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Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 5, 1858
Lawrence writes from Boston, Massachusetts, on March 5, 1858, to introduce W. D. Goddard, "an ardent free state man" who wished "to live and die in Kansas."


Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott

Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 20, 1855
Amos A. Lawrence wrote from Boston to James Abbott in Hartford, Connecticut, referring to a recent shipment of carbine rifles he had sent, which was "far from being enough." Lawrence advised Abbott to take good care of them, as they might be used as reimbursement to those investors who had subscribed money to the free state cause once "it is settled that Kanzas shall not be a province of Missouri."


Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott

Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 24, 1855
Amos A. Lawrence wrote from Boston to James B. Abbott in Hartford, Connecticut, to confirm his receipt of a shipment of rifles. Lawrence advised Abbott that at least half of them would be required by free state forces in Topeka.


Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott

Amos A. Lawrence to James B. Abbott
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: August 11, 1855
Amos A. Lawrence wrote from Boston to James Abbott in Hartford, Conneticut, with shipping instructions for the 100 Sharps rifles he would procure. Lawrence requested that they be "packed in casks like hardware" and that Abbott bill him for expenses incurred.


Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown

Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 20, 1857
While John Brown was touring the East in March of 1857 he received this letter from Amos Lawrence, Boston, who informed Brown that he (Lawrence) had recently "sent to Kansas near $14,000 to establish a fund" for the support of common and secondary schools. As a result, Lawrence wrote he was short of cash and could not give Brown what he had requested. Nevertheless, "in case anything shd occur while you are engaged in a great & good to shorten yr life, you may be assured that yr wife and children shall be cared for more liberally than you now propose."


Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown

Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: February 19, 1857
Amos Lawrence, Boston, sent John Brown $70 which had been donated by the people of East Jaffrey, New Hampshire, for Brown's "own personal use, & not for the cause in any other way than that. Lawrence did not believe Brown would receive much financial support from the National Kansas Committee: "the old managers have not inspired confidence, & therefore money will be hard for them to get now & hereafter."


An invitation to an address written by Ralph Waldo Emerson

An invitation to an address written by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Creator: Channing, William F.
Date: November 8, 1856
A printed invitation issued by William F. Channing in repsonse to an address delivered by Ralph Waldo Emerson on the topic of aid to the sufferers in Kansas. This address was given at the Tremont Temple in Boston, Massachusetts, and sponsored by the Young Men's Kansas Relief Society.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company stock certificate

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company stock certificate
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad Company
Date: 1883
This is an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company stock certificate. At the monthly director's meeting held, August 7, 1883, in Boston, MA, they approved issuing certificates of stock from number A.1 issued August 1, 1883, forward. The directors decided that certificates would be signed by the Assistant Secretary, countersigned by the Assistant Treasurer, and certified across the left end by the Comptroller. The shares were valued at $100 each and they were issued in the State of Kansas.


Boston Corbett's personal documents

Boston Corbett's personal documents
Date: 1855-1886
Personal documents belonging to Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett, the man who killed John Wilkes Booth following President Lincoln's assassination. Corbett moved to Kansas in 1878 and lived in a dugout near Concordia, Kansas. In 1887, Corbett was given the position of assistant doorkeeper for the Kansas House of Representatives in Topeka. However, when he brandished his pistol during a session of the legislative that same year, he was arrested and sent to an insane asylum. In 1888, he escaped and his whereabouts remained unknown until his presumed death. Documents include his Y.M.C.A. membership cards, signed checks, baptism certificate, a hatmaker's traveling card, and his naturalization certificate dated June 19, 1855.


Boston Red Sox baseball team

Boston Red Sox baseball team
Date: Between 1926 and 1927
This is a photograph of the Boston Red Sox major league baseball team in either 1926 or 1927. Among those pictured is Kansan Del Lundgren, a right-handed pitcher from Lindsborg (seated on the far left in the front row). The only other person identified in the photo is baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who is standing in the center in the light-colored suit. Del Lundgren appeared in 56 major league games, including 48 games with the Red Sox in 1926-27 and eight games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1924. His major league record was 5-15, with an ERA of 6.51. In addition to his major league career, Lundgren pitched in 202 minor league games for four different teams, including the Salina Millers, Birmingham Barons, Nashville Volunteers, and Minneapolis Millers. Altogether, Lundgren's professional baseball career spanned the period 1922-1930.


Capretio

Capretio
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Around 1866
A manuscript copy of a guitar solo titled "Capretio" by Henry Worrall. Worrall published his solo guitar instrumental "Capretio on a Mexican Air" about 1866 with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. The copyright of this piece was credited to J.L. Peters and Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. Worrall's manuscript copy of his "Capretio" [presented here] may date from an earlier or later period. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Charles A. Foster, statement about John Brown

Charles A. Foster, statement about John Brown
Creator: Foster, Charles A.
Date: July 12, 1860
Signed C. A. Foster, Boston, July 12, 1860, this brief statement asserts that John Brown "was not present" at the Pottawatomie Massacre, "but that he knew that it was going to be done" and "he approved it."


