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Showing 1 - 19 of 19 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


A party of patches

A party of patches
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: June 6, 1891
This political cartoon drawn by Bernard Gilliam was copied from the satirical magazine Judge presents the Republican perception of the People's (Populist) Party. The artist depicts the People's Party as a hot air balloon made up of a patchwork of pieces, with each piece labeled with the name of the political organization or party that has been subsumed under the banner of the Populists. Some of the more recognizable "patches" include the Prohibition Party, the Greenback Party, the Farmer's Alliance, and the Knights of Labor Party. Inside the balloon's basket are two leading Populists from Kansas, William Peffer and "Sockless" Jerry Simpson.


Celebrated violet waltz varied for the guitar

Celebrated violet waltz varied for the guitar
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1853
Guitarist Henry Worrall published his solo instrumental "Violet Waltz" with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. This copy comes from Worrall's personal collection. The many penciled notations included throughout this copy are presumed to be Worrall's. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


E.H. Murdock to Governor Henry Allen correspondence and miscellaneous

E.H. Murdock to Governor Henry Allen correspondence and miscellaneous
Creator: Murdock, E.H.
Date: December 27, 1919
E.H. Murdock sends Governor Allen suggestions "to protect the CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES against the enormous expense and inconvenience of strikes?" Suggestions,such as this, were frequently received by Governor Allen prior to introduction of legislation creating the Court of Industrial Relations. Allen's opposition to labor strikes as a means of settling disputes and the proposed legislation to end the need for strikes was publicized widely throughout the country. This lead to a high volume of correspondence on the issue, both pro and con.


Eleanor Richardson to her daughter

Eleanor Richardson to her daughter
Date: Unknown
Letter addressed to Miss Eleanor Richardson in Michigan from her mother, Eleanor, in Cincinnati, Ohio. The younger Eleanor married Jotham Meeker in 1830.


Floating gems, composed and arranged for the guitar by Henry Worrall

Floating gems, composed and arranged for the guitar by Henry Worrall
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1860
Henry Worrall published this instrumental composition for solo guitar with A.C. Peters & Bros, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1860. Worrall's Floating Gems included four individual pieces: 1. Storm Waltzes, 2. Medley of Airs, 3. Fantasia, On Lucy Long, 4. Two Songs Without Words. This edition includes only song number four. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Henry Worrall

Henry Worrall
Creator: Landy, J. (James)
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This is a cabinet card photograph of musician and illustrator Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas. Presumably, Worrall sat for this photo in the studio of James Landy in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Worrall formerly lived. The photo was likely taken in the 1870s sometime after 1873. The back of the photograph is inscribed by Landy as follows: "Compliments of your friend J Landy."


Henry and Mary Worrall

Henry and Mary Worrall
Date: About 1886
A cabinet card portrait of Henry and Mary Worrall in Cincinnati, Ohio, possibly in 1886. The inscription on the back of the card indicates that it was "taken by Webber."


Indianapolis Clowns

Indianapolis Clowns
Date: 1944
This black and white photograph shows members of the Indianapolis Clowns. The franchised was organized between 1935 and 1936 in Miami, Florida. The team moved in 1943 to Cincinnati, Ohio and later in 1946 to Indianapolis, Indiana. In the later years the team became a kind of the "Harlem Globetrotters" of baseball before disbanding in the late 1980s. Some of the players in this photograph have been identified. Back row: l to r; Hoss Walker, unknown, Johnny Williams, Fred Wilson, Roosevelt Davis, Alec Radcliff and McKinley "Bunny" Downs. Middle row: Sam Hairston, unknown, Buster Haywood, unknown, unknown. Front row: unknown, unknown, Richard "King Tut" King, unknown.


Leigh R. Webber to Mrs. Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Mrs. Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: September 5, 1863
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Natchez, Mississippi, addressed to Mrs. Brown, wife of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses reading accounts of the raid on Lawrence in the Cincinnati newspapers. He also describes camp life in Natchez, and shares a rumor that the troops may soon go to Kansas.


Map of the Western States by J. M. Atwood

Map of the Western States by J. M. Atwood
Creator: Ensign, Bridgman & Fanning
Date: 1855
Map detailing the counties and cities in Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Detailed illustrations of Chicago, Detroit, Cincinnati, and St. Louis are found in each corner. This map is provided through a co-operative project between the Lecompton Historical Society and the Kansas Historical Society. Partial funding was provided by the Ross and Margaret Wulfkuhle Charitable Trust and the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area.


