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First called the Methodist Indian Mission

First called the Methodist Indian Mission
Creator: Connelley, William Elsey, 1855-1930
Date: March 08, 1921
This item, written by William Elsey Connelley of the Kansas State Historical Society, covers some of the history of the Methodist Indian Mission which was later known as the Indian Manual Training School and finally, the Shawnee Mission.


James L. McDowell correspondence

James L. McDowell correspondence
Date: 1860-1892
This item contains letters to James L. McDowell. Correspondents include Edmund G. Ross, Alexander Caldwell, Thomas Carney, Senator Preston Plumb, General Thomas Ewing, members and staff of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, individuals working for the Kansas State Fair Association, staff of the Department of the Interior - General Land Office, and others. The letters from Thomas Carney focus on topics such as the Fugitive Slave Law, the Kansas militia, and Missouri border trouble. McDowell held a number of public positions in his lifetime, from notary public to city mayor to U.S. Marshal and major-general of the Kansas militia (including organizing to defend the state during Price's Raid in 1864) to postmaster for Leavenworth. He was also actively interested in agriculture, helping to organize the first and later state fairs for Kansas.


Lecompton constitutional convention delegates correspondence

Lecompton constitutional convention delegates correspondence
Date: 1858
Correspondence pertaining to the Lecompton Constitutional Convention delegates. A letter from Thomas Ewing, Jr. to Kansas Governor James W. Denver is included. A searchable transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Sherman, Ewing and McCook Attornies at Law to Mess Walker

Sherman, Ewing and McCook Attornies at Law to Mess Walker
Creator: Sherman, Ewing & McCook
Date: January 14, 1858
A letter to Mess Walker, Williams & Miller, of Weston Missouri, regarding the payment of a debt that should be paid promptly to the firm of Sherman, Ewing & McCook, Attorneys at Law.


Thomas C. Stevens correspondence

Thomas C. Stevens correspondence
Date: 1861-1864
These letters, telegrams, and other business and political/military correspondence involve Thomas C. Stevens or Governor Thomas Carney. Carney and Stevens had opened the first wholesale house in Leavenworth together in the spring of 1858. This collection contains many of Governor Carney's personal papers, not found in his administration records collection. In two letters, dated September 3, 1863, Major General John McAllister Schofield, commander of the Department of the Missouri for the Union Army, writes to Governor Carney accepting the services of the Kansas militia to help protect border towns. He also announces his intentions to "publish an order prohibiting all armed men, not in the service of the United States from passing the Missouri line." This correspondence also includes a number of telegrams that Governor Carney received from various individuals. Thomas Ewing Jr., commander of the District of the Border, wrote to Carney on August 27, 1863 asking him to use his influence to prevent a raid into Missouri in retaliation for Quantrill's Raid. Samuel R. Curtis, commander of the Army of the Border, wrote to Carney on June 7, 1864 reporting on bushwhackers and hostile Indians.


Thomas Ewing, Jr.

Thomas Ewing, Jr.
Creator: Brady's National Portrait Galleries
This carte-de-visite shows Thomas Ewing, Jr., (1829-1896). A native of Ohio he migrated to the Kansas Territory in 1856 to practice law in Leavenworth, Kansas. As a supporter of the free state party Ewing became a delegate in 1858 to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. In 1861 he was appointed as the state of Kansas' first chief justice of the supreme court. With the outbreak of the Civil War Ewing enlisted in the Union army and became colonel of the Eleventh Kansas infantry regiment. He rose through the ranks to brigadier general and to breveted major general before mustering out of service in 1865. After the war Ewing became active in the Greenback wing of the Democrat party and served in the United States house of representatives from the state of Ohio. On January 21,1896 Ewing passed away at the age of sixty-seven from injuries received in a street car accident in New York City.


Thomas Ewing, Jr.

Thomas Ewing, Jr.
Creator: Brady, Mathew B., 1823 (ca.)-1896
Date: Between 1860 and 1865
The black and white photograph shows Thomas Ewing, Jr., 1829-1896, in a military uniform. A native of Ohio he migrated to the Kansas Territory in 1856 to practice law in Leavenworth, Kansas. As a supporter of the free state party, Ewing became a delegate in 1858 to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. In 1861, he was appointed as the state of Kansas' first chief justice of the supreme court. With the outbreak of the Civil War Ewing enlisted in the Union army and became a colonel of the Eleventh Kansas infantry regiment. He rose through the ranks to brigadier general and to breveted major general before mustering out of service in 1865. After the war Ewing became active in the Greenback wing of the Democrat party and served in the United States house of representatives from the state of Ohio. On January 21, 1896 Ewing passed away at the age of sixty-seven from injuries received in a street car accident in New York City.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Dear Sir

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Dear Sir
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: March 29, 1858
In this letter from Leavenworth, Ewing began with comments on a note that was being extended and ended with observations about his city's rapid growth and bright prospects. "Majors & Russell," he predicted, "will only start a portion of their trains from Nebraska City. They will do all their business here as far as the capacity of the town & neighborhood will permit."