Charles H. Branscomb to John Brown

Charles H. Branscomb to John Brown
Creator: Branscomb, Charles H.
Date: September 22, 1856
From Boston, Massachusetts, Charles Branscomb wrote Brown a brief note conveying "fifty or one hundred dolls as a testimonial" from those who admired Brown's "conduct during the war."


Charles H. Branscomb to Martin Brimmer

Charles H. Branscomb to Martin Brimmer
Creator: Branscomb, Charles H.
Date: April 12, 1858
Charles H. Branscomb, a former general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence to Martin Brimmer, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee. Branscomb defended his performance as general agent for the company and expressed his surprise at having been asked to resign his position.


Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence

Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: November 15, 1860
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from a town of Medford, presumably in New England, to Amos A. Lawrence in Boston regarding relief efforts for Kansas. Robinson discussed the formation of a committee at Lawrence, which would "ascertain the objects of charity & minister to their necessities." He also described other relief efforts being carried out at the local level, which Robinson believed to be more effective than using nonresident disbursing agents or traveling solicitors.


Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale

Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: April 7, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 25, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Boston, Massachusetts, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about attending Octoroon, a play about slavery, and his feelings for the "infernal institution of slavery." Robinson thinks the play conveys a true picture of conditions in the South. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Circular by various Protestant ministers on behalf of the activities of the New England Emigrant Aid Company

Circular by various Protestant ministers on behalf of the activities of the New England Emigrant Aid Company
Creator: Stowe, C. E. (Calvin Ellis), 1802-1886
This printed circular indicated that nineteen Protestant ministers in the Boston area were urging emigration to Kansas under the auspices of the New England Emigrant Aid Company because the ministers listed believed "that no christian work demanded effort more than the work for peopling Kanzas with men and women who were resolved to make it free." The ministers proposed to raise $60,000 to aid emigration efforts. The document listed four areas of interest to the emigrant aid company--freedom, religion, education, and temperance. All nineteen ministers were listed in the document that was signed by Calvin E. Stowe, Andover; Edward E. Hale, Worcester; and Thomas J. Gaffield, Boston.


Commissioning of the U.S.S. Oregon City at Boston, Massachusetts

Commissioning of the U.S.S. Oregon City at Boston, Massachusetts
Date: February 15, 1946
Here are two photographs showing the commissioning of the U.S.S. Oregon City at Boston, Massachusetts.


E. Brigham to John Brown

E. Brigham to John Brown
Creator: Brigham, E.
Date: March 9, 1857
In this letter of support from Boston, March 9, 1857, Brigham told Brown how he had been moved by the "touching appeal" in the New York Tribune of March 4 and assured Brown he had done as much as he could, considering his present economic condition, for Kansas. But he goes on to comment on the importance of the free state cause to New Englanders, who really weren't doing all they could or should do to help.


E.C. Thayer to Dr. J.W. McIntosh correspondence

E.C. Thayer to Dr. J.W. McIntosh correspondence
Creator: Thayer, E.C.
Date: January 18, 1896
In this letter to Dr. J.W. McIntosh, E.C.Thayer discusses the character of James Murie, Pawnee breastworks, and tensions and conflicts betweeen the Pawnees, Omahas, and Sioux.


Edmund Burke Whitman to Franklin B. Sanborn

Edmund Burke Whitman to Franklin B. Sanborn
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: November 15, 1860
In this typically long letter/report to Franklin Sanborn in Boston, Whitman wrote from Lawrence on November 15, 1860, regarding the difficult situation facing Kansas settlers/farmers as another winter approached--as "the stock of old corn is exhausted and the grass fails, the prospect is dreary enough and without aid from abroad in some form to supply bread stuffs many of our people must suffer severely for want of food."


Elmer Ernest Southard correspondence

Elmer Ernest Southard correspondence
Creator: Southard, Elmer Ernest, 1876-1920
Date: 1917-1919
Elmer Ernest Southard's papers primarily consist of handwritten and typed letters he sent to Norman Fenton. Southard, the first Director of Boston Psychopathic Hospital, was Karl Menninger's first significant mentor. Southard and Fenton collaborated on researching case studies and publishing about shell shock in World War I. There is also a course syllabus for his second year neuropathology course at Harvard Medical School. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: April 28, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute observed that Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister, and his party of thirty German immigrants were in Lawrence and getting ready to head south to establish a colony on the Neosho River that they planned to name Humboldt. Nute was not optimistic that the Serenbetz party would succeed due to their lack of financial resources. Nute commented that immigration into Kansas continued to increase and estimated that nearly 1,000 people per day entered the territory. He stated that most of the new immigrants were from Western states and "of the right kind to stay." Nute also commented on the lack of saw and grist mills in the territory and blamed the New England Emigrant Aid Company for the deficiency.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: August 3, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute described efforts to establish a high school in Lawrence as well as a university in Kansas Territory. He also advised Hale to pay close attention to the activities of Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister who was the leader of a group of German immigrants who settled in Humboldt, Kansas Territory. In Nute's opinion, Serenbetz was an "unmitigated humbug and nuisance" who came to Kansas for self-interested reasons. Nute urged Hale to stop sending settlers to Kansas who lacked financial resources or a willingness to work to support themselves.


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