Mitchell's Travellers Guide through the United States

Mitchell's Travellers Guide through the United States
Creator: Mitchell, Samuel Augustus
Date: 1834
Map of the United States showing roads, distances, steam boat and canal routes. The vicinities of major cities are inset, including Cincinnati, Albany, New Orleans, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston, and Washington, D. C. Towns are indexed on the back of the map. This map is provided through a co-operative project between the Lecompton Historical Society and the Kansas Historical Society. Partial funding was provided by the Ross and Margaret Wulfkuhle Charitable Trust and the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area.


Rookwood pitcher

Rookwood pitcher
Creator: Rookwood Pottery Company.
Date: 1882
Rookwood Pottery pitcher with Japanese-inspired bird decorations by Albert R. Valentien. The base of the pitcher is marked with an anchor, the initials "A.R.V.", "Rookwood 1882 R", and "182-1". The Rookwood Pottery Company was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1880 by Maria Longsworth Nichols. Albert R. Valentien joined the company's newly-organized Decorating Department in 1881, becoming its first full-time decorator.


Samuel Whitcomb to G. Smith

Samuel Whitcomb to G. Smith
Creator: Whitcomb, Samuel
Date: August 30, 1856
This letter, written in Springfield by Samuel Whitcomb, is addressed to the Honorable G. Smith of Peterborg, New York. It is a passionate piece of correspondence that discusses slavery and liberty, demonstrating the conviction of this free-soil advocate. Whitcomb also expressed his frustration that the federal government was not more supportive of the free state cause in Kansas Territory, as well as his fear that the war was destined to spread out from Kansas.


Sebastopol

Sebastopol
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: Between 1850 and 1900
A manuscript version of guitarist Henry Worrall's celebrated guitar instrumental "Sebastopol." Worrall initially published "Sebastopol" in the 1850s with W. C. Peters and Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. Included among Worrall's surviving music manuscripts are these manuscript editions of the introduction and finale to "Sebastopol." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Sebastopol. A descriptive fantaisie for the guitar, by Henry Worrall

Sebastopol. A descriptive fantaisie for the guitar, by Henry Worrall
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1860
Henry Worrall composed and arranged Sebastopol, a solo parlor guitar piece, and published it in 1860 with A.C. Peters & J.L. Peters, music publishers, Cincinnati, Ohio. The piece was very popular throughout the nineteenth century. Worrall intended the piece to be an imitation of a military bugle and band. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.


Steamboat Lebanon, bill of lading

Steamboat Lebanon, bill of lading
Creator: Smith & Haneley
Date: June 23, 1857
Bill of lading listing several items of furniture to be shipped by Smith & Haneley via the steamboat Lebanon from Cincinnati, Ohio to J. Cook & Co. in Tecumseh, Kansas Territory.


The new chicken in the barnyard

The new chicken in the barnyard
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: June 13, 1891
This cartoon, from the cover of the satirical magazine Judge, illustrates the "birth" of the Populist Party. Hovering over the chick (who has a banner on his straw hat labeled "Farmer's Alliance") is a rooster symbolizing the Republican Party, and a chicken, representing the Democratic Party. The subtitle reads, "THE LITTLE CHICK (to old parties -- "You're too big for me just now, 'tis true, but I'll lick you both in '92. Cock-a-doodle-doodle-doo!!"


U.S. 50 coast to coast. The central pleasure route

U.S. 50 coast to coast. The central pleasure route
Creator: U.S. 50 Federation
Date: 1950s
This pamphlet by the U.S. 50 Federation promotes travel on U.S. Route 50 from the Pacific to the Atlantic coasts. It details specifically the travel and tourism sites to be found on the highway through Kansas. Automobile travel is highlighted as an exciting means to explore and see the many attractions found throughout the nation.


Unidentified members of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry

Unidentified members of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry
Date: Between 1863 and 1865
Photographs of unidentified members of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. The photographers include J. P. Babbitt in Fort Scott, Kansas, David R. Hoag and Israel Quick in Cincinnati, Ohio, Durland & Company in Lawrence, Kansas, W. P. Bliss & Wentworth in Topeka, Kansas, S. M. Eby & Son in Kansas City, Missouri, Brown's Photography in Paola, Kansas, F. A. Olds in Covington, Indiana, R. H. Kimball & Company in Leavenworth, Kansas, and George W. Wertz in Kansas City, Missouri.


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