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All hail prohibition!!

All hail prohibition!!
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: Between 1881 and 1913
An envelope with a poem printed on its front side. The poem, by J.L. Eldridge of Topeka, Kansas, centers on prohibition, the "only legal method that can suppress the liquor traffic." Eldridge states that the enactment and enforcement of prohibition will close many places that sell liquor and should bring much needed prosperity to the country.


Campaign songs, ancedotes and speeches

Campaign songs, ancedotes and speeches
Creator: Judd, Charles Pratt, 1840-
Date: 1892
This People's Party songster including campaign songs, anecdotes and speeches used at political rallies.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 28, 1861
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.


Drawing by Myron A. Waterman

Drawing by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Pen and ink drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of an illuminated letter "S" with a woman in profile wearing pince-nez glasses. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawing by Myron A. Waterman

Drawing by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of a woman walking alone towards a copse of trees in the distance. Proof of an illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawing by Myron A. Waterman

Drawing by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of an older bearded man in profile. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawing by Myron A. Waterman

Drawing by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of a man with a beard but no mustache. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawing by Myron A. Waterman

Drawing by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: between 1890 and 1920
Pen and ink drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of a child's face. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawings by Myron A. Waterman

Drawings by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Paper with five separate small proof prints of drawings by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937). Left to right, the top row has a church and a scene of a woman walking in a field. The bottom row has an illuminated initial "A" with waves, an illuminated initial "S" with a woman in profile, and a portrait of a bearded man in profile. Test prints for illustrations accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poems "The Organist" and "A Dream of the Sea" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawings by Myron A. Waterman

Drawings by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Proof print of a drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of child with a finger in his mouth. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawings by Myron A. Waterman

Drawings by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Pen and ink drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of child crawling on the floor. Study for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." See 2012.78.6 for the final proof. Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Drawings by Myron A. Waterman

Drawings by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: 1893
Proof print of a drawing by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of child wearing patched clothes crawling on the floor. Proof for a illustration accompanying Albert Bigelow Paine's poem "The Organist" in the 1893 compilation by Paine and William Allen White titled "Rhymes by Two Friends." Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Eva Jessye

Eva Jessye
Creator: Kalmbach, Bob
Date: Between 1960 and 1969
Eva Jessye singing at the University of Michigan. Jessye, a Coffeyville native, was the first chorale director of stage shows such as Porgy and Bess, and of the first black musical motion picture Hallelujah. As founder of the Eva Jessye Choir, she became the female dean of black music in America.


Eva Jessye

Eva Jessye
Date: Between 1940 and 1950
Five views of Eva Jessye in costume. Jessye, a Coffeyville native, was the first choral director of stage shows such as Porgy and Bess, and of the first black musical motion picture Hallelujah. As founder of the Eva Jessye Choir, she became the female dean of black music in America.


Eva Jessye and Eleanor Roosevelt

Eva Jessye and Eleanor Roosevelt
Date: Between 1940 and 1945
Eleanor Roosevelt shaking hands with Eva Jessye.


Hurrah for prohibition

Hurrah for prohibition
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: Between 1881 and 1913
An envelope with a poem printed on its front side. The poem, by J.L. Edridge of Topeka, Kansas, centers on prohibition and the effect it has had on Kansas. On the back of the envelope is a short explanation of Eldridge's views on prohibition and his opposition to liquor license laws.


John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Date: c. 1860
Portrait of John Greenleaf Whittier, poet and Free-State supporter. In September, 1858, he published a poem in the Atlantic Monthly titled "Le marais Du Cygne", telling the story of the Marais des Cygnes massacre.


John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
Date: Possibly between 1870 and 1892
A portrait of Quaker poet, John Greenleaf Whittier.


Kansas Day for Kansas schools

Kansas Day for Kansas schools
Creator: Copley, L. G. A.
Date: 1882
A brochure of information and exercises for use in every Kansas school containing Kansas history, geography, poems, songs, and politics together with excerpts from the state constitution and a list of Kansas "firsts." Designed especially for January 29th.


Kansas Weekly Herald

Kansas Weekly Herald
Date: January 1, 1855
Carriers Address to the patrons of the Kansas Weekly Herald.


Lines on the first psalm

Lines on the first psalm
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: June 9, 1896
A poem written by J.L. Eldridge of Topeka, Kansas, centering on Biblical gospel.


Politcal cartoon by Myron A. Waterman

Politcal cartoon by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Alice Gertrude (Sheldon)
Date: between 1897 and 1920
Hand-drawn political cartoon by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937) of a preacher sweating at a lectern in a church decorated with dollar signs. On the reverse is a pro-temperance poem by Alice Sheldon Waterman (1862-1925), Myron's wife and sister to Reverend Charles Monroe Sheldon. Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Prohibition

Prohibition
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: Between 1881 and 1913
Lines, a poem written by J.L. Eldridge, makes reference to a drunken father who killed his five year old son in Toledo, Ohio, and how the enactment and enforcement of prohibition may prevent similar situations in the future. The leaflet also includes advice from Eldridge to the opponents of prohibition along with encouraging words to his friends.


"The Freeman's Song" and "The Kansas Emigrant Song" lyrics

"The Freeman's Song" and "The Kansas Emigrant Song" lyrics
Creator: Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892
Date: 1854
These printed lyric sheets provide the words to "The Freeman's Song," which conveyed an anti-slavery message and to "The Kansas Emigrant Song" about the need for free state emigrants to populate the West.


"The Prairie Star," Vol. 1, No. 7

"The Prairie Star," Vol. 1, No. 7
Creator: Kansas Philomathic Institute
Date: March 7, 1857
"The Prairie Star" was a weekly, handwritten, literary publication produced from January through April, 1857, by the Topeka-based Kansas Philomathic Institute (also known as the Philomathic Literary Society). The literary club, which included male and female members, met weekly to read essays and poems aloud, which were then collected, recopied, and published as "The Prairie Star." Maria M. Martin, wife of Dr. Samuel E. Martin, edited the paper.


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