "halfbreeds."


Ephraim Nute to [Unidentified recipient]

Ephraim Nute to [Unidentified recipient]
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 14, 1859
Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence on February 14, 1859, regarding "the disaster that befel the last expedition from this place with fugitives." The party, led by Dr. John Doy, was in route to Oskaloosa when captured and taken to Missouri, where "the colored people, both free and slaves, have been shipped for the New Orleans market." Doy and his son had been jailed at Platte City, Missouri, and were to be tried for "stealing a slave from Weston." Nute was quite sure this operation had been betrayed from within, as "Great rewards were offered, spies sent out & men hired in this place to watch & aid in recovering the run away property."


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: December 8, 1855 - December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Westport, Missouri to his wife as he received new information concerning the Wakarusa War at Lawrence. Hill was frustrated by these reports, which conflicted and were from the proslavery perspective, and which concerned the number of free state and proslavery soldiers, the status of the war, and government action taken to prevent conflict. Hill was also troubled by shameless "traveling and drinking and swearing" and gunshots on the Sabbath. The last page of the letter expresses his relief at news of peace in Lawrence, where he would learn "the other syde of the story" upon arrival. The murder of Thomas W. Barber, who rode outside Lawrence and was shot by a proslavery supporter on December 6th, was mentioned. Hill also described an eventful stagecoach journey.


History of Kansas and emigrant's guide

History of Kansas and emigrant's guide
Creator: Chapman, J. Butler
Date: 1855
The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery." Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.


James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson
Creator: Hunter, James M.
Date: December 5, 1854
James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.


John Doy to Strong

John Doy to Strong
Creator: Doy, John, b. 1812
Date: October 19, 1854
John Doy, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to a Mr. Strong, described an incident in which a Westport, Missouri, man charged him extra money for notary services because he "was a Yankee."


No-tin-no to D. D. Mitchell

No-tin-no to D. D. Mitchell
Creator: No-tin-no
Date: October 4, 1843
No-tin-no, a leader of the Ottawa nation, wrote this letter to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, D. D. Mitchell, concerning a shipment of farming implements that the government had promised to the tribe. The Ottawa were frustrated by the delay, and No-tin-no stated that if he did not hear back from Mitchell, he would write to the President of the United States himself. The letter was dictated to Jotham Meeker, a missionary and printer at the Ottawa Baptist Mission near present-day Ottawa, Kansas.


Reminiscences of Pioneer Days

Reminiscences of Pioneer Days
Creator: Harris, Nelly McCoy
Date: January 01, 1916
These reminiscences tell the early history of Kansas City, Kansas and Missouri as written by Mrs. Nelly McCoy Harris. The stories were published in Kansas City newspapers.


Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek
Creator: Stewart, John E.
Date: c. 1856 or 1857
This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.


Silas Armstrong to John M. Armstrong

Silas Armstrong to John M. Armstrong
Creator: Armstrong, Silas
Date: February 18, 1846
In this letter to his brother John M. Armstrong, Silas Armstrong discusses happenings among the Wyandotts while John was in Washington City on business. In particular, Silas explains that William Walker had recently undertaken certain actions while citing the fact that John "as a delegator had not done it and probably would not do it." Silas warns John "to watch and be on your guard."


Standee

Standee
Date: 2016
Standee advertising the 2016 movie "Nuts!", a documentary feature film by Penny Lane that uses a combination of historical footage, interviews, and hand-drawn animated re-enactments to tell the story of the rise and fall of Dr. James R. Brinkley. The standee features a cartoon illustration of Dr. Brinkley standing outside the Milford city limits holding a goat in his arms. There is an oval cutout at the goat's face, allowing people to stand behind the standee and pose for pictures. This standee was on display in the lobby of Tivoli Cinemas in Kansas City, Missouri for the film's run that began on July 1, 2016.


Tales of an Old Timer

Tales of an Old Timer
Creator: McCoy, John Calvin, 1811-1889
Date: November 25, 1916
Tales of an Old Timer, containing early reminiscences, stories and sketches of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas by John Calvin McCoy and compiled by W. W. Harris, Jr.


Topographic map of the road from Missouri to Oregon

Topographic map of the road from Missouri to Oregon
Creator: E. Weber & Co.
Date: 1846
Part one of an Oregon Trail map compiled by Charles Preuss and based on the field notes and journal of John C. Frémont. It is the first of seven maps bound together in a booklet and submitted to the U.S. Congress as a report. This page follows the Kansas and Little Blue rivers into present-day Nebraska. Recorded on the map are the route of the Santa Fe Trail, good places for drinking water, and locations where elk and deer are scarce. Map maker Charles Preuss worked as Frémont's assistant on the expedition, producing sketches and notes that he later used to create this series of maps.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 7, Correspondence

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 7, Correspondence
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1839-1845
Correspondence sent from the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. The Superintendents of Indian Affairs during this period were Joshua Pilcher, David D. Mitchell, and Thomas H. Harvey. Their correspondence with Indian agents and sub-agencies concerned the disbursement of allotments and annuities, the settling of expenses and treaty stipulations, and the nominations of blacksmiths, interpreters, and farmers for several tribes. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.


Westport and Big Blue

Westport and Big Blue
Creator: Davis, George
Date: October 22, 1864-October 23, 1864
This is a map showing the Battle of Westport and Big Blue. It accompanied a report by Major General S. R. Curtis, U. S. Army and was copied from the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-1865, War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Vol. XLI, Part 1.


William Brown to Sarah Brown

William Brown to Sarah Brown
Creator: Brown, William
Date: October 26, 1864
This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a "disgrace to Kansas." William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the "rebel" troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.


William E. Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow

William E. Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow
Creator: Goodnow, William Eaton, 1807-1876
Date: November 22, 1855
William Goodnow, recently arrived in Shannon, Kansas Territory, wrote to his wife, Harriet, who had remained in New England. Goodnow related his experiences traveling from Westport, Missouri, where he received quality hospitality from a slaveholder, to Lawrence, and finally to Shannon, where he met his brother, Isaac, and sister-in law. Goodnow also mentioned his recent subscription to the Herald of Freedom newspaper, which would be sent to her; he implored her to save all of them, as he wished them preserved. He added that they expected a rush of emigrants in the following spring.


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