Thomas Ewing Jr. to E. Peabody

Thomas Ewing Jr. to E. Peabody
Date: April 9, 1859
Although Thomas Ewing, Jr. was heavily involved in the promotion and development of the Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company with his arrival in Kansas Territory, this seems to be one of the few letters in the letter press books containing fairly substantial references to those concerns up to that date. Here, Ewing wrote E. Peabody of St. Louis, Missouri, regarding a recent company board meeting in Leavenworth, Kansas, and plans to "connect with the Hannibal & St Jos: rail road, by the shortest & cheapest route to Bucklin or Easton," bypassing Platte City and Plattesburgh.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Judge M. F. Moore

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Judge M. F. Moore
Date: June 5, 1857
Letter Press Book of Thomas Ewing, Jr. He moved to Kansas Territory in 1856 and established a law practice in Leavenworth. It is from this town, Kansas Territory's largest city, where he also had many investments, that he wrote Judge M. F. Moore, Sioux City, Iowa, regarding Moore's investments and other opportunities in Leavenworth.


Thomas Ewing Jr. to Milton Fithion

Thomas Ewing Jr. to Milton Fithion
Date: March 14, 1859
After spending the winter in Washington conducting railroad business, Thomas Ewing Jr. wrote to Milton Fithion of Urbana, Ohio, regarding payment for a Wyandot float, but was informed that N. Z. McCulloch (or Tom-a-no-na) is not named in any of the Wyandot treaties as entitled to land, and that therefore his claim is valueless.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.
Date: July 14, 1857
Writing to his father from Leavenworth, K.T., Thomas Ewing, Jr., described the prospects for "good bargains" in Delaware lands. "Hamp" went to secure 1,000 acres for Ewing, Sr., which they hoped to acquire for $3.00 per acre. Ewing, Jr., addressed additional transactions that he was considering for his father and others.


Thomas Ewing, Jr. to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Thomas Ewing, Jr. to Thomas Ewing, Sr.
Date: August 5, 1857
The first letter in this letter press book concerns political affairs in the territory. The letter is addressed to Thomas Ewing, Sr., in Lancaster, Ohio, and dated Leavenworth, Kansas, August 5, 1857. Responding to his father's observations about the situation in Kansas, Ewing, Jr., wrote "I have all along regarded the attempt at an organization of a State Government, while we are a Territory, as the extreme of folly . . ." and some additional observations about the Topeka movement. Ewing "intend[ed] to stand clear of the political arena in Kansas while the leaders of the Democracy are made up of political murderers, and while the free state party is but the football for the Free soilers in the Northern States."


Thomas Ewing to Dear Sir

Thomas Ewing to Dear Sir
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: July 14, 1857
Accompanying a two page, mostly illegible letter from Thomas Ewing letter press book dated Leavenworth, July 14, 1857, was a two page addendum describing and itemizing the cost of building 40 new and reconstructing the roofs on 27 previously built houses in Leavenworth--total cost, $8,990. He also provided an estimate as to rent that could be expected on these properties and on "a two story brick building, such as you spoke of building on the corner of 4 & Delaware."


W.T. Sherman, Thomas Ewing, & McCook, to George B. Parker

W.T. Sherman, Thomas Ewing, & McCook, to George B. Parker
Creator: Sherman, Ewing & McCook
Date: April 4, 1859
Although unclear as to the exact nature of the litigation, this letter from the Leavenworth firm pertained to the taking of depositions in "the case against the steamboat Isabella". The Isabella was a side-wheeler which made regular runs to Sioux City during 1858, and in this case apparently came to the aid of the Kate Howard when ice forced her to "give up her trip".


W.T. Sherman to James B. Goddard

W.T. Sherman to James B. Goddard
Creator: Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891
Date: January 17, 1859
From Leavenworth, Kansas, W.T. Sherman wrote to a correspondent in Louisville, Ohio, regarding the uncertain prospects of "the Gold Mines of Kansas". He speculated that the Pikes Peak mines would yield some gold but nothing like the mines of California and Australia, and offered some travel advice.


W.T. Sherman to Robert Campbell

W.T. Sherman to Robert Campbell
Creator: Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891
Date: January 17, 1858
A letter to Robert Campbell regarding the debt that Sherman, Ewing & McCook were trying to collect. As with similar correspondence, this letter conveys a sense of the legal and financial transactions that played a major part in the firm's business activities in the territory.


William Brown to Sarah Brown

William Brown to Sarah Brown
Creator: Brown, William
Date: February 7, 1865
This letter, written by William Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William began by summarizing an editorial entitled "A Military Quartette" that he said appeared in the Leavenworth Conservative newspaper the previous night. The editorial discussed the distinguished Civil War records of four partners of the Leavenworth law practice Ewing, Sherman, & McCook. William went on to discuss his position as a clerk at the state legislature and life in Topeka.


William D. Blackford to H.W. Farnsworth correspondence

William D. Blackford to H.W. Farnsworth correspondence
Creator: Blackford, W.D.
Date: January 29, 1870-March 26, 1872
These items, consisting of a series of letters written to H.W. Farnsworth by attorney William D. Blackford, deal with Indian Depredation claims that originated in Kansas. The letters address the many difficulties related to such claims, which were largely seen at the time as the responsibility of either the federal or state government.


William Tecumseh Sherman

William Tecumseh Sherman
Creator: Kuhn Bros.
Date: 1886
This is a photograph of William Tecumseh Sherman who was a partner, with his brother-in-law, Thomas Ewing, Jr, in the law firm Sherman, Ewing and McCook in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. Sherman came to Leavenworth in September 1858 and he left 14 months later in 1859 to take a position at a military school in Louisiana. The military school was forerunner of what is now Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge. Later, Sherman gained fame as a Union general in the Civil War (1861-1865).


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